Games


'Fortnite' pro Turner 'Tfue' Tenney sues esports team FaZe Clan over 'oppressive' contract

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Another sign that esports has become big business: One of its biggest star athletes, Turner "Tfue" Tenney is suing his pro team, FaZe Clan, over what he calls a contract that is "oppressive, onerous, and one-sided." In the complaint filed in California Superior Court in Los Angeles, Tenney, 21, charges that FaZe Clan, an esports organization with professional teams that compete in video games such as "Call of Duty, "Fortnite Battle Royale" and "Counter-Strike," has players sign gamer agreements so that the team will "essentially'own' Tenney and other content creator/streamers and professional gamers." A popular streamer on YouTube and Twitch, Tenney signed an agreement with FaZe Clan when he was 20. He says in the suit that FaZe Clan takes up to 80% of revenue paid by third parties for Tenney's services such as sponsored online videos. 'Minecraft' update: Video game gets new blocks, better villages, and pillagers with crossbows Cloud gaming: Microsoft and Sony team up for video games in the cloud, but what's it mean for gamers? Esports star Turner "Tfue" Tenney, shown here on his Twitch channel, is suing his team FaZe Clan, saying its contract is "oppressive" and takes up to 80% of his earnings. Tfue, who recently qualified for the $30-million Fortnite World Cup Finals in July in New York, has more than 10.7 million followers on YouTube, more than 6 million followers on Twitch, and 5.5 million Instagram followers. "Anti-competitive provisions" in the agreement prevent Tenney from pursuing other deals, the suit charges. FaZe Clan violates state law because it acts as a talent agency but does not have "the requisite talent agency license," the complaint charges. The esports organization also forced Tenney to drink alcohol at parties before he turned 21, the suit charges. Tenney wants the court to void the contract with FaZe Clan and award any suitable damages. "Until now, FaZe Clan has enjoyed the fruits of this illegal business model with impunity because no one could or was willing to stand up to Faze Clan," the suit says. Through this action, Tenney seeks to shift the balance of power to the gamers and content creators/streamers, those who are actually creating value and driving the industry. As a result of this action, others will hopefully take notice of what is going on and help to clean up esports."


Minecraft at 10: a decade of building things and changing lives

The Guardian

Hidden away somewhere in my attic is an old Xbox 360 that I'll never throw away. On its hard drive is a Minecraft save file that contains the first house my oldest son ever built in the game. He was seven and, coming from a boy on the autism spectrum with a limited vocabulary and no patience to draw and paint, his creation was a revelation. Sure, it is a monstrous carbuncle, a mess of wooden planks, cobblestone and dirt. But it is also the greatest building I ever saw.


Latest 'Minecraft' update means new blocks, better villages, and pillagers with crossbows

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Video highlights from Village & Pillage, the latest update to popular video game'Minecraft.' Mojang/Microsoft "Minecraft" may be one of the best-selling games of all time – with more than 154 million copies purchased to date – but the developers haven't stopped building more into the game. Acquired by Microsoft in 2014, developer Mojang has just launched Village & Pillage, a free update that adds a plethora of new goodies to "Minecraft," for both the Java and Bedrock versions of game, which includes Windows PC ($26.95 and $26.99 for PC and Macintosh), mobile (iOS and Android, $6.99), Xbox One ($19.99) and Nintendo Switch ($29.99), and virtual reality platforms. Before we get into what's new and newsworthy in this new update, take in these additional facts about the world-renowned building simulation, released ten years ago this month: more people are playing "Minecraft" than ever before at about 91 million unique players every month (across all platforms); more than 160 million people have watched more than 5 billion hours of Minecraft video content on YouTube; and not only is "Minecraft" one of the best-selling games in history, but also one of the highest-rated, with the PC version netting a 93% average "metascore" at Metacritic.com. 'Minecraft Earth': New mobile game to offer AR experience like'Pokemon Go' As the name suggests, villages have changed quite a bit and are among the highlights in this latest'Minecraft' update. Visually, villages will look different based on biome, or region – plains, desert, savannah, taiga, and so forth – therefore you can expect to see changes based on climate and local resources.


New 'Minecraft Earth' to offer AR experience like 'Pokemon Go'

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Microsoft and Mojang have announced a new Minecraft game, 'Minecraft Earth,' for mobile devices, which uses augmented reality to place objects from the game in your real world. Minecraft is expanding its reach – into your real world. A new game, "Minecraft Earth," coming this summer for mobile devices (Android and iOS), uses augmented reality – à la "Pokémon Go" – to let you find objects in real-world locations and place objects from the game there, too. "The game's mechanics are simple: explore your neighborhood to find blocks and unique mobs for your builds. Once you have them, any flat surface is an opportunity to build," said Minecraft creative director Saxs Persson in a post on Xbox.com.


Minecraft Earth: block building game moves into the real world

The Guardian

Since its beta launch in 2009, the blocky, world-building adventure game Minecraft has been released on more than 20 different platforms, from PC to consoles to mobile phones, selling 176m copies. News of a Minecraft AR (augmented reality) app leaked a few weeks ago, but now Microsoft has officially announced Minecraft Earth. It is being developed at the company's Redmond campus, using an array of its mobile, GPS and tracking technologies. Minecraft Earth is best pictured as Pokémon Go with building blocks. When you enter the game, you see an overhead map of your surroundings (Microsoft is working with StreetMap), overlaid with the quaint blocky look of the Minecraft world.


Why AI appears to create things

#artificialintelligence

On March 10, 2016, one of the strongest Go players in the world, Lee Sedol, stared at one of the oddest moves in the history of professional Go. His opponent -- the computer program AlphaGo, from Google-owned DeepMind -- had, in the 37th move of the game, placed its stone in what the Go community calls a "shoulder hit"; a move professional Go players seldom use. Stunned, Lee just walked out of the room. AlphaGo appeared to demonstrate creative initiative exceeding the best human players. Lee returned a few moments later and played a brilliant game, though he still conceded defeat after 211 moves.


The Elder Scrolls: Blades is now available for everyone

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After a period of invite-only early access, Bethesda has announced that The Elder Scrolls: Blades can now be downloaded and played by everyone with a supported iOS or Android device. That's right, there's no need to register for early access or even use a Bethesda account, you can just download the game from Google Play or the App Store now. When it was first announced, it was confirmed that Elder Scrolls: Blades would be coming to PC and consoles as well as mobile but for the moment the release is limited to mobile devices. That's no bad thing, though; in our hands-on review of the game we found Blades to be "a thoroughly enjoyable experience" despite not being a completely fresh take on the universe. While it's now open to everyone, The Elder Scrolls: Blades is still a work-in-progress early access game and this is worth bearing in mind before you play.


Video games are a 'great equalizer' for people with disabilities

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Erin Hawley doesn't care if she wins or loses, but with adaptive controllers, she and so many other disabled gamers are able to play the game. Gaming has been a huge part of Erin Hawley's life since she started playing Atari as a little girl. When the Keyport, New Jersey-based, 35-year-old digital content producer for the Easterseals charity gets off work, she gets right on her computer or Xbox and often keeps going until it's time for bed. Hawley is a fan of shooter titles such as "Overwatch" and "Half-Life," but she'll play adventure games, puzzles, almost anything. She's also a regular on the Amazon-owned Twitch live streaming platform.


Robot Arm, Chess Computer Vision - Daniel's Blog

#artificialintelligence

The game of chess is one of the world's most popular two-player board games. I often times find myself wanting to play even when no one is around to play. One solution to this problem is to play chess on a computer or mobile device against. However, many people would agree with me in thinking that playing a virtual game of chess is a completely different experience than playing a physical game of chess. For this reason, I intend to use this project as an opportunity to build a 6 degree of freedom robotic arm that will take the place of an opponent in a physical game of Chess.


Dude's five-year 'Minecraft' game comes to an unfortunate end

Mashable

Ending five years of anything is hard, but you'd ideally like to go out in a blaze of glory. It's not quite the situation that saw the unlucky end of a five-year run of Minecraft, reportedly the longest known on the game's hardcore permadeath mode. SEE ALSO: 'Minecraft' update removes in-game references to its controversial creator As Polygon reports, talented Twitch streamer Philza ended his lengthy five-year run after being attacked by a dreaded zombie baby in magic armour, and finished by a spider. That's how I die?" said Philza as the screen suddenly flicked over to'Game Over.' "Of all the things, I knew it was going to be something stupid." Playing for that amount of time in permadeath mode -- once you die in the game, that's it, no respawning and the world is reset -- is truly impressive feat, but that doesn't make this moment any less brutal.