Government & the Courts


Machine learning algorithm can predict Supreme Court outcomes

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The algorithm analysed the US Supreme Court Database, which holds data on court cases dating back to 1791. They used the US Supreme Court Database, which holds information on court cases dating back to 1791. Based on this data, the algorithm could correctly predict 70.2 per cent of the court's 28,000 decisions, and 71.9 per cent of the justices' 240,000 votes from 1816 to 2015. The algorithm analysed the US Supreme Court Database, which holds information on court cases dating back to 1791.


Using AI to sentence criminals is a 'dangerous idea'

Daily Mail

Earlier this month, researchers unveiled an AI computer that could predict the results of Supreme Court trials better than a human. Earlier this month, researchers unveiled an AI computer that could predict the results of Supreme Court trials better than a human. Technology has brought many benefits to the court room, ranging from photocopiers to DNA fingerprinting and sophisticated surveillance techniques. While technology has brought many benefits to the court room, ranging from photocopiers to DNA fingerprinting and sophisticated surveillance techniques, Mr Markou says that that doesn't mean any technology is an improvement Recent work by Joanna Bryson, professor of computer science at the University of Bath, highlights that even the most'sophisticated' AIs can inherit the racial and gender biases of those who create them.


Artificial intelligence prevails at predicting Supreme Court decisions

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Artificial intelligence can predict Supreme Court decisions better than some experts. Decision outcomes included whether the court reversed a lower court's decision and how each justice voted. The model then looked at the features of each case for that year and predicted decision outcomes. "Every time we've kept score, it hasn't been a terribly pretty picture for humans," says the study's lead author, Daniel Katz, a law professor at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago.


Artificial intelligence prevails at predicting Supreme Court decisions

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence can predict Supreme Court decisions better than some experts. Decision outcomes included whether the court reversed a lower court's decision and how each justice voted. The model then looked at the features of each case for that year and predicted decision outcomes. "Every time we've kept score, it hasn't been a terribly pretty picture for humans," says the study's lead author, Daniel Katz, a law professor at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago.


Southern rail strike: GTR taking legal case to Supreme Court

BBC News

The owner of Southern rail says it will take the union Aslef to the Supreme Court over its industrial action on the train network. Southern's owner Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR) lost a court case and an appeal last year over halting strikes. Southern has insisted it will not back down in the dispute over who should open and close train doors. In a statement GTR said it was "determined to protect its passengers and its business from unlawful industrial action".


How police use AI to hunt drug dealers on Instagram

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New York state's top cops want to use machine-learning algorithms to detect drug dealers on social media networks like Instagram, a trend that "has become a severe problem in recent years," according to researchers from the University of Rochester and the New York Attorney General's office. Using social media to sell drugs began years ago and continues to this day. The New York Attorney General's office co-authored new research on algorithms meant to examine millions of Instagram posts, spotlight drug dealers, and only then pass the suspects on to human officers for further investigation. Combining all that, the classifier spits out the suspected drug dealer accounts to be manually inspected.


Amicus: And Then There Were Eight

Slate

In the lead-up to November's presidential election, Donald Trump released a list of 21 potential Supreme Court nominees in what many saw as an effort to mollify conservatives who tend to worry about these sorts of things. Now, that list has reportedly been narrowed to eight. On this episode, we sit down with William Jay, a former clerk to Justice Antonin Scalia, to discuss Scalia's possible successors.


How Artificial Intelligence Can Help the Judiciary - Yseop

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If you walked into a manufacturing plant today, the robots you see carrying out repetitive tasks are programmed by experts who literally show the machine what to do. The goal is to automate repetitive tasks and 70% of the work, free up time, and boost capacity. Across the service sector, businesses are now embracing the same mentality: use AI to do the repetitive work to boost capacity and free up time. And to get back to the legal sector, the use of AI in law would allow judges to focus on complex cases while technology focused on the routine ones, ideally going as far as writing a first draft of a ruling, which would then be reviewed and tweaked by judges before enactment.


Applying Data Science to the Supreme Court: Topic Modeling Over Time with NMF (and a D3.js bonus)

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With natural language processing, we have a pile of documents (that's Supreme Court cases in this project), and we need to get to their true essence. The process I used was TFIDF, or, Term Frequency Inverse Document Frequency. Herein lies my explanation for why NMF (non-negative matrix factorization). It turns out that LDA is known to be not great for pulling out true meaning from documents with similar language (such as 22,000 cases with a ton of legal term overlap).


10 predictions about how IBM's Watson will impact the legal profession

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This week, we drill down into one likely source of change, IBM's Watson. As part of its thoughtful launch to deliver Watson's cognitive computing capabilities through services, IBM has begun to partner with different companies in different fields, including law. Many imagine Watson might displace lawyers for legal reasoning. While correctly predicting the Supreme Court is not a particularly commercially important activity, this effort points to how such techniques might be applied to other elements of law.