Marine


IBM develops AI-based tech that predicts sea wave patterns

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Wave forecasting can reduce risk and increase cost savings for the marine industry, but IBM's new tech can be applied to a variety of industries and companies. Supply chains must always factor known and unknown risk into their supply chain plans. "Marine industries are subject to huge uncertainties," Fearghal O'Donncha, IBM Researcher, told Supply Chain Dive. What we're focusing on more moving forward is how we can work with other organizations to extend it from research to an operational component that can provide value to a number of industries, such as the supply chain industry."


la-tr-cruises-hurtigruten-underwater-drone-views-20171010-story.html

Los Angeles Times

Hurtigruten cruise line introduces a new way to see what lurks beneath the world's most remote polar waters. On its expedition ships, the company is introducing an underwater drone that streams real-time video of orcas, leopard sharks, penguins and other creatures beneath the water. Or passengers can wear masks with digital displays that may make them feel like they're on a dive deep in the ocean Hurtigruten plans to start by outfitting two hybrid-powered ships -- the Roald Amundsen and the Fridtjof Nansen -- with the new underwater drone. "[W]ith underwater drones on our ships we can take our guests to areas less explored than the surface of Mars," company Chief Executive Daniel Skjeldam said in a statement.


Ghost Ships IRL: How Autonomous Cargo Boats Could Disrupt The Massive Shipping Industry

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Unmanned marine vehicles will use sensors & AI to crisscross the world's oceans without a crew – potentially lowering costs & improving safety for the $334B shipping sector. Autonomous ships will not only enhance global shipping capacity (lowering transport costs and fuel consumption in the process), they can also potentially lead to safer seas: Human error accounts for over 60% of shipping accidents, according to EU data. Rolls-Royce has worked extensively in the shipping sector for decades, but launched the AAWA project as part of a broad vision to make better use of "ship intelligence" – aka the data from ships' vast networks of systems and sensors. The expenses add up: Even factoring in the much-improved fuel efficiency of greener autonomous boats, the Fraunhofer Center study found that an unmanned bulk cargo carrier may be able to reduce the cost of carrying freight by only around 3.4%.


Rolls-Royce navigates Google deal on machine learning for shipping - Internet of Business

@machinelearnbot

Rolls-Royce has signed a deal with internet giant Google in a move intended to help the British engineering company to develop autonomous ships. Under the terms of the deal, Rolls-Royce will use Google's Cloud Machine Learning Engine to further train an AI-based object classification system that it has developed, for detecting, identifying and tracking the objects that a vessel might encounter at sea. The Google Cloud Machine Learning Engine uses the same neural net-based machine intelligence software that powers many of Google's own products, such as image and voice search. The intention is for Rolls-Royce to use Google Cloud's software to create bespoke machine learning models that can interpret the large and diverse marine data sets that the engineering company has created.


The next race for autonomous vehicles? Self-driving boats

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Spurred in part by the car industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston startup Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The ocean is "a wide open space," said Sea Machines CEO Michael Johnson. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


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That's what Rolls-Royce is working on with their autonomous naval vessel concept that plans to have a 3,500 nautical-mile range. The company sees a future in the next 10 years or so where autonomous boats are out in the water for up to 100 days, eliminating the need for remote controlled ships or crews. Rolls-Royce general manager of naval electrics, automation and control, Benjamin Thorp said in a news release, "Such ships offer a way to deliver increased operational capability, reduce the risk to crew, and cut both operating and build costs." The ship is all conceptual, but the Verge reported a Norwegian company is launching an automated cargo ship next year that plans to be autonomous by 2020.


Long in the works, self-driving boats may make a splash before autonomous cars

The Japan Times

Spurred in part by the car industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston start-up Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The start-up has signed a deal with an undisclosed company to install the "world's first autonomy system on a commercial containership," Johnson said this week. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


Self-driving ships could be ready in three years

Los Angeles Times

Spurred in part by the auto industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston startup Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The startup has signed a deal with an undisclosed company to install the "world's first autonomy system on a commercial container ship," Johnson said this week. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


Self-driving boats: The next tech transportation race

Boston Herald

Spurred in part by the car industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston startup Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The ocean is "a wide open space," said Sea Machines CEO Michael Johnson. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


Unmanned 'ghost' ships could set sail as early as 2020

Daily Mail

Norway-based Yara has revealed its plans to develop the world's first all-electric and autonomous container ship that is predicted to remove 747 tons (678 tonnes) of carbon dioxide from the air by reducing diesel-powered truck haulage by 40,000 journeys a year Researchers have developed the world's first autonomous, zero-emissions cargo ship, The Yara Birkeland. But change is afoot in the maritime sector, and earlier this year the UN's International Maritime Organisation (IMO) began discussions that could allow unmanned ships to operate across oceans. Some think that autonomous ships would have fewer accidents because the majority of maritime accidents involve collisions or groundings, caused by humans. Rolls-Royce demonstrated the world's first remote-controlled, unmanned commercial ship earlier this year Rolls Royce has revealed planed for fleets of'drone ships' to ferry carry around the world - all controlled from a central'holodeck' Rolls Royce has revealed planed for fleets of'drone ships' to ferry carry around the world - all controlled from a central'holodeck'.