Natural Language


Software Engineer (NLP) at Mendelian Health

#artificialintelligence

Mendelian is helping doctors diagnose rare genetic diseases faster. We are looking for an experienced Software Engineer passionate about NLP (natural language processing) who can help us design and deploy production biomedical text mining techniques and help us grow our Spark, Docker, Tensor Flow, Kubernetes infrastructure, as well as exploring and implementing new technologies and frameworks. Get in touch if you want to play a key role in a high-impact growing startup -- and if you are cool with building stuff that save people's lives. We built an online medical search engine supporting physicians in identifying genes that can explain certain rare conditions. Rare diseases (all 7,000 known types combined) affect over 350m people (more than cancer!) and take on average 7 years to diagnose in clinics.


Google Home Hub first impressions: A weekend of entertainment

ZDNet

Google's Home Hub is the first smart display product from the company. Think of it as a dedicated Google Assistant tablet, permanently attached to a Google Home speaker. You give it commands with the same "OK Google" or "Hey Google" triggers, and it will answer you while also displaying information on the screen. Starting today, Google you can order a Home Hub directly from Google, or you can purchase one from Best Buy, Walmart, and Target for $149. For the past few days, I've been using a Home Hub, moving it around the house, trying to find where it best fits in.


Smart displays cover all angles to rise above the chatter

ZDNet

The Amazon Echo cracked a longstanding challenge for tech companies striving for maximum engagement: How do you embed stationary tech access points around the home in a relatively non-disruptive way? The smart speaker resonated because it provided an ambient attention-free alternative to dragging the illuminated slab from your pocket and twiddling with it long enough to get the weather or music you wanted. Not content with leaving the home to purely auditory exchanges though, tech giants are seeking to expand the success of smart speakers into smart displays. These devices use a screen to augment or confirm information relayed through requests as well as act as tablet-sized TVs for smaller rooms, because how can people be expected to carve pumpkins without having Stranger Things playing inches away? More seriously, smart displays certainly seem like a win for providing more of the benefits of smart speakers to the hearing impaired.


Synechron Launches AI Data Science Accelerators for the BFSI sector

#artificialintelligence

Synechron the global financial services consulting and technology services provider, has announced the launch of its AI Data Science Accelerators for Financial Services, Banking and Insurance (BFSI) firms. These four new solution accelerators help financial services and insurance firms solve complex business challenges by discovering meaningful relationships between events that impact one another (correlation) and cause a future event to happen (causation). Following the success of Synechron's AI Automation Program – Neo, Synechron's AI Data Science experts have developed a powerful set of accelerators that allow financial firms to address business challenges related to investment research generation, predicting the next best action to take with a wealth management client, high-priority customer complaints, and better predicting credit risk related to mortgage lending. The Accelerators combine Natural Language Processing (NLP), Deep Learning algorithms and Data Science to solve the complex business challenges and rely on a powerful Spark and Hadoop platform to ingest and run correlations across massive amounts of data to test hypotheses and predict future outcomes. The Data Science Accelerators are the fifth Accelerator program Synechron has launched in the last two years through its Financial Innovation Labs (FinLabs), which are operating in 11 key global financial markets across North America, Europe, Middle East and APAC; including: New York, Charlotte, Fort Lauderdale, London, Paris, Amsterdam, Serbia, Dubai, Pune, Bangalore and Hyderabad.


Google Home Hub Review: A Step Forward for the Smart Home, But Your Phone Still Rules

WIRED

It has become commonplace--and somehow not at all weird--to ask your speaker for a weather report, or to command your television to switch on HBO. This is the new now, a place we've been ever since Alexa marched into our living rooms and Siri snuck into our pockets. And it's likely the future, as voice-controlled smart-home speakers and devices continue to proliferate like bunnies in the spring. The thing is, I'm not quite sure it's the future we asked for. Haven't we already decided the smartphone is the best tool for ambient internet tasks?


Google Home Hub: What's inside

USATODAY

A link has been sent to your friend's email address. A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.


Battle of the video speakers: Amazon Echo Show vs. Google Home Hub

USATODAY

Google brings video to the talking speaker category with the new Google Home Hub. USA TODAY's Jefferson Graham explains why the device has potential. Google officially released the Home Hub, a $149 digital photo frame, YouTube video player, and visual recipe reciter (among other things) that looks to take on the second edition of the $229 Amazon Echo Show, which has been in release but is sold out through November 5th. The Show looks to bring the popular Alexa personal assistant into the video age, with live TV from Hulu, video-on-command from Amazon Prime Video, visual recipes, digital photos and Alexa smarts. The two are expected to be among the most heavily marketed new holiday products.


Google Home Hub review: The least-expensive smart display is one of the best

PCWorld

Google Home Hub combines a Google Home digital assistant with a 7-inch screen, allowing a graphic display of your schedule, weather, and commute traffic all at the command of your voice. There's more in there too: It has a good speaker for playing music, will act as a digital photo frame when not otherwise in use, and you can use it to watch your favorite shows if you have a compatible pay TV service, or monitor the feed from your home security cameras. In many ways it mirrors what a modern Android phone can already do, but with a better speaker and a bigger, always-on screen. There's a lot to like about this impressive little gadget, and its thoughtfully designed software is a big improvement on a smartphone. The Home Hub will almost certainly surprise you with its small size.


Google Home Hub review: the smart display to buy

The Guardian

The Home Hub is Google's first own-brand smart display, combining Google Assistant, advanced smart-home control and a digital photo frame into a neat and tidy package. Google isn't the first to market with smart displays. Amazon's Echo Show put the company's Alexa on a screen a year ago, while Google Assistant smart displays made by Harman, Lenovo and LG were released a few months ago. But Google's Home Hub is slightly different. Firstly, it doesn't have a camera on it, which Google goes to great lengths to repeatedly tell you in the hope you will find it less creepy and feel more comfortable putting it in places like your bedroom.


Google Home home first impressons: A weekend of entertainment

ZDNet

Google's Home Hub is the first smart display product from the company. Think of it as a dedicated Google Assistant tablet, permanently attached to a Google Home speaker. You give it commands with the same "OK Google" or "Hey Google" triggers, and it will answer you while also displaying information on the screen. Starting today, Google you can order a Home Hub directly from Google, or you can purchase one from Best Buy, Walmart, and Target for $149. For the past few days, I've been using a Home Hub, moving it around the house, trying to find where it best fits in.