Curriculum



Rise of AI Demands Project-Based Learning Getting Smart

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) is on the rise. Life with smart machines is rapidly affecting the way we live and work. A visual signal is the number of companies mentioning it. Kevin Jones, a cancer researcher, describes his work as "taking a bath in uncertainty and unknowns and exceptions and outlie...


AI could be the future maestro of music education

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Music is a universal language that can bring people together from all over the world. As emerging technologies help us communicate better, artificial intelligence is beginning to overtake our hearts, minds, and even ears. AI is opening up a world that users can automate, personalize, and learn from...


73 Mind-Blowing Implications of a Driverless Future

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I originally wrote and published a version of this article in September 2016. Since then, quite a bit has happened, further cementing my view that these changes are coming and that the implications will be even more substantial. I decided it was time to update this article with some additional ideas...


SignAll is slowly but surely building a sign language translation platform

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Translating is difficult work, the more so the further two languages are from one another. French to Spanish? Not a problem. Ancient Greek to Esperanto? Considerably harder. But sign language is a unique case, and translating it uniquely difficult, because it is fundamentally different from spoken a...


Learn About Artificial Intelligence While You Get an MBA

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"AI is transforming everything about the way the world does business, so any aspiring business leader will be better prepared by understanding where we're headed," Josh Tyler, executive vice president of engineering and design at Course Hero, an online learning platform, said via email.


Artificial intelligence to enhance Australian judiciary system

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Sentences handed down by artificial intelligence would be fairer, more efficient, transparent and accurate than those of sitting judges, according to Swinburne researchers. Dean of Swinburne Law School, Professor Dan Hunter, and Swinburne researcher Professor Mirko Bagaric say artificial intelligence (AI) could improve sentencing procedures by removing emotional bias and human error. In a paper for the Criminal Law Journal, Professors Bagaric and Hunter argue that AI sentencing would better identify, sort and calibrate all the variables associated with sentencing, including criminal history, education, drug/alcohol use, emotional motivations and employment. The pair argue that sentencing decisions are often influenced by more than 200 considerations, many of which are variables which have been established prior to court hearings. Professor Bagaric says subconscious bias plays a large part in sentencing in which judges or magistrates hand down harder penalties to offenders of a particular race or background. He says that AI has the potential to make sentencing fairer, as it is incapable of adopting any emotional bias or prejudice towards people of certain profiles. "It would make sentencing more transparent and quicker," says Professor Bagaric. "It would also eliminate judicial subconscious bias in sentencing that results in people of certain profiles, such as indigenous offenders, being sentenced more harshly."


73 Mind-Blowing Implications of a Driverless Future

#artificialintelligence

I originally wrote and published a version of this article in September 2016. Since then, quite a bit has happened, further cementing my view that these changes are coming and that the implications will be even more substantial. I decided it was time to update this article with some additional ideas...


HappyNumbers uses AI to augment math teachers, not replace them Future of Learning

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The e-learning or digital content ecosystem is quickly evolving, and mobile learning, multi-device content, mobile responsive content (call it what you will) is here to stay. #1: Define What "Mobile" Means to You--and Your Clients Mobile learning can be defined as many different types of learning experiences. #2: Decide on a Minimum Device Set Once you are clear on what mobile learning and mobile responsive mean to you, you are in a better position to decide on a minimum device set. #3: Understand Your New Design Parameters The good news: It's finally time to say goodbye to fixed screen, click-next, sleep-inducing e-learning content! #4: Adjust Your Storyboarding Process If you've been an instructional designer as long as I have, you'll have experimented with different types of storyboarding. For me, Microsoft PowerPoint works the best. Example #5: Integrate Scrolling into the Design Process If you are not careful, your instructional designers will simply transfer their fixed screen design ideas into long scrolling pages.


In The Era Of Artificial Intelligence, STEM Is Not Enough

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Amazon's Alexa is now your personal butler at the Wynn hotel in Las Vegas. Self-learning software developed by Google defeated the world's best player of the highly complex Chinese strategy game Go. IBM's Watson saved the life of a woman in Japan by correctly diagnosing her with a rare form of cancer that doctors missed. We are rapidly approaching an inflection point in human history where artificial intelligence will exceed human intelligence, and debates about humans vs. machines have become part of our common vernacular. How can we prepare our next generation of students to compete?