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Build the video game of your dreams with this online training bundle

Mashable

TL;DR: The 2021 Premium Unity Game Developer Certification Bundle is on sale for £14.41 as of Aug. 1, saving you 99% on list price. Last year might've sucked big time, but it was actually a great year for gaming. A couple shiny new consoles came out, as well as a treasure trove of new games. Major studios had some big releases, but the biggest standouts of the year were the indie gems. In fact, Among Us, a charming indie party game of teamwork and betrayal, ranked high on many lists as one of the best games of 2020.


The perfect storm striking World of Warcraft

BBC News

Scott Johnson has been making WoW content online since 2004. He says he chaired a panel at Blizzard's annual fan festival in 2018 with one of the people named in the allegations - something he now sees in a new light. As someone who plays an active role in the community, he says he personally knows some of the women who were victims.


Ynglet review – small but perfectly formed

The Guardian

Ynglet is not the first video game to cast its player as an amoeba. Without an expansive repertoire of abilities to call upon, the single cell organism protagonist presents a certain kind of game designer with an alluring challenge. When all a player can do is swim, dash and float about a bit, puzzle and challenge must be carefully constructed from first principles. If it works, as in Ynglet, a meditative, chic jewel of a short game from Swedish designer Nicklas Nygren, there is a purity and clarity of design that none of the medium's sprawling action epics, with their mythically capable warriors, can rival. Contrary to appearance, this is not a game viewed top-down, as if through a microscope's viewfinder.


'Cube Crawls' and 'Frat Bro' Culture: California's Huge Activision Blizzard Lawsuit Alleges Yet Another Toxic Workplace in the Video Game Industry

TIME - Tech

On July 20, California filed an explosive workplace discrimination and harassment lawsuit against Activision Blizzard, publisher of immensely popular video games including World of Warcraft, Overwatch, and the Call of Duty franchise. It has resulted in a shockwave of response from employees, other games studios and players. The lawsuit alleges a "frat bro" culture was allowed to flourish in the office, creating an environment in which women were sexually harassed and discriminated against in advancement and compensation decisions. Activision Blizzard is one of the largest video game publishers in the world, owning studios who have created and released some of the most popular titles over the past decade. Its 2016 acquisition of Candy Crush publisher King, expanded its audience by millions more.


'Stanley Parable' and 'Gone Home' devs team up to form Ivy Road studio

Engadget

Along with showing off a bunch of upcoming games during its showcase on Thursday, Annapurna Interactive announced some developer partnerships. One of them is with a new studio called Ivy Road from powerhouse indie developers Davey Wreden and Karla Zimonja. I am thrilled to announce that @zusty, @C418 and I have started a new video game studio called Ivy Road! Wreden is best known as the writer and designer of The Stanley Parable. Zimonja previously worked at Fullbright and is the co-creator of indie hits Gone Home and Tacoma. They're now combining their talents at Ivy Road, which is based in Vancouver.


'Solar Ash' brings surreal 3D platforming to PC, PS4 and PS5 on October 26th

Engadget

As a kid, Alx Preston spent a significant amount of time as a member of the audience, watching his brother sing in choir and opera groups. One night, he found himself sitting in a pew at the heart of a large, elegant church, letting the sounds of yet another performance wash over him. He also happened to be playing a lot of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time at home. "I kind of fell into a dream state," Preston said. "I was playing a lot of Ocarina of Time at the time, and so the vocals of that mixed with this kind of fantastical vision of going through a forest. I think for me that Ocarina of Time was one of those formative games that really allowed me to see what was possible within the medium."


Need a cheap laptop? Grab this HP Chromebook for $220.

Mashable

Save $120: The HP Chromebook 14-inch FHD laptop (Intel Celeron N4000, 4GB RAM, and 32GB eMMC) is on sale for only $219.99 at Amazon as of July 29. When you're on the hunt for a new laptop, always consider its primary function. Is it for work, video games, or mostly browsing the internet? If you don't need the most powerful processor and are more budget-conscious, a Chromebook might be all you need. On sale for its best price ever, this HP Chromebook 14-inch laptop with FHD display is now just $219.99 from Amazon.



Save on gaming accessories: Level-up with these deals

ZDNet

Sure, you can train for a well-paid tech job in order to buy more gaming gear. Or you can just grab some of these excellent gaming accessories while they're on sale! These are the devices that should be at or near the top of your shortlist. Maximize your gaming experience with superior professional audio that lets you hear every movement, every footstep, so you can easily calculate the positions of your opponents. It has premium cushioned earpads and a detachable mic. For a limited time only, get HCG1 Pro Gaming Headset for $88.39 (reg.


IGEA, AMTA, and John Deere use intellectual property arguments to bash right to repair

ZDNet

The Interactive Games and Entertainment Association (IGEA), the Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association (AMTA), and machinery manufacturer John Deere have once again pushed back on the proposal that any right to repair changes need to be introduced in Australia. In its response to the Productivity Commission's right-to-repair draft report, IGEA knocked back support for several of the recommendations that were put forward. These include enabling the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to develop and publish estimates of the minimum expected durability for products, such as video game consoles and devices, and requiring manufacturers to include additional mandatory warranty text that state entitlements to consumer guarantees under Australian Consumer Law (ACL) do not require consumers to use authorised repair services or spare parts. It repeatedly cited in its latest submission [PDF] that making changes would "cause confusion for consumers", pointing out for instance that additional text may "erroneously cause consumers to believe that their entitlements under the voluntary warranty (as opposed to the guarantees) do not require consumers to use authorised repair services or spare parts (which may not necessarily be true)". As part of providing additional information to the Productivity Commission, IGEA added that if manufacturers were required to make additional repair information available where they could bypass Trusted Platform Modules, it would open up the potential for the information to be "weaponised" by malicious actors, particularly as there are no licensing or certification schemes for electronic repairers that would help manufacturers discern between legitimate and illegitimate repairers. IGEA also took the opportunity to defend video game console manufacturers saying that it is in the "financial interest" of console makers that customers have "well-functioning and reliable devices that last for years".