Goto

Collaborating Authors

Naik, Devang


Detecting Emotion Primitives from Speech and their use in discerning Categorical Emotions

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Emotion plays an essential role in human-to-human communication, enabling us to convey feelings such as happiness, frustration, and sincerity. While modern speech technologies rely heavily on speech recognition and natural language understanding for speech content understanding, the investigation of vocal expression is increasingly gaining attention. Key considerations for building robust emotion models include characterizing and improving the extent to which a model, given its training data distribution, is able to generalize to unseen data conditions. This work investigated a long-shot-term memory (LSTM) network and a time convolution - LSTM (TC-LSTM) to detect primitive emotion attributes such as valence, arousal, and dominance, from speech. It was observed that training with multiple datasets and using robust features improved the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for valence, by 30\% with respect to the baseline system. Additionally, this work investigated how emotion primitives can be used to detect categorical emotions such as happiness, disgust, contempt, anger, and surprise from neutral speech, and results indicated that arousal, followed by dominance was a better detector of such emotions.


Multi-task Learning for Speaker Verification and Voice Trigger Detection

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Automatic speech transcription and speaker recognition are usually treated as separate tasks even though they are interdependent. In this study, we investigate training a single network to perform both tasks jointly. We train the network in a supervised multi-task learning setup, where the speech transcription branch of the network is trained to minimise a phonetic connectionist temporal classification (CTC) loss while the speaker recognition branch of the network is trained to label the input sequence with the correct label for the speaker. We present a large-scale empirical study where the model is trained using several thousand hours of labelled training data for each task. We evaluate the speech transcription branch of the network on a voice trigger detection task while the speaker recognition branch is evaluated on a speaker verification task. Results demonstrate that the network is able to encode both phonetic \emph{and} speaker information in its learnt representations while yielding accuracies at least as good as the baseline models for each task, with the same number of parameters as the independent models.


Lattice-based Improvements for Voice Triggering Using Graph Neural Networks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Voice-triggered smart assistants often rely on detection of a trigger-phrase before they start listening for the user request. Mitigation of false triggers is an important aspect of building a privacy-centric non-intrusive smart assistant. In this paper, we address the task of false trigger mitigation (FTM) using a novel approach based on analyzing automatic speech recognition (ASR) lattices using graph neural networks (GNN). The proposed approach uses the fact that decoding lattice of a falsely triggered audio exhibits uncertainties in terms of many alternative paths and unexpected words on the lattice arcs as compared to the lattice of a correctly triggered audio. A pure trigger-phrase detector model doesn't fully utilize the intent of the user speech whereas by using the complete decoding lattice of user audio, we can effectively mitigate speech not intended for the smart assistant. We deploy two variants of GNNs in this paper based on 1) graph convolution layers and 2) self-attention mechanism respectively. Our experiments demonstrate that GNNs are highly accurate in FTM task by mitigating ~87% of false triggers at 99% true positive rate (TPR). Furthermore, the proposed models are fast to train and efficient in parameter requirements.