Multiple Sclerosis


Artificial intelligence could build new drugs faster than any human team

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Atomwise, a San Francisco-based startup and Y Combinator alum, has built a system it calls AtomNet (pdf), which attempts to generate potential drugs for diseases like Ebola and multiple sclerosis. Atomwise's system only generates potential drugs--the compounds created by the neural network aren't guaranteed to be safe, and need to go through the same drug trials and safety checks as anything else on the market. The company believes that the speed at which it can generate trial-ready drugs based on previous safe molecular interactions is what sets it apart. Alexander Levy, the company's COO and cofounder, said that AtomNet learns the interactions between molecules much like artificial intelligence learns to recognize images.


Flipboard on Flipboard

#artificialintelligence

Atomwise, a San Francisco-based startup and Y Combinator alum, has built a system it calls AtomNet (pdf), which attempts to generate potential drugs for diseases like Ebola and multiple sclerosis. Atomwise's system only generates potential drugs--the compounds created by the neural network aren't guaranteed to be safe, and need to go through the same drug trials and safety checks as anything else on the market. The company believes that the speed at which it can generate trial-ready drugs based on previous safe molecular interactions is what sets it apart. Alexander Levy, the company's COO and cofounder, said that AtomNet learns the interactions between molecules much like artificial intelligence learns to recognize images.


Scientists create smarter mice with 'half-human' brains

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Mice injected with human brain cells grow to have'half human brains' that make them smarter than other rodents, scientists have found. Dr Goldman, whose work is published in the Journal of Neuroscience, instead believes mice with these hybrid brains could prove valuable in studying neurological conditions like schizophrenia and testing new treatments for diseases like multiple sclerosis. In their most recent study Dr Goldman and his colleagues injected human cells into the brains of mice who were missing the myelin sheaths that insulate their neurons. In their most recent study Dr Goldman and his colleagues injected human cells into the brains of mice who were missing the myelin sheaths that insulate their neurons.


Identifying Key Symptoms Differentiating Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome from Multiple Sclerosis

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The current study compared self-report symptom data of patients with ME or CFS with those with MS. The self-report data is from the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire, and participants were recruited to take the questionnaire online. Data were analyzed using a machine learning technique called decision trees. Our findings support the use of machine learning to further explore the unique nature of these different chronic diseases.