Robots


Robots could bring about the death of the five-day working week

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Robots could bring about a four-day working week in Britain as automation and artificial intelligence increase workplace efficiency, a new study has revealed. If new technologies were passed on to staff, they would be able to generate their current weekly economic output in just four days. Even relatively modest gains from using robots and AI had the potential to give British workers Scandinavian levels of leisure time, according to research done by the cross-party Social Market Foundation (SMF) thinktank. The research will boost John McDonnell's plans to reduce hours in the working week The conclusions of the study will come as a boost to John McDonnell, the shadow chancellor, who wants to look at reducing hours in the working week. TUC general secretary Frances O'Grady used her speech to the organisation's annual gathering last month to call for a four-day working week, saying that it should be achievable by the end of the century.


The 7 Myths of AI - By Robin Bordoli

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If you're a business executive (rather than a data scientist or machine learning expert), you've probably been exposed to the mainstream media coverage of artificial intelligence or AI. You've seen articles in The Economist and Vanity Fair, you've seen emotional stories about Tesla Autopilot and the threat of AI to mankind by such luminaries as Stephen Hawking, and you might even have seen Dilbert make jokes about Artificial Intelligence and Human Intelligence. So if you're an executive who cares about growing your business, all this AI media coverage may prompt two nagging questions. First, is the business potential of AI real or not? Second, how does AI apply to my business?


I'm worried Artificial Intelligence could make us stupid

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Once upon a time if I wanted to find my way to somewhere unfamiliar, I would have pulled out a map and plotted my route. These days I just put the destination into my smartphone and let it make all the decisions. Is this a simple, practical thing to do or, by relying on increasingly smarter phones, are we allowing them to make us, day by day, a little bit dumber? I've spent the last few days at an international conference on artificial intelligence pondering just this question. We were discussing, among other things, the effect that the rise of machine intelligence is having on our brains.


Robots at Work and Play

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Advancements in robotics are continually taking place in the fields of space exploration, health care, public safety, entertainment, defense, and more. These machines--some fully autonomous, some requiring human input--extend our grasp, enhance our capabilities, and travel as our surrogates to places too dangerous or difficult for us to go. Gathered here are recent images of robotic technology, including a Japanese probe reaching a distant asteroid, bipedal-robot fighting matches in Japan, a cuddly cat-substitute robotic pillow, an automated milking machine, delivery bots, telepresence robots, technology on the fashion runway, robotic prosthetic limbs and exoskeletons, and much more.


Next recession to usher in wave of artificial intelligence

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The European Union needs to brace itself for the prospect of a new wave of technology and productivity resurgence in ten to fifteen years' time, spearheaded by the implementation of AI and robotics innovations. This was the message introduced by Stefan Crets, Executive Director of CSR Europe, who, opening the high-level event, said that digitisation required a new agility in the workplace and a new way of collaborating. "The future of work is determined by the actions we take today and the choices we make. What we want to do is exchange experience, pull the expertise together and find the best practices." Economist Mirko Draca, co-author of a London School of Economics (LSE) report commissioned by Huawei, entitled'The evolving role of ICT in the economy,' said that a new wave of automation had started.


Surgeon Performs Mastectomies Using Robotics

U.S. News

Some women can be treated with lumpectomies, which conserve the breast. But more women are turning to mastectomies, not only to treat breast cancer, but also to prevent it; the rate of mastectomies increased 36 percent from 2005 to 2013, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.


Drink too much beer at a Dallas Cowboys game? Now a free robot-driven van will scoop you up afterward.

Washington Post

Things are not only bigger in Texas, they're also hotter, more sprawling and increasingly traffic-clogged thanks to a population boom that has lasted nearly a decade. In many of the state's fast-growing, car-dependent cities, these realities make for lousy walking conditions and long commutes. For the self-driving car company Drive.ai, Nearly four months after the Mountain View, Calif.-based start-up launched a six-month pilot program in nearby Frisco, Tex., the company deployed its second self-driving service on public roads in Arlington, Tex., on Friday. The service -- which is free to use -- will operate multiple routes in geo-fenced areas in downtown Arlington, according to Drive.ai


Drink too much beer at a Dallas Cowboys game? Now a free robot-driven van will scoop you up afterward.

Washington Post

Things are not only bigger in Texas, they're also hotter, more sprawling and increasingly traffic-clogged thanks to a population boom that has lasted nearly a decade. In many of the state's fast-growing, car-dependent cities, these realities make for lousy walking conditions and long commutes. For the self-driving car company Drive.ai, Nearly four months after the Mountain View, Calif.-based start-up launched a six-month pilot program in nearby Frisco, Tex., the company deployed its second self-driving service on public roads in Arlington, Tex., on Friday. The service -- which is free to use -- will operate multiple routes in geo-fenced areas in downtown Arlington, according to Drive.ai


Chuck E. Cheese Robot Helped Man Find His Way

U.S. News

To his right, two 700-pound lions with the same blue eyes stand idle in the sequined costumes he sewed for them. He taps a button and the lions come alive. They dance, strum guitars and sing a parody of a booming Bon Jovi song, a sharp "pfft, pfft, pfft" shooting from their pneumatic cylinders.


Eric Tyree On The Future Of Artificial Intelligence And Humanity

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The debate on how to appropriately incorporate artificial intelligence into everyday life will become more intense as the robots get smarter. There are moral as well as practical questions, but also safety concerns. First written down by Isaac Asimov 75 years ago, the first of Three Laws of Robotics states that "a robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm." Conceived as science fiction, that law has some serious connections to today's real world. Carlson Wagonlit Travel vice president and chief data scientist Eric Tyree uses self-driving cars as an example of how AI can go wrong but eventually benefit the masses.