Agricultural Chemicals

Digging Deep: Harnessing the Power of Soil Microbes for More Sustainable Farming


This farm in Arkansas may soon be the most scientifically advanced farm in the world. There's a farm in Arkansas growing soybeans, corn, and rice that is aiming to be the most scientifically advanced farm in the world. Soil samples are run through powerful machines to have their microbes genetically sequenced, drones are flying overhead taking hyperspectral images of the crops, and soon supercomputers will be crunching the massive volumes of data collected. Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), working with the University of Arkansas and Glennoe Farms, hope this project, which brings together molecular biology, biogeochemistry, environmental sensing technologies, and machine learning, will revolutionize agriculture and create sustainable farming practices that benefit both the environment and farms. If successful, they envision being able to reduce the need for chemical fertilizers and enhance soil carbon uptake, thus improving the long-term viability of the land, while at the same time increasing crop yields.

Indoor vertical farming in Asia and beyond: Digging deep in data - Asia News Center


And through all those millennia, farmers have literally battled the elements. They have read the seasons and bred new crop types largely through trial and error. By the late 20th century we had increased food production with mechanization, fertilizers, herbicides, pesticides, irrigation and a lot more. Today, humankind is growing more food than ever. But, here's a crucial question: How long can we keep farming like this?

5 Ways Drones Are Changing the World


Those who dream of getting an Amazon package, a prescription drug, or even a beer delivered to their doorsteps via drone might have their wishes fulfilled sooner than expected.

From identifying plant pests to picking fruit, AI is reinventing how farmers produce your food


These Indian subsistence farmers know just what to do: Pull out their smartphones and take their picture. The farmers then upload the images with GPS locations to a cloud-based artificial intelligence (AI) app named Plantix. The app identifies the crop type in the image and spits out a diagnosis of a disease, pest or nutrient deficiency. Plantix also aids farmers by recommending targeted biological or chemical treatments for ailing plants, reducing the volume of agrochemicals in groundwater and waterways that can result from overuse or incorrect application of herbicides and pesticides.

Robots are helping researchers work to end world hunger


At a time when many people are concerned about the potentially negative impact of robotics on individuals' lives and livelihoods, researchers at the University of Missouri are relying on robots for a project that's decidedly pro-human: fighting world hunger. Robots are helping scientists track crops and how they grow in drought situations. Knowledge gained from the 3D images and data the robots create and collect could help agriculturists develop corn that is more drought resistant. An executive guide to the technology and market drivers behind the $135 billion robotics market. To develop 3D images of corn plants in the field, the research team developed a combination approach of a mobile sensor tower and autonomous robot vehicles equipped with three levels of sensors and an additional robotic arm.

Optimal Crop Selection Using Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithms

AI Magazine

Soil characteristics are extremely important when determining yield potential. Fertilization and liming are commonly used to adapt soils to the nutritional requirements of the crops to be cultivated. Planting the crop that will best fit the soil characteristics is an interesting alternative to minimize the need for soil treatment, reducing costs and potential environmental damages. In addition, farmers usually look for investments that offer the greatest potential earnings with the least possible risks. Regarding the objectives to be considered, the crop-selection problem may be difficult to solve using traditional tools.

Artificial intelligence helps farmers spot diseased corn and soybean faster.


His team provides crop protection services such as fertilizers and herbicides to farmers across Illinois.

Deep Learning for Business Coursera


For the course "Deep Learning for Business," the first module is "Deep Learning Products & Services," which starts with the lecture "Future Industry Evolution & Artificial Intelligence" that explains past, current, and future industry evolutions and how DL (Deep Learning) and ML (Machine Learning) technology will be used in almost every aspect of future industry in the near future. The following lectures look into the hottest DL and ML products and services that are exciting the business world. Then the Amazon Echo and Echo Dot products are introduced along with the Alexa cloud based DL personal assistant that uses ASR (Automated Speech Recognition) and NLU (Natural Language Understanding) technology. The next lecture focuses on LettuceBot, which is a DL system that plants lettuce seeds with automatic fertilizer and herbicide nozzles control. Then the computer vision based DL blood cells analysis diagnostic system Athelas is introduced followed by the introduction of a classical and symphonic music composing DL system named AIVA (Artificial Intelligence Virtual Artist).

Artificial intelligence helps farmers spot diseased corn and soybean faster.


If farmers want to know how healthy crops are, perhaps they shouldn't trust their eyes. Matt Free -- a manager at Evergreen FS, an agriculture company -- learned that lesson this year. His team provides crop protection services such as fertilizers and herbicides to farmers across Illinois. After a year-long test of a variety of new technologies, Evergreen FS found artificial intelligence could identify trouble, such as fungus growth and water shortages, in corn and soybean crops weeks before the naked eye would ever realize it. The tech, which comes from startup Ceres Imaging, offers farmers an AI analysis of photos taken from planes flying several thousand feet above fields.

Tech-savvy Chinese farmers use drones to spray pesticide

Daily Mail

Farmers in China have caught up with the country's booming drone trend and started using unmanned aircraft to spray pesticide onto the fields. Not only that, a team of villagers in central China recently bought 30 of these bug-zapping vehicles in hope of turning it into a new business. Zhu Xiwang and his neighbours said they hoped their squad of agri-drones to could help them start a pest-killing service, according to, an affiliation to People's Daily Online. This £24.8K flat pack folding home takes just SIX HOURS to build Pictures show the 30 drones lining up on a field, ready to take off. The unmanned aircraft, known by its model name MG-1S, is produced by Shenzhen-based Da Jiang Innovation, one of the largest drone manufacturers in China.