Marine


The next race for autonomous vehicles? Self-driving boats

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Spurred in part by the car industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston startup Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The ocean is "a wide open space," said Sea Machines CEO Michael Johnson. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


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That's what Rolls-Royce is working on with their autonomous naval vessel concept that plans to have a 3,500 nautical-mile range. The company sees a future in the next 10 years or so where autonomous boats are out in the water for up to 100 days, eliminating the need for remote controlled ships or crews. Rolls-Royce general manager of naval electrics, automation and control, Benjamin Thorp said in a news release, "Such ships offer a way to deliver increased operational capability, reduce the risk to crew, and cut both operating and build costs." The ship is all conceptual, but the Verge reported a Norwegian company is launching an automated cargo ship next year that plans to be autonomous by 2020.


Long in the works, self-driving boats may make a splash before autonomous cars

The Japan Times

Spurred in part by the car industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston start-up Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The start-up has signed a deal with an undisclosed company to install the "world's first autonomy system on a commercial containership," Johnson said this week. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


Self-driving ships could be ready in three years

Los Angeles Times

Spurred in part by the auto industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston startup Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The startup has signed a deal with an undisclosed company to install the "world's first autonomy system on a commercial container ship," Johnson said this week. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


Self-driving boats: The next tech transportation race

Boston Herald

Spurred in part by the car industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston startup Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The ocean is "a wide open space," said Sea Machines CEO Michael Johnson. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


Unmanned 'ghost' ships could set sail as early as 2020

Daily Mail

Norway-based Yara has revealed its plans to develop the world's first all-electric and autonomous container ship that is predicted to remove 747 tons (678 tonnes) of carbon dioxide from the air by reducing diesel-powered truck haulage by 40,000 journeys a year Researchers have developed the world's first autonomous, zero-emissions cargo ship, The Yara Birkeland. But change is afoot in the maritime sector, and earlier this year the UN's International Maritime Organisation (IMO) began discussions that could allow unmanned ships to operate across oceans. Some think that autonomous ships would have fewer accidents because the majority of maritime accidents involve collisions or groundings, caused by humans. Rolls-Royce demonstrated the world's first remote-controlled, unmanned commercial ship earlier this year Rolls Royce has revealed planed for fleets of'drone ships' to ferry carry around the world - all controlled from a central'holodeck' Rolls Royce has revealed planed for fleets of'drone ships' to ferry carry around the world - all controlled from a central'holodeck'.


Spire's ship tracking satellite data makes it easier to monitor vessels from space

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Spire Global is a data analytics provider that uses information provided by a constellation of orbital nanosatellites to track ships on the high seas – a service that's valuable to maritime shipping companies and other clients. Now, thanks to general improvements in both the in-space and ground-based technology Spire uses to collect its data, it's adding two new products to its developer-oriented tools that make tracking ships at sea even easier. Ship placement, destination and direction can have huge impact in terms of how logistics and shipping companies plan their daily operations, as well as how adjacent industries, including ports, run their own businesses. Spire currently operates 40 orbital satellites, and has plans in place to roll out even more improvements to its network and data analytics via additional launches, more ground stations and more machine learning improvements over the next couple of years.


How big data will transform shipping

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In this brave, new maritime world voyage data and data from ship structures, components and machinery will be collated and used to enhance performance, productivity and, crucially, safety. "Smart ships will use voyage data and data from ship structures, components and machinery to enhance performance" This will then lead to a natural move away from fixed maintenance intervals, towards tailored predictive maintenance, which will reduce operator risk and provide improved cost efficiency. Over the next 10 to 20 years we believe ship intelligence is going to be the driving force that will determine the future of our industry, the type of ships at sea, and the competence levels required from tomorrow's seafarers." "Ship intelligence is going to be the driving force that will determine the future of the industry, the type of ships at sea, and the competence levels required from tomorrow's seafarers" Dr Sven Gerhard, Global Product Leader Hull & Marine Liabilities, AGCS, agrees that classification societies have certainly discovered the value of big data, "but they do not yet know how they are going to use it.


Self driving cargo ship to sail Norwegian seas in 2018

Daily Mail

The vessel, developed by agriculture company Yara International ASA and high-technology systems firm Kongsberg Gruppen, will be loaded and unloaded automatically using electric cranes. Researchers have developed the world's first autonomous, zero-emissions cargo ship: The Yara Birkeland. Developed by agriculture company Yara International ASA and high-technology systems firm Kongsberg Gruppen, will be capable of autonomous mooring and route planning. Yara International and Kongsberg Gruppen aren't the only companies looking to develop autonomous ships - last year, Rolls Royce revealed plans to develop fleets of'drone ships,' with the first ships developed being ferries and then cargo ships to carry cargo around the world - all controlled from a central'holodeck'.


Norway Takes Lead in Race to Build Autonomous Cargo Ships

Wall Street Journal

Petter Ostbo, Yara's head of production who leads the project, said the company would look to invest in bigger ships and use them for longer routes once international regulations are in place for crewless vessels. The International Maritime Organization, which regulates maritime travel, doesn't expect legislation governing crewless ships to be in place before 2020. Shipping executives say autonomous vessels will be popular for short sea routes, but doubt they will replace oceangoing ships that move thousands of containers across continents with an average crew size of around 25. "When the bridge goes on land, it will be something like flying a drone from a command center," said Kongsberg's chief executive, Geir Haoy.