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AI Weekly: Amazon went wide with Alexa; now it's going deep

#artificialintelligence

Amazon's naked ambition to become part of everyone's daily lives was on full display this week at its annual hardware event. It announced a slew of new Alexa-powered devices, including a home surveillance drone, a suite of Ring-branded car alarm systems, and miscellany like an adorable little kids' Echo device. But it's clear Amazon's strategy has shifted, even if only for a product cycle, from going wide to going deep. Last year, Amazon baked its virtual assistant into any household device that could accommodate a chip. Its list of new widgets with Alexa seemed a mile long and included a menagerie of home goods, like lamps and microwaves.


Free workshop on Deep Learning with Keras and TensorFlow

#artificialintelligence

Because this year's UseR 2020 in Munich couldn't happen as an in-person event, I will be giving my workshop on Deep Learning with Keras and TensorFlow as an online event on You can register for FREE via Eventbrite. Deep learning is an artificial intelligence that mimics the workings of a human brain in processing different data, creating patterns and interpreting information that is used for decision making. It is a subfield of machine learning in artificial intelligence and Its networks has the capability to learn, supervised or unsupervised, from data that is either structured or labelled. It is one of the hottest trends in machine learning at the moment and there are many problems where deep learning shines, such as Self Driving Cars, Natural Language Processing, Machine Translations, image recognition and Artificial Intelligence (AI) and so on.


The AI 'Intelligence Explosion' Might Happen This Way, Including For AI Self-Driving Cars

#artificialintelligence

Sometimes you initiate an action and in a domino-like manner it gets going and going, seemingly feeding off itself and rapidly agitating in an almost unstoppable manner. For example, you might be familiar with those popular YouTube videos of a beaker that when filled with a special liquid will spontaneously gush out foam, akin to a type of chain reaction. History indicates that during the initial creation of the atomic bomb, some of the scientists involved were concerned that if the atomic bomb was set off, it might begin a chain reaction due to igniting a fission explosion in the air, and would generate a globally wide conflagration. There is a venue today in which a chain reaction phenomenon is being bandied about by researchers and scientists. Some vehemently assert that we are potentially going to have an AI "intelligence explosion" that will someday occur, and there are various bets that this might happen somewhere between the year 2050 and the year 2100.


Huawei Strives to Build industry Intelligent Twins with Intelligent Connectivity

#artificialintelligence

These solutions will help Huawei deliver intelligent connectivity that is characterized by ubiquitous gigabit, deterministic experience, and hyper-automation in order to build industry Intelligent Twins. Huawei also launched autonomous driving network (ADN) solutions for enterprises, propelling enterprise networks into the ADN era and accelerating the intelligent upgrades of industries. David Wang, Huawei Executive Director and Chairman of the Investment Review Board, delivered a keynote speech titled "Building industry Intelligent Twins with intelligent connectivity." According to Mr. Wang, connectivity is productivity. It is not mere computing power, but strong connectivity that makes Intelligent Twins smarter.


A robot triumphs in a curling match against elite humans

#artificialintelligence

A robot equipped with artificial intelligence (AI) can excel at the Olympic sport of curling -- and even beat top-level human teams. Success requires precision and strategy, but the game is less complex than other real-world applications of robotics. That makes curling a useful test case for AI technologies, which often perform well in simulations but falter in real-world scenarios with changing conditions. Using a method called adaptive deep reinforcement learning, Seong-Whan Lee and his colleagues at Korea University in Seoul created an algorithm that learns through trial and error to adjust a robot's throws to account for changing conditions, such as the ice surface and the positions of stones. The team's robot, nicknamed Curly, needed a few test throws to calibrate itself to the curling rink where it was to compete.


Drones – the New Critical Infrastructure

#artificialintelligence

Be prepared in the near future when you gaze into the blue skies to perceive a whole series of strange-looking things – no, they will not be birds, nor planes, or even superman. They may be temporarily, and in some cases startlingly mistaken as UFOs, given their bizarre and ominous appearance. But, in due course, they will become recognized as valuable objects of a new era of human-made flying machines, intended to serve a broad range of missions and objectives. Many such applications are already incorporated and well entrenched in serving essential functions for extending capabilities in our vital infrastructures such as transportation, utilities, the electric grid, agriculture, emergency services, and many others. Rapidly advancing technologies have made possible the dramatic capabilities of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV/drones) to uniquely perform various functions that were inconceivable a mere few years ago.


Magnetic microbots can hook up brain cells to make a neural network

New Scientist

Tiny robots that can transport individual neurons and connect them to form active neural circuits could help us study brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The robots, which were developed by Hongsoo Choi at the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea and his colleagues, are 300 micrometres long and 95 micrometre wide. They are made from a polymer coated with nickel and titanium and their movement can be controlled with external magnetic fields.


Top 5 Creepy Robots

#artificialintelligence

We were used to hearing that we'll be out of a job in twenty years, because of robots. Then the virus came, and now many are out of a job a bit faster, and not because of anything more intelligent or capable than themselves. Here are five currently existing robots that score pretty high on the creepiness scale, even without threatening to take away one's job. Sophia has somehow become the flagship of humanoid robotics. Constructed in Hong Kong, it has taken part in major TV talk shows and has been granted Saudi Arabian citizenship, although it is, essentially, not more than a "chatbot with a face" [1]. What the citizenship thing really means is unclear: Can Sophia vote?


A short guide for medical professionals in the era of artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (A.I.) is expected to significantly influence the practice of medicine and the delivery of healthcare in the near future. While there are only a handful of practical examples for its medical use with enough evidence, hype and attention around the topic are significant. There are so many papers, conference talks, misleading news headlines and study interpretations that a short and visual guide any medical professional can refer back to in their professional life might be useful. For this, it is critical that physicians understand the basics of the technology so they can see beyond the hype, evaluate A.I.-based studies and clinical validation; as well as acknowledge the limitations and opportunities of A.I. This paper aims to serve as a short, visual and digestible repository of information and details every physician might need to know in the age of A.I. We describe the simple definition of A.I., its levels, its methods, the differences between the methods with medical examples, the potential benefits, dangers, challenges of A.I., as well as attempt to provide a futuristic vision about using it in an everyday medical practice.


Of course I want an Amazon drone flying inside my house. Don't you?

ZDNet

I always know a new product is excellent when its makers describe it as "next-level." I hear you moan, on seeing the new, wondrous Ring Always Home Cam. Also: When is Prime Day 2020? Oh, how can you be such a killjoy? When Amazon's Ring describes it as "Next-Level Compact, Lightweight, Autonomously Flying Indoor Security Camera," surely you leap toward your ceiling and exclaim: "Finally, something from Amazon I actually want! A drone that flies around my living room!"