Stem Cells


From bone marrow transplant to winning medals

BBC News

Innovation in this area is being helped by the UK National Health Service's (NHS) Electronic Prescription Service (EPS), which has been rolled out over the last few years. It enables doctors to send prescriptions direct to pharmacies electronically without any need for paper. Such efficiencies have saved the NHS £137m; doctors' practices £328m; pharmacies £59m; and patients £75m, between 2013 and 2016, NHS Digital says. So his company spent three-and-a-half years building a platform, PharmacyOS, to handle every aspect of the repeat prescription process: prescribing, dispensing, delivering, billing, handling insurance claims, as well as pill-taking monitoring.


#Artificialintelligence can predict the success of IVF embryos better than do...

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Science Daily explores the issue in more depth (4 July 2017): "However, because the artificial intelligence system is a technique which analyses the embryo through mathematical variables, it offers low subjectivity and high repeatability, making embryo classification more consistent. "Nevertheless," said Professor Rocha, "the artificial intelligence system must be based on learning from a human being -- that is, the experienced embryologists who set the standards of assessment to train the system."" See also EurekAlert (4 July 2017): "The system utilizes a sophisticated architecture of multi-class deep neural networks (DNNs) and DNN ensembles trained on thousands of samples of carefully selected cells of multiple classes: embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, progenitor stem cells, adult stem cells and adult cells to recognize the class and embryonic state of the sample, achieving high accuracy in simulations. The sample sets were augmented with carefully selected and manually curated data from public repositories coming from multiple experiments and generated on different platforms.


Machine learning predicts the look of stem cells

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The Allen Cell Explorer, produced by the Allen Institute for Cell Science in Seattle, Washington, includes a growing library of more than 6,000 pictures of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) -- key components of which glow thanks to fluorescent markers that highlight specific genes. Rick Horwitz, director of the Allen Institute for Cell Science, says that the institute's images may hasten progress in stem cell research, cancer research and drug development by revealing unexpected aspects of cellular structure. The Allen Institute's visual emphasis on stem cells dovetails with a number of efforts to catalogue other aspects of cells. Aviv Regev, a computational biologist at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, who is working on the Human Cell Atlas, says that the Allen Cell Explorer complements her project by focusing on the look of cellular features as opposed to how genes, RNA and proteins interact within the cell.


Human Chimera Research's Huge (and Thorny) Potential

WIRED

The recent smear campaign against Planned Parenthood's fetal tissue practices is just the latest example of how these ongoing attacks have had a chilling effect on laws that might advance human developmental biology research. Human chimeras are mixtures of human cells with rodent, pig, or other animal embryos. To illustrate the complexity, we can look at the example of a recent study in which scientists created chimeric mice with a type of human brain cell called glia; these cells were present in a high abundance in the mouse brains. Other tough questions are popping up as well in related areas of cutting-edge research using human pluripotent stem cells.


The first AI system for human embryonic state analysis is available for testing - Scienmag

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Tuesday, July 5, 2016, Baltimore, MD – At Mensa Annual Gathering 2016, the annual event of the largest and oldest high IQ society transpiring in San Diego from June 29th to July 3rd, Dr. Michael West, CEO of BioTime, Inc announced the launch of a beta version of Embryonic.AI, an artificially intelligent system for analyzing the embryonic state of human cell samples using gene expression data. The system utilizes a sophisticated architecture of multi-class deep neural networks (DNNs) and DNN ensembles trained on thousands of samples of carefully selected cells of multiple classes: embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, progenitor stem cells, adult stem cells and adult cells to recognize the class and embryonic state of the sample, achieving high accuracy in simulations. To design and implement the DNN architectures, BioTime partnered with the Pharmaceutical Artificial Intelligence (Pharma.AI) division of Insilico Medicine, Inc., a Baltimore-based bioinformatics company specializing in biomarker and drug development for aging and age-related diseases. Recently Insilico Medicine published several key papers on applying deep learning techniques to biomedical applications in influential peer-reviewed journals including "Deep learning applications for predicting pharmacological properties of drugs and drug repurposing using transcriptomic data" in "Molecular Pharmaceutics" and ACS publication.


Inhabitat's Week in Green: Self-driving Uber cars, and more!

Engadget

For starters, scientists developed a breakthrough photovoltaic cell that set a new world record for efficiency. The Mistbox is a new device that uses solar energy to cut down on summer cooling costs. Water is another pressing issue, and this week a team of scientists developed a paper-thin water filter that can remove bacteria as well as viruses at an affordable price. In other design and health news, researchers developed a new stem cell therapy that could cure blindness, and a UK man received a futuristic bionic arm with a USB port and built-in flashlight.


Putting human stem cells in animal embryos? The NIH should get on board.

Los Angeles Times

We are, medically, on the cusp of being able to save these lives in new ways: repairing failing organs with new genes or stem cells, building mechanical organs and growing replacement organs. It seemed to prove that our sense of empathy, our basic humanity, could overcome prejudice and bridge seemingly irreconcilable differences. It seemed to prove that our sense of empathy, our basic humanity, could overcome prejudice and bridge seemingly irreconcilable differences. Experiments are regulated by embryonic stem cell research oversight committees (or, in California, by very similar stem cell research oversight committees).