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What Is Neuromorphic Computing & How Is It Transforming AI Research

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Recently Intel Corp. delivered fifty million artificial neurons to Sandia National Laboratories, which is equivalent to the brain of a small mammal. The shipment is first in a three-year series, by the end of which they are expecting the number of experimental neurons in the final model to reach 1 billion or more. This collaboration aims to boost neuromorphic computing solutions to newer heights while prototyping the software, algorithms, and architectures. "With a neuromorphic computer of this scale, we have a new tool to understand how brain-based computers can do impressive feats that we cannot currently do with ordinary computers," said Craig Vineyard, project leader at Sandia. Researchers believe that improved algorithms and computer circuitry can create broader applications for neuromorphic computers.


Making better wine and beer with machine learning

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Fires during summer 2019–2020 decimated entire vineyards in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales, but smoke, which was far more widespread and insidious, seeped into grapes and into fermenting barrels, yielding unpleasant, unsaleable product. Although the full extent of the damage caused has not yet been calculated, analysis from the Australian Wine Research Institute indicates that smoke taint alone costs the country's wine industry tens to hundreds of millions of dollars each time a high fire season occurs. Advances in a wide range of technologies could help growers and winemakers mitigate the negative impact of smoke taint and other unpredictable anomalies, such as frost, drought, pests and disease -- and not just in Australia, but around the world. The Vineyard of the Future, led by Associate Professor Sigfredo Fuentes, a plant physiologist at the University of Melbourne, is an international consortium of scientists conducting leading-edge research to amass high-resolution data from vine to glass and analyse it in meaningful ways. Drones, satellite imaging, video analysis, and plant and people sensors combined with artificial intelligence -- collectively called "digital agriculture" -- give producers and sellers of wine an advantage in an industry riddled with uncertainty.


50 million artificial neurons to facilitate machine-learning research

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Fifty million artificial neurons--a number roughly equivalent to the brain of a small mammal--were delivered from Portland, Oregon-based Intel Corp. to Sandia National Laboratories last month, said Sandia project leader Craig Vineyard. The neurons will be assembled to advance a relatively new kind of computing, called neuromorphic, based on the principles of the human brain. Its artificial components pass information in a manner similar to the action of living neurons, electrically pulsing only when a synapse in a complex circuit has absorbed enough charge to produce an electrical spike. "With a neuromorphic computer of this scale," Vineyard said, "we have a new tool to understand how brain-based computers are able to do impressive feats that we cannot currently do with ordinary computers." Improved algorithms and computer circuitry can create wider applications for neuromorphic computers, said Vineyard. Sandia manager of cognitive and emerging computing John Wagner said, "This very large neural computer will let us test how brain-inspired processors use information at increasingly realistic scales as they come to actually approximate the processing power of brains.


Making Better Beer and Wine with Data and Machine Learning

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Bushfires in Australia are as commonplace as kangaroos and koalas. A hot, dry climate regularly sets the stage for conflagrations that endanger human lives, property, and wildlife and threaten one of the country's top economic industries: wine. Fires during summer 2019–2020 decimated entire vineyards in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales, but smoke, which was far more widespread and insidious, seeped into grapes and into fermenting barrels, yielding unpleasant, unsaleable product. Although the full extent of the damage caused has not yet been calculated, analysis from the Australian Wine Research Institute indicates that smoke taint alone costs the country's wine industry tens to hundreds of millions of dollars each time a high fire season occurs. Advances in a wide range of technologies could help growers and winemakers mitigate the negative impact of smoke taint and other unpredictable anomalies, such as frost, drought, pests, and disease -- and not just in Australia, but around the world.


Former CEO Of Artificial Intelligence Company Buys Historic Napa Valley Winery

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Back in 2016, Juan Pablo Torres-Padilla, who has been the CEO of an artificial intelligence (AI) company in France and has held other key positions in the telecommunications and financial investment world, decided to take the opportunity to buy the historic Napa Valley 26 acre Sullivan Rutherford Estate from the Sullivan family, the custodians of that piece of land for over 40 years. It would prove to be a good partnership in terms of handing over the estate to someone who not only wanted to bring this winery more to the forefront of the Napa fine wine world but that the history and legacy would be appreciated and built upon. The estate lies on land that has a deep and rich history which goes back almost two centuries to 1821 when Mexico took over ownership of Napa Valley from Spain. Mexico divided the Napa Valley into two parts: Rancho Carne Humana in the North and Rancho Caymus in the South. Sullivan Rutherford Estate director of winemaking, Jeff Cole, said that they are "essentially in the middle of the heart of Napa Valley vineyards" since the back of the border of their estate is along the Rancho Caymus line as it is right in the middle of where the property lines of Rancho Caymus and Rancho Carne Humana meet.


Autonomous farm robot Burro assists human workers with grape harvest

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It requires identifying specific use cases, as well as which fruit and vegetable growers to work with. When Burro.ai built a robot that uses autonomous driving to ferry produce between workers, it chose to initially focus on table grapes. By contrast, other agricultural AI startups like Ceres Imaging focused on high-value orchard crops like almonds and specialty crops like wine vineyards. Security drone maker Sunflower Labs is being used for automatic deployments on the perimeter of outdoor marijuana-growing operations. Last month, the company began delivering its first commercially available robots to grape growers near Coachella, California.


How Location Technology Has Transformed Agriculture Connected Farm

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Even as population growth slows, projections show that the world will be home to nearly 10 billion people by 2050, 2 billion more than it hosts today. The job of feeding them will fall to an industry that's emerging on the forefront of innovation. Article Snapshot: Long at the mercy of forces beyond their control, farmers are creating tech-reliant connected farms that track everything within inches and help them centrally manage every season in the fields. Farmers are getting younger and more tech savvy, and they're transforming the agriculture industry through location intelligence and tools such as AI, autonomous vehicles, and IoT-connected cattle. In this installment of the WhereNext Think Tank series, Esri's director of Professional Services, Brian Cross, interviews Esri's agriculture practice lead, Matt Harman.


How AI will Revolutionize the Future of Wine

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Within the next decade, Artificial Intelligence (AI) has the power to transform the wine industry forever. Right now, applications of AI for the wine industry are limited – but AI promises to be one of those immersive technologies that are embedded in everything we do, one way or another. According to a growing number of wine experts, AI could impact everything from how we buy wine, to how we grow vines in the vineyard, to how we judge wine. Think of how the Internet has revolutionized the wine industry in just the past two decades. It impacts how we learn about wine, how we order and buy wine online, and how we market wine to end consumers via social media platforms.


Artificial intelligence is transforming the way we farm

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Wine growers have a neat, if unusual, trick for making more flavorful wine--don't water the vines. Let the vines go dry right before harvest, and they will yield smaller grapes with more skin and less juice. Smaller grapes produce wine with a deeper color and more complex flavor. Trinchero Family Estates in Napa Valley, California wanted to make sure it was watering its grapes just the right amount, so they worked with Ceres Imaging to map their fields. Ceres used fixed-wing aircrafts to capture color, thermal, and infrared images of the vineyard, and they used artificial intelligence to analyze those images to see if the wine producer was overwatering its grapes.


How to retain your company's secrets for success by using big data, IoT, machine learning

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Recently, I crossed paths at an airport with a Midwestern brewmaster who shared that he was ready to retire, but simply couldn't. There was no one to take his place who could brew the company's trademark recipes for beer. This is not an uncommon business problem. Semiconductor companies report that their master materials engineers, who could work around a material shortage and still come up with an effective product, are retiring. It's creating a know-how gap that might leave the next materials shortage unsolved, since newer employees lack the know-how and experience.