Parsons, Simon


Reports of the AAAI 2009 Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the 2009 Fall Symposium Series, held Thursday through Saturday, November 5–7, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The Symposium Series was preceded on Wednesday, November 4 by a one-day AI funding seminar. The titles of the seven symposia were as follows: (1) Biologically Inspired Cognitive Architectures, (2) Cognitive and Metacognitive Educational Systems, (3) Complex Adaptive Systems and the Threshold Effect: Views from the Natural and Social Sciences, (4) Manifold Learning and Its Applications, (5) Multirepresentational Architectures for Human-Level Intelligence, (6) The Uses of Computational Argumentation, and (7) Virtual Healthcare Interaction.


AAAI 2007 Spring Symposium Series Reports

AI Magazine

The 2007 Spring Symposium Series was held Monday through Wednesday, March 26-28, 2007, at Stanford University, California. The titles of the nine symposia in this symposium series were (1) Control Mechanisms for Spatial Knowledge Processing in Cognitive/Intelligent Systems, (2) Game Theoretic and Decision Theoretic Agents, (3) Intentions in Intelligent Systems, (4) Interaction Challenges for Artificial Assistants, (5) Logical Formalizations of Commonsense Reasoning, (6) Machine Reading, (7) Multidisciplinary Collaboration for Socially Assistive Robotics, (8) Quantum Interaction, and (9) Robots and Robot Venues: Resources for AI Education.


AAAI-2002 Fall Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The AAAI-2002 Fall Symposium Series was held Friday through Sunday, 15 to 17 November 2002 at the Sea Crest Conference Center in North Falmouth, Massachusetts. The five symposia in the 2002 Fall Symposia Series were (1) Chance Discovery: The Discovery and Management of Chance Events; (2) Etiquette for Human-Computer Work; (3) Human-Robot Interaction; (4) Intent Inference for Users, Teams, and Adversaries; and (5) Personalized Agents. The highlights of each symposium were presented at a special plenary session. Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) technical reports of most of the symposia will be made available to AAAI members.


AAAI 2002 Workshops

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) presented the AAAI-02 Workshop Program on Sunday and Monday, 28-29 July 2002 at the Shaw Convention Center in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The AAAI-02 workshop program included 18 workshops covering a wide range of topics in AI. The workshops were Agent-Based Technologies for B2B Electronic-Commerce; Automation as a Caregiver: The Role of Intelligent Technology in Elder Care; Autonomy, Delegation, and Control: From Interagent to Groups; Coalition Formation in Dynamic Multiagent Environments; Cognitive Robotics; Game-Theoretic and Decision-Theoretic Agents; Intelligent Service Integration; Intelligent Situation-Aware Media and Presentations; Meaning Negotiation; Multiagent Modeling and Simulation of Economic Systems; Ontologies and the Semantic Web; Planning with and for Multiagent Systems; Preferences in AI and CP: Symbolic Approaches; Probabilistic Approaches in Search; Real-Time Decision Support and Diagnosis Systems; Semantic Web Meets Language Resources; and Spatial and Temporal Reasoning.


A Review of Nonmonotonic Reasoning

AI Magazine

It is possible to argue, relatively convincingly, that any research topic only begins to become mature when it appears on a syllabus somewhere. Once the topic has become well enough understood that it can be explained easily to paying customers, and stable enough that anyone teaching it is not likely to have to update his/her teaching materials every few months as new developments are reported, it can be considered to have arrived. Another reasonable indicator of the maturity of a subject, a milestone along the road to academic respectability, is the publication of a really good book on the subject -- not another research monograph but a book that consolidates what is already known, surveys and relates existing ideas, and maybe even unifies some of them. Grigoris Antoniou's Nonmonotonic Reasoning is just such a milestone -- well written, informative, and a good source of information on an important and complex subject.