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The Legend of Zelda games – ranked!

The Guardian

The 3DS's multiplayer Zelda game wasn't so much bad (unless you tried to play it by yourself, laboriously switching between all three characters) as eminently forgettable. Its weird, camp send-up of Hyrule and three-player puzzles have slipped almost entirely from my mind in the years since I played it, and what I do remember mostly involved shouting impotently at the screen as some online playmate entirely failed to see the solution to a puzzle that was staring them in the face. I maintain that hardly anyone has actually finished this needlessly opaque side-scrolling follow-up to 1986's The Legend of Zelda, because: a) it's incredibly hard to figure out what the game wants you to do; and b) the final dungeon has TWO bosses, and if you can't finish it then you're turfed out to attempt the whole thing again. Long considered the worst game in the Zelda series, it hasn't improved with age. The touch controls were cool, but what everyone remembers about Phantom Hourglass is being sent back to the same dungeon again and again every time you threatened to make some small amount of progress.


'Splatoon 3' and 'Skyward Sword' are coming to Nintendo Switch — here's where you can pre-order

Mashable

TL;DR: During the Feb. 18 Nintendo Direct, the company announced that Splatoon 3 and The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword HD are coming to Nintendo Switch -- they're both up for pre-order for $59.99. Splatoon 3 -- $59.99 at Best Buy The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword HD -- $59.99 at Best Buy Nintendo eShop Feb. 18 marked the first official Nintendo Direct since late 2019, and Nintendo had plenty of exciting things to show off (Mario Golf, anyone?). While a lot of new games were announced (and are now available to purchase), two games made waves following the big presentation: Splatoon 3 and The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword HD. Both are now up for pre-order, so if the announcements got you excited, you might as well secure your copies now. Exclusive'Skyward Sword' Joy-Con controllers are on the way, too.


'The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword HD' is coming to the Switch

Engadget

This year marks the 35th anniversary of The Legend of Zelda, and Nintendo naturally has a few things planned. There's no word on the Breath of the Wild sequel yet, but Nintendo is releasing The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword HD for the Switch on July 16th. As the title gives away, it's been remastered in HD, and Nintendo has totally revamped the control scheme, as well. The original game was designed for the Wii and relied extensively on motion controls that Nintendo recreated with the Switch's Joy-Con controllers. But for those using a Switch Lite (or people who just don't want to deal with the finicky nature of motion control), Nintendo remapped the controls to the Switch's standard control scheme.


The Legend of Zelda, 'Dinky,' and a Bridge to My Daughter

WIRED

When winter made its second pandemic appearance here in Montana, I found myself pining to relive my first experience with The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. To my dismay, the sequel, Hyrule Warriors: Age of Calamity, the bash-fest Nintendo released in November, didn't scratch my itch for sweeping, soothing landscapes and low-stakes puzzle solving during a year of high-stakes reality. I've been home with toddlers for 11 months straight, my every lockdown minute a battle against darkness and chaos, replete with my own two tiny red Bokoblins perpetually swinging their Boko Clubs at my weakened defenses. I wondered daily: Are there even enough stamella shrooms in the entire gaming universe to get us through this year? When we first hunkered down last spring, my kids were 18 months and 4 years old.


The greatest handheld games consoles – ranked!

The Guardian

OK, it's here more for the amazing backstory than the qualities of the handheld itself, but Gizmondo did momentarily look like a contender back in 2004, offering text messaging, web browsing and video playback as well as mobile gaming. But then the founders burned through millions of investor funds on Regent Street stores and extravagant launch parties, and the whole thing collapsed in spectacular fashion, symbolised by one exec's (non-fatal) 200mph Ferrari crash on the Pacific Coast Highway. Admittedly, there was not a huge amount of developer support for Dreamcast's amazingly idiosyncratic memory card/handheld console hybrid, but the fact that it even exists warrants it a place on the list. Despite its teeny 48 32 dot LCD screen, the VMU did support a range of mini games including a Chao pet sim in Sonic Adventure and Zombie Revenge's surreal Zombie Fishing. With a name that sounded like a character from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, the Tapwave Zodiac was another ambitious attempt to combine a games console with a mobile multimedia platform.


'Immortals: Fenyx Rising' is a worthy adventure wavering between cringe and charm

Washington Post - Technology News

It's not necessarily a criticism that this game's best ideas come from "Zelda." Nintendo's "Breath of the Wild" is all over Fenyx's adventure, from wing gliders (that can fly much faster and further), to power bracelets that can lift anything, all the way down to the "climb anywhere with a stamina bar" mechanic. But it's all done with enough distinction and bounce to distinguish itself not just from "Zelda," but from Mihoyo's breakaway 2020 online hit, "Genshin Impact." And while "Genshin" has frustrated players with gambling-based motivators to keep playing, "Fenyx" swoops in to fill the offline, single-player void for anyone hankering for a proper "Zelda"-like experience, especially since Nintendo has been radio silent about the next sequel.


All 55 NES Games on the Switch, Ranked

Slate

Sunday will mark 35 years since the Nintendo Entertainment System arrived on America's shores, saving a crashed video game industry and making a generation of gamers out of people who first learned to "play Nintendo" on the NES. For this 35-year-old, it's striking how Nintendo's breakout home game system, which my parents bought for my older brothers and which I literally grew up with, remains not only the bedrock of the company's corporate identity--witness the 8-bit Mario on your browser tab if you visit the Big N's website--but its creative wellspring too. Witness how Super Mario Bros. 35, Nintendo's new contender in the über-popular battle royal genre, is a thin remix of 1985's Super Mario Bros., an NES launch title. Or see the NES Classic, the recent bestselling miniversion of the console with 30 games packed in. While very few people may have the original gray-on-gray NES hooked up to their TV anymore, the titles designed for it will remain relevant for Nintendo fans of all ages as long as the company stays in the game.


Learn how to build a video game by recreating 'The Legend of Zelda'

Mashable

TL;DR: Create your own game with the Build The Legend of Zelda Clone in Unity3D and Blender course for $35, an 82% savings as of Sept. 30. If you're curious to know what makes Zelda a hit among gamers, you may want to consider finding out how it was created in the first place. The Build The Legend of Zelda Clone in Unity3D and Blender course will show what makes a game like Zelda tick, and give you an intro to game development and design to boot. You'll get a shot at recreating The Legend of Zelda -- a Nintendo classic. Taught by John Bura, a seasoned game programmer and educator, this course is designed to help you develop a game from scratch using Unity (a game engine) and Blender (an open-source 3D computer graphics software toolset).


Redditor spots 'Legend of Zelda' ingredients in historical novel, author owns it

Mashable

We've all done a quick Google search to check basic facts, but many of us forget to actually check what we've found. When you're a novelist, this speedy searching can be the difference between reality and fiction -- and that's exactly what happened to Irish novelist John Boyne, who accidentally included details for a dye recipe from an unlikely source: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. In the book, a character's dressmaking process is described, which includes some ingredients you might only find in one place, which is not accessible in the real world, where the novel is set. The dyes that I used in my dressmaking were composed from various ingredients, depending on the colour required, but almost all required nightshade, sapphire, keese wing, the leaves of the silent princess plant, Octorok eyeball, swift violet, thistle and hightail lizard. In addition, for the red I has used for Abrila's dress, I employed spicy pepper, the tail of the red lizalfos and four Hylian shrooms.


The 25 greatest video game consoles – ranked!

The Guardian

The second true 32-bit machine after the FM Towns Marty, the 3DO was available via a unique business model: the 3DO Company (formed by Electronic Arts founder Trip Hawkins) licensed its technical specifications to third-party manufacturers such as Sanyo and Panasonic, which then built their own versions. Unfortunately, this approach made the hardware hugely expensive ($699 at launch – equivalent to $1,267 or £990 today) compared with rival consoles that could be sold at a loss by their manufacturers. There were some excellent titles, including the original Need for Speed and the strategy-shooter Return Fire, but the PlayStation killed it stone dead. The veteran company's final console boasted a powerful yet jumbled architecture based around two silicon chipsets (named Tom and Jerry) and a Motorola 68000 processor. Some say it was difficult to code for, it lacked a broad games catalogue and at $249, it was also very expensive.