Government & the Courts


Artificial intelligence prevails at predicting Supreme Court decisions

@machinelearnbot

Artificial intelligence can predict Supreme Court decisions better than some experts. Decision outcomes included whether the court reversed a lower court's decision and how each justice voted. The model then looked at the features of each case for that year and predicted decision outcomes. "Every time we've kept score, it hasn't been a terribly pretty picture for humans," says the study's lead author, Daniel Katz, a law professor at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago.


Big data is used to sentence criminals, can algorithms predict future risk?

#artificialintelligence

When the judge weighed Loomis' sentence, he considered an array of evidence, including the results of an automated risk assessment tool called COMPAS. Then, developers create a statistical algorithm that weighs stronger predictors more heavily than weaker ones. Algorithms such as COMPAS cannot make predictions about individual defendants, because data-driven risk tools are based on group statistics. The Supreme Court might helpfully opine on these legal and scientific issues by deciding to hear the Loomis case.


Machine learning algorithm can predict Supreme Court outcomes

#artificialintelligence

The algorithm analysed the US Supreme Court Database, which holds data on court cases dating back to 1791. They used the US Supreme Court Database, which holds information on court cases dating back to 1791. Based on this data, the algorithm could correctly predict 70.2 per cent of the court's 28,000 decisions, and 71.9 per cent of the justices' 240,000 votes from 1816 to 2015. The algorithm analysed the US Supreme Court Database, which holds information on court cases dating back to 1791.


Using AI to sentence criminals is a 'dangerous idea'

Daily Mail

Earlier this month, researchers unveiled an AI computer that could predict the results of Supreme Court trials better than a human. Earlier this month, researchers unveiled an AI computer that could predict the results of Supreme Court trials better than a human. Technology has brought many benefits to the court room, ranging from photocopiers to DNA fingerprinting and sophisticated surveillance techniques. While technology has brought many benefits to the court room, ranging from photocopiers to DNA fingerprinting and sophisticated surveillance techniques, Mr Markou says that that doesn't mean any technology is an improvement Recent work by Joanna Bryson, professor of computer science at the University of Bath, highlights that even the most'sophisticated' AIs can inherit the racial and gender biases of those who create them.


Artificial intelligence prevails at predicting Supreme Court decisions

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence can predict Supreme Court decisions better than some experts. Decision outcomes included whether the court reversed a lower court's decision and how each justice voted. The model then looked at the features of each case for that year and predicted decision outcomes. "Every time we've kept score, it hasn't been a terribly pretty picture for humans," says the study's lead author, Daniel Katz, a law professor at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago.


Artificial intelligence prevails at predicting Supreme Court decisions

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence can predict Supreme Court decisions better than some experts. Decision outcomes included whether the court reversed a lower court's decision and how each justice voted. The model then looked at the features of each case for that year and predicted decision outcomes. "Every time we've kept score, it hasn't been a terribly pretty picture for humans," says the study's lead author, Daniel Katz, a law professor at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago.


Artificial Intelligence and the Supreme Court

#artificialintelligence

Algorithm 4 is a version of "originalism" that can be applied to civil rights questions such as the fundamental right to vote. Clicking on the icon which looks like the emancipation proclamation with an X drawn through it allows the Court to ignore everything that has happened since the adoption of the constitution in its original form. STAR-ASK then allows the Court to conclude that the Thirteenth and Fourteenth amendments to the constitution, the statutes enacted pursuant to those amendments, and the bloody civil war that our country fought to outlaw badges of slavery do not count anymore. STAR-ASK has already established that money talks; originalism confirms that those most disadvantaged by our nation's history should face the most restrictions on voting and other constitutionally protected rights.


A General Approach for Predicting the Behavior of the Supreme Court of the United States by Daniel Martin Katz, Michael James Bommarito, Josh Blackman :: SSRN

#artificialintelligence

Using only data available prior to decision, our model outperforms null (baseline) models at both the justice and case level under both parametric and non-parametric tests. Over nearly two centuries, we achieve 70.2% accuracy at the case outcome level and 71.9% at the justice vote level. More recently, over the past century, we outperform an in-sample optimized null model by nearly 5%. Our performance is consistent with, and improves on the general level of prediction demonstrated by prior work; however, our model is distinctive because it can be applied out-of-sample to the entire past and future of the Court, not a single term.


Southern rail strike: GTR taking legal case to Supreme Court

BBC News

The owner of Southern rail says it will take the union Aslef to the Supreme Court over its industrial action on the train network. Southern's owner Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR) lost a court case and an appeal last year over halting strikes. Southern has insisted it will not back down in the dispute over who should open and close train doors. In a statement GTR said it was "determined to protect its passengers and its business from unlawful industrial action".


How police use AI to hunt drug dealers on Instagram

#artificialintelligence

New York state's top cops want to use machine-learning algorithms to detect drug dealers on social media networks like Instagram, a trend that "has become a severe problem in recent years," according to researchers from the University of Rochester and the New York Attorney General's office. Using social media to sell drugs began years ago and continues to this day. The New York Attorney General's office co-authored new research on algorithms meant to examine millions of Instagram posts, spotlight drug dealers, and only then pass the suspects on to human officers for further investigation. Combining all that, the classifier spits out the suspected drug dealer accounts to be manually inspected.