Macao


Worker robots that learn from mistakes

#artificialintelligence

Computer scientists at the University of Leeds are using the artificial intelligence (AI) techniques of automated planning and reinforcement learning to "train" a robot to find an object in a cluttered space, such as a warehouse shelf or in a fridge -- and move it. The aim is to develop robotic autonomy, so the machine can assess the unique circumstances presented in a task and find a solution -- akin to a robot transferring skills and knowledge to a new problem. The Leeds researchers are presenting their findings today (Monday, November 4) at the International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems in Macau, China. The big challenge is that in a confined area, a robotic arm may not be able to grasp an object from above. Instead it has to plan a sequence of moves to reach the target object, perhaps by manipulating other items out of the way.


#IROS2019 live coverage and IROS TV

Robohub

The 2019 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (#IROS2019) is being held in Macau this week. The theme this year is "robots connecting people". The conference accepted 1,127 papers for oral presentation, 148 late breaking news posters, and 41 workshops and tutorials. For those who can't make it in person, or can't possibly see everything, IROS is launching IROS TV, an onsite conference television channel featuring a new episode daily that is screened around the conference venue and online. The TV shows profile the research of scientists, educators, and practitioners in robotics, and provide an opportunity to learn about advances in robotics.


Learning from mistakes and transferable skills - the attributes for a worker robot

#artificialintelligence

Practise makes perfect – it is an adage that has helped humans become highly dexterous and now it is an approach that is being applied to robots. Computer scientists at the University of Leeds are using the artificial intelligence (AI) techniques of automated planning and reinforcement learning to "train" a robot to find an object in a cluttered space, such as a warehouse shelf or in a fridge – and move it. The aim is to develop robotic autonomy, so the machine can assess the unique circumstances presented in a task and find a solution – akin to a robot transferring skills and knowledge to a new problem. The Leeds researchers are presenting their findings today (Monday, November 4) at the International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems in Macau, China. The big challenge is that in a confined area, a robotic arm may not be able to grasp an object from above.


MIT Researchers Taught Autonomous Cars to See Around Corners

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Researchers at MIT are helping autonomous cars deliver on the promise of safer roads with a new trick that lets driverless vehicles see around corners to pre-emptively spot other vehicles or moving hazards that human drivers would never see coming. There have been several attempts to make cameras that are able to see around corners, including other MIT researchers who revealed a system that can shine light into a room from the outside, capture the light that's bounced back, and then process the results to calculate a 3D model of objects inside that are otherwise hidden from human observers. It required a special camera, however, including lasers and other hardware that would inevitably increase the cost of an autonomous vehicle, which would, in turn, hurt sales. You didn't think all these carmakers are developing driverless cars for fun, did you? The new approach to spotting oncoming hazards around corners is being presented at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems in Macau, China, next week, and it builds and improves on an earlier system called ShadowCam that was developed a few years prior.


#IJCAI in tweets – tutorials and workshops day 2

Robohub

Here's our daily update in tweets, live from IJCAI (International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence) in Macau. Like yesterday, we'll be covering tutorials and workshops. Now attending the #tutorial "Argumentation and Machine Learning: When the Whole is Greater than the Sum of its Parts" by @CeruttiFederico, & learning about #ML mechanisms that create, annotate, analyze & evaluate arguments expressed in natural language.#AI Now: "Dialogues with Socially Aware Robot Agents – Knowledge & Reasoning using Natural Language," an invited #IJCAI2019 talk by Prof. Kristiina Jokinen Her start: "The quality of #intelligence possessed by humans and #AI is fundamentally different."#Bridging2019 On his second slide: #AGI "needs fresh methods with cognitive architectures and philosophy of mind."#AI


Live coverage of #IJCAI2019

Robohub

IJCAI, the 28th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, is happening from the 10th to 16th August in Macao, China. We'll be posting updates throughout the week thanks to the AIhub Ambassadors on the ground. You can follow the tweets at #IJCAI2019 or below.


#IJCAI2019 in tweets – tutorials and workshops

Robohub

The first two days at IJCAI (International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence) in Macau were focussed on workshops and tutorials. First demo at #ijcai2019: grad students are still superior to robots at reception desks pic.twitter.com/49beH9qBcl


Macau Regulator Cracks Down on Casinos' Use of Artificial Intelligence

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Earlier in the summer, it was announced that some casinos in Macau had begun using facial recognition software.


Macau Casinos Implement AI Technology to Identify Biggest Losers

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Macau casinos have been rolling out artificial intelligence (AI) technologies in order to monitor habits of patrons and quickly identify those individuals who are likely to spend, and lose, big. The eyes in the skies of Macau casinos are upgrading their capabilities with artificial intelligence. Make no mistake, the AI implementations aren't tailored to protect gamblers. Instead, the technology is to aid the casino in pinpointing its VIPs and making sure they're being catered to. Bloomberg journalist Jinshan Hong says Las Vegas Sands and MGM Resorts' Macau casinos have already installed such monitoring equipment.


Chinese casinos use AI, facial recognition to spot suckers

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Casinos in China's Macau territory have started to deploy high-tech surveillance tools to keep an eye on their customers. But they're not worried about security. Rather, the casinos use artificial intelligence and facial recognition to spot which customers are about to hand over the most money, according to The Los Angeles Times. In a bizarre real-world version of big data analytics, sophisticated algorithms can separate casual players to more heavy-duty gamblers, which the casino can then target with free perks to keep them playing. The AI system can track players who are more likely to make high-risk bets -- especially those who will continue to do so as they lose money -- as it monitors their activity in the casino.