Autonomous Vehicles


Toyota has plenty for robots to do during the 2020 Tokyo Olympics

The Japan Times

When athletes and organizers descend on Tokyo for the 2020 Olympic Games, they'll be ferried around in autonomous cars, while torch relay runners will be accompanied by AI-equipped cars. Robots will ferry javelins and hammers. All told, Toyota Motor Corp. will provide 3,700 vehicles, including dozens of self-driving cars, about 500 fuel-cell vehicles and 850 battery-electric cars to the international sports competition. As a top sponsor of the Tokyo Olympics and an automaker facing a murky future when gasoline-powered engines will fade away, Toyota is doing everything it can to market its transition into an eventual provider of on-demand transportation for consumers and businesses, instead of being merely an industrial manufacturer. "We want to use the Olympics and Paralympics that happen every two years as a milestone," Masaaki Ito, general manager of Toyota's Olympic and Paralympic Division, said in an interview.


Take a close-up look at Tesla's self-driving car computer and its two AI brains

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Tesla showed the computer at the Hot Chips conference. Designing your own chips is hard. But Tesla, one of the most aggressive developers of autonomous vehicle technology, thinks it's worth it. The company shared details Tuesday about how it fine-tuned the design of its AI chips so two of them are smart enough to power its cars' upcoming "full self-driving" abilities. Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk and his colleagues revealed the company's third-generation computing hardware in April.


'A burger, a coffee, whatever': Food delivery robots may soon roll up to Purdue's campus

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

These autonomous robots put the special in special delivery and you might see them on a college campus near you! WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind.-- How do delivery robots operate in winter? What if no one picks up the delivery? A board in West Lafayette, Indiana, has unanimously approved a pilot program bringing robotic delivery services to Purdue University, as well as a suspension of city code allowing small, cooler-sized robots to operate on city sidewalks. But first, the board members had several questions about the program from San Francisco-based Starship Technologies before it could debut in September.


Amazon and Microsoft are putting world at risk with killer AI, study says

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – Amazon, Microsoft and Intel are among leading tech companies putting the world at risk through killer robot development, according to a report that surveyed major players from the sector about their stance on lethal autonomous weapons. Dutch NGO Pax ranked 50 companies by three criteria: whether they were developing technology that could be relevant to deadly AI, whether they were working on related military projects, and if they had committed to abstaining from contributing in the future. "Why are companies like Microsoft and Amazon not denying that they're currently developing these highly controversial weapons, which could decide to kill people without direct human involvement?" The use of AI to allow weapon systems to autonomously select and attack targets has sparked ethical debates in recent years, with critics warning they would jeopardize international security and herald a third revolution in warfare after gunpowder and the atomic bomb. A panel of government experts debated policy options regarding lethal autonomous weapons at a meeting of the United Nations Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons in Geneva on Wednesday.


What artificial intelligence means to business analysts

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Are you ready for the robot invasion? Or are you just plain worried that your job will be automated away? The age of artificial intelligence is not simply here but has permeated through our very existence already. From forecasting market trends to reordering your groceries that were going low to being delivered by drones, artificial intelligence is all around our lives and the way we do business. When we talk about artificial intelligence, its focus centers around adding and, more importantly, enhancing our current capabilities.


How 5G can save lives

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AR and thermal imaging in the Qwake C-Thru mask could help firefighters better navigate burning buildings. With smoke, flames and a claustrophobic mask on, running into a burning building is a leap of faith. Firefighters are taught never to leave the wall, because they could become disoriented, run out of air and die. "The way we used to look for people was almost as if you were blind," said Harold Schapelhouman, fire chief of the Menlo Park Fire Protection District. That could change with technology like Qwake's C-Thru.


How Can We Use Artificial Intelligence To Improve Society?

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Disease Diagnosis & Medication: Data privacy and regulatory barriers will cause a delay in disrupting this segment. If the patient is able to access their own data, they should be able to use AI for diagnosis of their X-rays or MRI scans as a second opinion. A soldier in war zones can get the AR/VR experience with instructions to help treat themselves and remove a bullet. DNA based personalized medicine to extend the life of humans. Robots to remind you to take medicine pills (e.g.


How Tesla's Path To Self-Driving Cars Is Different From Others CleanTechnica

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The race to fully autonomous vehicles is on. In April, Elon Musk declared that Tesla should have over a million level 5 autonomous vehicles manufactured by 2020. To clarify, that means over a million cars equipped with the necessary hardware capable of driving with no help from a driver. In addition, government approvals will be necessary (read: mandatory) long before self-driving Teslas will be commonplace. In addition, Musk also sparked some lively debate when he commented that Tesla will not be relying on lidar, the laser sensor technology that self-driving cars from many other companies (most notably Google's Waymo) currently depend on for "seeing" lines on the road, pedestrians, and more.


SparkFun JetBot AI Kit with NVIDIA Jetson Nano

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There is no better way to learn coding and AI than getting some hands-on practice. You can teach the robot to follow objects, avoid collisions, and a whole lot more with simple tutorials available. It is compatible with TensorFlow, PyTorch, Caffe, and MXNet frameworks. The kit includes a Leopard Imaging 145FOV wide angle camera, EDIMAX WiFi Adapter, SparkFun Micro OLED Breakout, and all the parts you need to get started.


Why Tech Firm Scale AI Is the Next $1 Billion Unicorn Star

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Scale AI Inc., a three-year-old startup run by a 22-year-old, is teaching machines how to see. For that, it just joined Silicon Valley's list of unicorns with a fresh $100 million investment that puts its valuation above the coveted $1 billion mark, and its artificial intelligence (AI) technology has already attracted big-name customers in the field for autonomous vehicles, according to Bloomberg. Alphabet Inc.'s (GOOGL) Waymo, General Motor Co.'s (GM) Cruise, and Uber Technologies Inc. (UBER) are all buying what Scale has to offer, because well, self-driving cars are machines that need to be able to see. Scale stands out because it has built a set of software tools that are significantly reducing the time it takes to train a machine how to process and interpret visual imagery. And less time means lower costs.