Balch, Tucker


Ant Hunt: Towards a Validated Model of Live Ant Hunting Behavior

AAAI Conferences

Biologists seek concise, testable models of behavior for the animals they study. We suggest a robot programming paradigm in which animal behaviors are described as robot controllers to support a cycle of hypothesis generation and testing of animal models. In this work we illustrate that approach by modeling the hunting behavior of a captive colony of Aphaenogaster cockerelli , a desert harvester ant. In laboratory animal experiments we introduce live prey (fruit flies) into the foraging arena of the colony. We observe the behavior of the ants, and we measure aspects of their performance in capturing the prey. Based on these observations we create a model of their behavior using Clay, a Java library developed for coding hybrid controllers in a behavior-based manner. We then validate that model in quantitative comparisons with the live animal behavior.


The AAAI-2002 Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The Eleventh Annual AAAI Robot Competition and Exhibition was held at the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, in August 2002. This article describes each of the events that were held: Robot Challenge, Robot Exhibition, Robot Host, and Robot Rescue.


The AAAI-2002 Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The Eleventh Annual AAAI Robot Competition and Exhibition was held at the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, in August 2002. This article describes each of the events that were held: Robot Challenge, Robot Exhibition, Robot Host, and Robot Rescue.


The 2002 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2002 Spring Symposium Series, held Monday through Wednesday, 25 to 27 March 2002, at Stanford University. The nine symposia were entitled (1) Acquiring (and Using) Linguistic (and World) Knowledge for Information Access; (2) Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Entertainment; (3) Collaborative Learning Agents; (4) Information Refinement and Revision for Decision Making: Modeling for Diagnostics, Prognostics, and Prediction; (5) Intelligent Distributed and Embedded Systems; (6) Logic-Based Program Synthesis: State of the Art and Future Trends; (7) Mining Answers from Texts and Knowledge Bases; (8) Safe Learning Agents; and (9) Sketch Understanding.


The 2002 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2002 Spring Symposium Series, held Monday through Wednesday, 25 to 27 March 2002, at Stanford University. The nine symposia were entitled (1) Acquiring (and Using) Linguistic (and World) Knowledge for Information Access; (2) Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Entertainment; (3) Collaborative Learning Agents; (4) Information Refinement and Revision for Decision Making: Modeling for Diagnostics, Prognostics, and Prediction; (5) Intelligent Distributed and Embedded Systems; (6) Logic-Based Program Synthesis: State of the Art and Future Trends; (7) Mining Answers from Texts and Knowledge Bases; (8) Safe Learning Agents; and (9) Sketch Understanding.


Ten Years of the AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

Summer 2001 marked the tenth AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition. A decade of contests and exhibitions have inspired innovation and research in AI robotics. We also reflect on how the contest has served as an arena for important debates in the AI and robotics communities. The article closes with a speculative look forward to the next decade of AAAI robot competitions.


RoboCup-2001: The Fifth Robotic Soccer World Championships

AI Magazine

RoboCup-2001 was the Fifth International RoboCup Competition and Conference. It was held for the first time in the United States, following RoboCup-2000 in Melbourne, Australia; RoboCup-99 in Stockholm; RoboCup-98 in Paris; and RoboCup-97 in Osaka.


Ten Years of the AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

Summer 2001 marked the tenth AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition. A decade of contests and exhibitions have inspired innovation and research in AI robotics. Here we look back at the origins of the contest and how it evolved. We also reflect on how the contest has served as an arena for important debates in the AI and robotics communities. The article closes with a speculative look forward to the next decade of AAAI robot competitions.


RoboCup-2001: The Fifth Robotic Soccer World Championships

AI Magazine

RoboCup-2001 was the Fifth International RoboCup Competition and Conference. It was held for the first time in the United States, following RoboCup-2000 in Melbourne, Australia; RoboCup-99 in Stockholm; RoboCup-98 in Paris; and RoboCup-97 in Osaka. This article discusses in detail each one of the events at RoboCup-2001, focusing on the competition leagues.


RoboCup-2000: The Fourth Robotic Soccer World Championships

AI Magazine

The Fourth Robotic Soccer World Championships (RoboCup-2000) was held from 27 August to 3 September 2000 at the Melbourne Exhibition Center in Melbourne, Australia. RoboCup-2000 showed dramatic improvement over past years in each of the existing robotic soccer leagues (legged, small size, mid size, and simulation) and introduced RoboCup Jr. competitions and RoboCup Rescue and Humanoid demonstration events. The RoboCup Workshop, held in conjunction with the championships, provided a forum for the exchange of ideas and experiences among the different leagues. This article summarizes the advances seen at RoboCup-2000, including reports from the championship teams and overviews of all the RoboCup events.