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Solid Waste Management


How 4 Companies Are Using AI To Solve Waste Issues On Earth And In Space

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is a tool used by people all over the world to empower humans to make informed decisions. With a responsible use of AI, humans are able to solve problems faster because artificial intelligence can process more information at a time than a human can. As climate change, sustainability, and corporate social responsibility become of increased importance for brands across the globe, business, and communications professionals should keep an eye on how emerging technologies, like AI, are being used to solve real-world problems. Some of the problems AI is solving today are right out of science fiction movies. Waste recognition, space junk, and sustainability are a few of the challenges that artificial intelligence is helping humanity tackle.


How 4 Companies Are Using AI To Solve Waste Issues On Earth & In Space

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is a tool used by people all over the world to empower humans to make informed decisions. With a responsible use of AI, humans are able to solve problems faster because artificial intelligence can process more information at a time than a human can. As climate change, sustainability, and corporate social responsibility become of increased importance for brands across the globe, business, and communications professionals should keep an eye on how emerging technologies, like AI, are being used to solve real-world problems. Some of the problems AI is solving today are right out of science fiction movies. Waste recognition, space junk, and sustainability are a few of the challenges that artificial intelligence is helping humanity tackle.


Using Artificial Intelligence To Achieve Zero Waste

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence technologies can be used to help buildings and spaces track their waste in real-time and engage users by nudging them to correctly sort their waste. According to a study by the World Bank, 98% of the world's waste is sent to landfills, dumped into oceans or being incinerated, even though a high majority of daily consumables are recyclable. This is primarily due to the high level of contaminants found in recyclables, making previously clean material practically unrecyclable and financially unmarketable. In Toronto, for every percentage point decreased in contaminated waste can create up to $1 million in recycling cost savings every year, which can be attributed to the management and sorting costs incurred by the waste hauling and collection companies. Intuitive is a Canadian company which seeks to achieve zero waste through their AI solution, Oscar.


Saskatchewan using artificial intelligence to track waste

#artificialintelligence

Innovation Saskatchewan plans to use robots to help reduce the amount of solid waste that is placed in landfills. The group unveiled its new technology at Innovation Place on the University of Regina campus on Tuesday from its two winners of the 2019 Innovation Saskatchewan challenge. Prairie Robotics used artificial intelligence and cameras to capture waste data in real time while researchers at the U of R created a system designed to handle Saskatchewan's extreme weather all while being able to weigh moving vehicles. The province expects the two solutions to be beneficial in help to reduce sold waste dumped into landfills by 30 per cent by 2030. "Our tech community has developed a tracking and reporting mechanism using artificial intelligence which can reduce the expense of landfill operations and lead to long-term environmental efficiencies," Innovation Minister Tina Beaudry-Mellor said.


Google Nest Mini review: better bass and recycled plastic

The Guardian

The second generation of Google's smallest smart speaker gets a new name, more eco-friendly, a little smarter and more bass. The £49 Nest Mini replaces the Google Home Mini as part of a revamped and renamed line of Google smart home products under the Nest brand, pushing its predecessor to a clearance price of only £19. From the outside you would be hard pushed to see what has changed. The Nest Mini sticks with the same pincushion design with a fabric top and nonslip rubber pad on the bottom. The top contains three far-field microphones and is touch sensitive.


How Are Robots Helping Us to Recycle Better - ASME

#artificialintelligence

The front end of recycling is familiar to the point of invisibility: Blue bins, clear bags, and barely comprehensible signs designating which material goes where. Once the right plastic or paper is put in the right place, most people forget all about it. For the actual recycled material, though, that's not the end of the journey but rather the beginning. Most of it gets trucked to a special recycling facility, where it is unceremoniously dumped on a concrete floor. Front-end loaders scoop bottles, papers, and myriad other materials onto conveyors, which zoom off in various directions, often climbing to different levels like staircases.


How Artificial Intelligence Could Revolutionize Recycling NowThis

#artificialintelligence

These robots could revolutionize recycling thanks to artificial intelligence. In US news and current events today, NowThis News is exploring how these trash sorting industrial robots are changing recycling with machine learning and artificial intelligence. Waste management and how we recycle plastic, paper, and more is crucial to saving the environment and fighting the climate crisis. With machine learning algorithms, these artificial intelligence robots are sorting recycling faster than humans ever could. The future of artificial intelligence-fueled trash sorting robots is bright.


What AI and Machine learning Can Do for a Smart City? Analytics Insight

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning algorithms have increasingly become an integral part of several industries. Now they are making their way to smart city initiatives, intending to automate and advance municipal activities and operations at large. Typically, a city when recognized as a smart city means that it is leveraging some kind of internet of things (IoT) and machine learning machinery to glean data from various points. A smart city has various use cases for AI-driven and IoT-enabled technology, from maintaining a healthier environment to advancing public transport and safety. By leveraging AI and machine learning algorithms, along with IoT, a city can plan for better smart traffic solutions making sure that inhabitants get from one point to another as safely and efficiently as possible.


The 'Amazon effect' is wreaking havoc on the recycling industry

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Last year's Cyber Monday was the biggest single shopping day in Amazon's 25 year history, but the company's success has led to problems for the country's recycling industry. The number of annual deliveries through the US Postal Service, Amazon's default delivery method, has doubled over the last decade, going from 3.1 billion in 2009 to 6.2 billion in 2018. The extraordinary growth of cardboard waste from shipping materials has been dubbed'the Amazon effect' at many waste removal and recycling companies. Waste management and recylcing firms have begun to call the enormous growth in packaging materials that end up in the trash as'the Amazon effect' According to a report in The Verge, corrugated cardboard accounts for close to half of the curbside recycling material in New York today, compared to just fifteen percent in 2003. The enormous increase in residential packaging materials has come at the worst possible time, as in 2018 China, formerly the world's largest recycler, began refusing shipments of recyclable cardboard from the US in instances where it was contaminated by .5 percent or more of other material.


Machine Learning Rapidly Improves Waste Sorting To Environmental & Economic Benefit CleanTechnica

#artificialintelligence

Humans have been building machines to separate waste into different streams of different value requiring differing processes for decades. Until recently, we were mostly failing to do it well enough to be worth the investment. Instead, millions of people globally manually sort trash, sometimes with developed country workplace safety standards, sometimes living in developing country trash fields and scraping a living out of them. In London in the 1850s, when the population was roughly 3 million, a thousand rag and bone men plied their trade, greasy bags over their shoulders or slung on rough carts, picking through the detritus of the city to find enough items of value to allow them to pay for their lodging and food. In 1988, the World Bank estimated that 1-2% of the global population made most or all of its living picking through waste.