Materials


How AI-driven Search Empowers the Digital Workplace

#artificialintelligence

If finding information in the workplace is a manual hunt-and-peck exercise, and you keep adding more digital information to the mix, your employees are getting frustrated, and even worse, disengaged. After all, they are used to easy, intuitive search experiences in their personal lives with tools like Google, Alexa, and Siri. Yet when it comes to the workplace, the systems don't deliver that ease of use. Get the eBook How AI-driven Search Empowers the Digital Workplace to learn how AI technologies and cognitive search deliver a personalized, highly relevant experience for information access in the enterprise, and help you engage a modern workforce.


O.K., Computer, Tell Me What This Smells Like

@machinelearnbot

Our sense of smell is gloriously specific. The mellow aroma of butter and flour rising from warm pie crust, the synthetic bite of fresh paint, the familiar odor of a new car--when we get a whiff of something, we know immediately what it is. But this natural delicacy of perception far exceeds our ability to tell how a given molecule, drawn on a blackboard and considered as an abstraction, will strike our noses. Two substances with completely different chemical shapes might smell almost identical, while two others with similar shapes might smell nothing alike. That's in direct contrast to, say, color vision; by examining the wavelengths of light bouncing off a rose or a child's hat, a scientist can say that a human will see them as red or blue (unless the human happens to be color-blind--though, even then, the shade is predictable).


Data Mining vs. Machine Learning: What's The Difference? - Import.io

@machinelearnbot

Data mining isn't a new invention that came with the digital age. The concept has been around for over a century, but came into greater public focus in the 1930s. According to Hacker Bits, one of the first modern moments of data mining occurred in 1936, when Alan Turing introduced the idea of a universal machine that could perform computations similar to those of modern-day computers. Forbes also reported on Turing's development of the "Turing Test" in 1950 to determine if a computer has real intelligence or not. To pass his test, a computer needed to fool a human into believing it was also human.


Real World Deep Learning: Neural Networks for Smart Crops

@machinelearnbot

To produce high-quality food and feed a growing world population with the given amount of arable land in a sustainable manner, we must develop new methods of sustainable farming that increase yield while minimizing chemical inputs such as fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides. I and my colleagues are working on a robotics-centered approaches to address this grand challenge. My name is Andres Milioto, and I am a research assistant and Ph.D. student in robotics at the Photogrammetry and Robotics Lab (http://www.ipb.uni-bonn.de) Together with Philipp Lottes, Nived Chebrolu, and our supervisor Prof. Dr. Cyrill Stachniss we are developing an adaptable ground and aerial robots for smart farming in the context of the EC-funded project "Flourish" (http://flourish-project.eu/), where we collaborate with several other Universities and industry partners across Europe. The Flourish consortium is committed to develop new robotic methods for sustainable farming that aim at minimizing chemical inputs such as fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides in order to reduce the side-effects on our environment.


Data Mining vs. Machine Learning: What's The Difference? - Import.io

@machinelearnbot

Data mining isn't a new invention that came with the digital age. The concept has been around for over a century, but came into greater public focus in the 1930s. According to Hacker Bits, one of the first modern moments of data mining occurred in 1936, when Alan Turing introduced the idea of a universal machine that could perform computations similar to those of modern-day computers. Forbes also reported on Turing's development of the "Turing Test" in 1950 to determine if a computer has real intelligence or not. To pass his test, a computer needed to fool a human into believing it was also human.


Montreal AI startup Element AI hires ex-IBM chief to lead product and strategy efforts

#artificialintelligence

Hot Montreal artificial intelligence startup Element AI has scored its third high-profile hire in the past month, recruiting former IBM chief innovation officer Linda Bernardi to join as its chief product and strategy officer. The Seattle-based Ms. Bernardi follows Denis Therien, McGill University's former vice-principal of research and international relations, and Valérie Bécaert, former director of partnerships with Montreal's Institute of Data Valorization, who joined Element AI last month. The Element AI moves come after the hiring of top-ranked Canadian AI research scientists by giant U.S. tech companies, including Facebook, Google and Uber Technologies, and the sale of a handful of AI startups to the likes of Microsoft. In the face of growing concerns over the loss of talent to these foreign heavyweights, Ottawa and the provinces have committed hundreds of millions of dollars to new AI institutes in Montreal, Toronto and Edmonton. Element, co-founded by University of Montreal professor and deep-learning pioneer Yoshua Bengio, has quickly emerged as one of the most heavily financed Canadian AI startups.


Mussel-inspired plastic could make self-repairing body armour

New Scientist

A new material inspired by mussels is flexing its muscles. It can stretch without snapping and repair its own molecular bonds, so it could be useful in robot joints that lift heavy objects, or for packaging to protect delicate cargo from accidental falls. Mussels and some other molluscs hang onto solid surfaces using an adhesive protein and tough, plasticky fibres, which are extremely strong and can repair themselves when a few molecular bonds within them are broken. For a mussel, these stretchy yet strong fibres come in handy when a wave hits. Megan Valentine at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and her colleagues created a plastic with these same properties by mimicking the chemistry the mussels use.


The coal miner who became a data miner

@machinelearnbot

Can coal make a comeback under President Trump? In her old life, it was not unusual for Annie Evans to find herself standing in the pouring rain outside of a coal mine at three in the morning, staring down a broken piece of equipment. A heavy maintenance superintendent for a surface coal mine in Elgin, Texas, Evans was responsible for figuring out how to patch or replace outdated parts of a field delivery system that ferried coal from the mine to a plant. Each minute of downtime could cost the company as much as $170. Now the third-generation coal miner gets her adrenaline rush sitting indoors on a soft swivel chair, fixing code on a computer screen.


Robotic underwater miners can go where humans can't

New Scientist

The scene around the flooded Whitehill Yeo pit in Devon, UK, resembles a lunar landscape. Until it was abandoned just a few years ago, an endless stream of diesel trucks carried china clay out of the mine seven days a week. But don't be fooled by the silence: this is very much an active site. It's just that all the excavation is happening deep beneath the placid waters. This is a test bed, the first, for a new type of mining by underwater robots.


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@machinelearnbot

Samsung's revamped Bixby takes on Amazon Alexa - Samsung announced it is upgrading its Bixby digital assistant and making it available for a range of connected devices, setting up a clash with Amazon's Alexa and others competing for leadership in artificial intelligence. The South Korean electronics giant, which is the world's biggest smartphone maker, launched Bixby last year but only for its own flagship Galaxy handsets....