video game


AI Technology in the Gaming Industry - Armchair Arcade

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AI technology has been making strides at a rapid pace with every passing day. AI isn't merely an idea anymore, some fanciful, futuristic thing that will always be out of reach, it is all around us, we use it every day. AI is used in the financial sector, cyber security, medicine, e-commerce, manufacturing, and of course, gaming. It is able to make medicine, protect your money, drive your car, or allows your fridge to tell you you're low on milk. Currently, AI is being heavily used in the gaming, medicine, and security fields.


Before Nintendo and Atari: How a black engineer changed the video game industry forever

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Each evokes memories of the golden age of video games, which brought the first wave of consoles you could connect to your home television. But there's an oft-forgotten person from that era whose contributions to the industry still resonate today: a black engineer named Jerry Lawson. Lawson oversaw the creation of the Channel F, the first video game console with interchangeable game cartridges – something the first Atari and Magnavox Odyssey systems did not use. Those initial consoles had a selection of games hardwired into the console itself. But Lawson, an engineer and designer at Fairchild Camera and Instrument Corp., led a team at the Silicon Valley semiconductor maker charged with creating a game system using Fairchild's F8 microprocessor and storing games on cartridges.


The Most Popular Computer Science Paper Of The Day

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been one of the most discussed topics in recent times and efforts are being put every day to make it more human. However, the future of AI is uncertain since it is hard to determine the direction AI is heading. CEO and Cofounder of Robust.AI, Gary Marcus an expert in AI has recently a published a new paper by the name'The Next Decade in AI: Four Steps Towards Robust Artificial Intelligence', which draws attention to a crucial fact about artificial intelligence, i.e., AI is not aware of its own operations and is only functioning as per certain commands within a controlled environment. The paper consists of 55 pages. It is an expansion of Marcus' argument against Yoshua Bengio during the 2019 AI debate.


Kazuhisa Hashimoto, creator of the 'Konami Code' for video games, has died

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Kazuhisa Hashimoto, the video game maker who created the most famous cheat code in video games – the "Konami Code" – has died. The series of button pushes on a controller – Up, Up, Down, Down, Left, Right, Left, Right, B, A – made its way into many video games over the years as a tribute to Hashimoto and a way for players to explore games and find Easter eggs. "Programmer Kazuhisa Hashimoto, the creator of the Konami command "Top, Bottom, Left, Right, Left, and Right BA", died last night. We pray for the souls," Takenouchi's translated tweet read. Konami's statement read, "We are saddened to hear about the passing of Kazuhisa Hashimoto, a deeply talented producer who first introduced the world to the'Konami Code.' Our thoughts are with Hashimoto-san's family and friends at this time. The "Konami Code" arose out of the Konami arcade game "Gradius," released in 1985 in Japan and a year later in the USA. Hashimoto, who programmed a version of the arcade game for the Nintendo Entertainment System, said the game was too tough for him to finish, so he inserted a special code to allow him to cheat when needed. "The arcade version of Gradius is really difficult, right?


Tesla driver who died in 'autopilot' crash was playing on phone, inquiry finds

The Guardian

A Tesla driver killed in a Silicon Valley crash was playing a video game on his smartphone at the time of his fatal crash, investigators said on Tuesday. The National Transport and Safety Board (NTSB) investigation found that Walter Huang, a 38-year-old Apple software engineer and game developer, made no attempts to stop his vehicle as it sped towards a crash barrier before the 2018 crash. Huang's Tesla Model X was in "Autopilot" mode and traveling at about 70 miles per hour when it crashed into a safety barrier and was struck by two other vehicles. He died in hospital from his injuries. "If you own a car with partial automation, do you not own a self-driving car. So don't pretend that you do," said the NTSB chairman, Robert Sumwalt.


Follow your Dreams: how the future of playing video games is making them

The Guardian

We're living in an age of mass, democratised creativity – or at least that's what the technology industry likes to tell us. You can shoot a movie or record an album on a smartphone, you can become a household name with a webcam and a YouTube channel, and you can download any of a dozen applications and build a video game from nothing. But the latter is an intimidating notion. Games are ultimately complex mechanisms, constructed from code, involving physics, narrative, animation and audio. There has been a deliberate effort within the industry to make creative tools more accessible, arguably spearheaded by Unity, a technology that both powers games and lets users create them – and yet, designing and constructing a game can feel overwhelming.


And relax … the joy of video games where you do almost nothing

The Guardian

In the recently released game Coffee Talk, you play a coffee-shop barista who stands at a counter, through long, rainy Seattle nights, making drinks for customers as they tell you about their lives. Your only interaction is pressing a button to move the conversation on and occasionally crafting a drink using the available ingredients. The beautiful pixel art interior of your shop, the fleeting glimpses of passersby outside, and the jazzy soundtrack replicate things we love about hanging out in real coffee places. Also, this is an alternative version of Seattle populated not just by humans, but by elves, demons and other fantastical beings, so your clientele is pretty varied. Elves tell you about their love lives, insomniac werewolves seek calm and quiet – you listen and you try to make drinks that will soothe them.


Kentucky banned 'Fortnite' from esports because of guns but swords and lasers are fine

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

LOUISVILLE – Even after Kentucky High School Athletic Association Commissioner Julian Tackett sent out an email notifying school officials that esports teams may not participate in the video game "Fortnite," there was nothing to be done among schools here. That's because "Fortnite," an online video game developed by Epic Games and released in 2017, was never included among the games played by Kentucky students in high school competitions. "Fortnite" is a third-person shooter game that doesn't include any blood, injuries or dead bodies, but nevertheless was given a Teen rating for violence by the Entertainment Software Rating Board. Epic Games and PlayVS, a software company that provides a platform for competitive esports, last week announced last Wednesday a partnership to introduce a competitive league for "Fortnite" across high schools and colleges. "There is no place for shooter games in our schools," Tackett said, adding that the KHSAA and the National Federation of State High School Associations had no knowledge that "Fortnite" was being added as part of the competition platform and are "strongly against it."


The Sims at 20: two decades of life, love and reorganising the kitchen

The Guardian

Like many girls of my generation, I first played The Sims at a sleepover. It was at my friend Hannah's house; three 11-year-olds huddled in front of her dad's bulky old computer monitor at midnight, gazing into a miniature house populated by tiny people going about their inexplicably compelling daily business. We took turns sending them to work, changing the wallpaper, and ordering them to put dirty dishes in the dishwasher instead of leaving them to gather flies. We bought them a little telly, a nice couch, a blender, paging covetously through the game's furniture catalogue. With a thrill, we discovered we could make Sims "smooch" (though we were disappointed to learn that they couldn't actually bone down – that wouldn't happen until The Sims 2).


Python For Network Engineers Bootcamp

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Link: Python For Network Engineers Bootcamp Get udemy course code Real-Life Hands-On Python Automation: Netmiko, Paramiko, Napalm, Nornir, GNS3,Telnet, SSH, Cisco, Arista, Linux etc Network Automation or Network Programming using Python and have the desire New What you'll learn You will MASTER all the Python 3 key concepts starting from Scratch. No prior Python or programming knowledge is required Learn network programmability with Python See real-world examples of automation scripts with Python for Cisco IOS, Arista EOS or Linux Learn how to use and improve Paramiko and Netmiko for automation of common administration tasks with Python Learn how to configure networking devices with Python You will learn in-depth general Python Programming Use NAPALM Python library in a Multivendor Environment Understand how to use Telnet and SSH with Python for network automation Learn how to automate the configuration of networking devices with Python 3 in a Multivendor Environment Description ***Fully updated for 2020*** This Network Automation with Python course also covers every major General Python Programming topic and is a perfect match for both beginners and experienced developers! Welcome to this Python hands-on course for learning Network Automation and Programmability with Python in a Cisco or Multivendor Environment. Boost your Python Network Programming Skills by learning one of the hottest topic in the Networking Industry in 2019 and become one of the best Network Engineer! This course is based on Python 3 and doesn't require prior Python Programming knowledge.