Sex Education


Why some doctors are questioning Trump's new birth control rules

PBS NewsHour

The Trump administration's new birth control rule is raising questions among some doctors and researchers. WASHINGTON -- The Trump administration's new birth control rule is raising questions among some doctors and researchers, who say it overlooks known benefits of contraception while selectively citing data that raise doubts about effectiveness and safety. Here's a look at examples from the Trump administration's birth control rules that are raising questions: Emergency contraception is birth control for use after unprotected sex, often called the "morning-after pill." The Trump administration's rule takes issue with the science behind the Obama-era decision to require most employers to cover birth control as preventive care.


Critics Say Trump Birth Control Rule Ignores Science

U.S. News

FILE - In this Aug. 26, 2016, file photo, a one-month dosage of hormonal birth control pills is displayed in Sacramento, Calif. The Trump administration's new birth control rule is raising questions among some doctors and researchers. They say it overlooks known benefits of contraception while selectively citing data that raise doubts about effectiveness and safety. Recently issued rules allow more employers to opt out of covering birth control as a preventive benefit for women under former President Barack Obama's health care law.


Leaked Birth Control Rule Would Broaden Religious Exemption

U.S. News

But the mandate has drawn strong and sustained opposition from social conservatives, who see it as an infringement on freedom of conscience. The Obama administration exempted houses of worship, and set up a workaround for religiously affiliated nonprofits, such as hospitals, universities and social service organizations. The Supreme Court later ruled that closely held private companies were also eligible for the workaround, through which the government arranges contraceptive coverage for the affected women employees.


9 incredible ways we're using drones for social good

Mashable

From edible drones delivering lifesaving assistance to rural communities to quadcopters tracking illegal logging in rainforests, here are just a few of the recent ways people have used drones for social good. Last year, a tech company called Lung Biotechnology PBC acquired 1,000 of EHang's drones, capable of carrying humans, for its Manufactured Organ Transport vehicle system (MOTH). In Ghana, the United Nations Population Fund (the U.N.'s arm in charge of improving family planning in the developing world) is flying drones to deliver birth control pills, condoms, and other medical supplies to people in remote regions, where there is little-to-no access to contraceptives. In 2015, four women's rights groups launched drones to deliver abortion pills from Germany across the border to Poland, where women were only allowed to have legal abortions in cases of rape or incest.


A Smarter Way to Compare Birth Control Methods

WIRED

Then comes Planned Parenthood's general information page about birth control methods--it's unwieldy and text-heavy, putting the burden on the reader to click through every page from top to bottom, or to know exactly what they're looking for. It's easy to find sites listing efficacy rates and side effects, but you rarely get a sense of what it's like to live with a given method of birth control every day. "There's a lack of curation and quality and accuracy of information that women can find about birth control options online," says Christine Dehlendorf, director of the Program in Woman-Centered Contraception at UC San Francisco. Iodine asks users questions with Google Consumer Surveys, which function kind of like ad veils on online content.


Artificial Intelligence Protects First Responders, How Birth Control Is Stopping the Spread of Disease and More

#artificialintelligence

This NASA-Developed A.I. Could Help Save Firefighters' Lives, Smithsonian Magazine Disorienting scenes where a single move can be deadly is a common experience for both space rovers and firefighters. The Guardian A New York City subway rat carries a host of dangerous contagions, and its reproductive capacity -- up to 15,000 offspring in a year -- spread disease through city sewers and alleyways. Generational Poverty: Trying to Solve Philly's Most Enduring Problem, Philadelphia Magazine Can Mattie McQueen, an unemployed 52-year-old raising three grandchildren in a largely unfurnished apartment, escape the destitution that's dogged her ancestors since the postbellum years?


Condoms By Drone: A New Way To Get Birth Control To Remote Areas

NPR

A drone takes a practice flight in Virginia with medical supplies -- part of a project to evaluate the flying machines for use in humanitarian crises. A drone takes a practice flight in Virginia with medical supplies -- part of a project to evaluate the flying machines for use in humanitarian crises. A group of public health experts, local health authorities and private-sector partners dreamed up the idea in 2014 when trying to figure out ways to improve access to contraception for women in the hardest-to-reach areas of sub-Saharan Africa. Access to birth control, reproductive health information and other services for women of childbearing age is a massive problem in this region, where fewer than 20 percent of women use modern contraceptives.