vehicle


Programme

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Driver assistance systems, such as lane keeping, adaptive cruise control, collision warning, and blind spot warning, have gradually moved from optional to standard features on most high-end vehicles. They are now making their way to all vehicle models. As automated systems assume more and more of the driver burden and take over increasing amounts of responsibility for the driving task, they require both more data and more processing power to augment the decisions that human drivers have made on their own. Sensors will take the place of human senses and artificial intelligence, it is thought, will substitute for human intelligence. This session will gather global experts on the subject to discuss their views on the progress and the prospects for vehicles that drive themselves.


The Rudest Drivers Tend To Drive These Car Brands, Which AI Self-Driving Cars Ought To 'Keep In Mind'

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Driver rudeness seems associated with certain brands, and AI self-driving cars ought to consider ... [ ] this. What kind of car do you drive? I don't mean whether it is a four-door or two-door, nor whether it is red in color or blue. Specifically, what brand of car do you drive? According to various studies (cited in a moment herein), supposedly the brand of car is a telltale indicator of how rude a driver sits behind the wheel of the vehicle.


Autonomous driving startup Pony.ai raises $462 million in Toyota-led funding

The Japan Times

HONG KONG/BEIJING – Autonomous driving firm Pony.ai said it raised $462 million in its latest funding round, led by an investment by Toyota Motor Corp. Toyota invested around $400 million (¥44.2 billion) in the round, Pony.ai said in a statement Wednesday, marking its biggest investment in an autonomous driving company with a Chinese background. The latest fund raising values the three-year-old firm, already backed by Sequoia Capital China and Beijing Kunlun Tech Co., at slightly more than $3 billion. The investment by Japan's largest automaker comes at a time when global carmakers, technology firms, start-ups and investors -- including Tesla, Alphabet Inc.'s Waymo and Uber -- are pouring capital into developing self-driving vehicles. Over the past two years, 323 deals related to autonomous cars raised a total of $14.6 billion worldwide, according to data provider PitchBook, even amid concerns about the technology given its high cost and complexity. The Silicon Valley-based startup Pony.ai -- co-founded by CEO James Peng, a former executive at China's Baidu, and chief technology officer Lou Tiancheng, a former Google and Baidu engineer -- is already testing autonomous vehicles in California, Beijing and Guangzhou.


To self-drive in the snow, look under the road

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Car companies have been feverishly working to improve the technologies behind self-driving cars. But so far even the most high-tech vehicles still fail when it comes to safely navigating in rain and snow. This is because these weather conditions wreak havoc on the most common approaches for sensing, which usually involve either lidar sensors or cameras. In the snow, for example, cameras can no longer recognize lane markings and traffic signs, while the lasers of lidar sensors malfunction when there's, say, stuff flying down from the sky. MIT researchers have recently been wondering whether an entirely different approach might work.


Everyone hates California's self-driving car reports

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Every year, companies that operate self-driving cars in California are required to submit data to the state's Department of Motor Vehicles listing the number of miles driven and the frequency at which human safety drivers were forced to take control of their autonomous vehicles (also known as a "disengagement"). And every year, those same companies raise a huge stink about it. Waymo, which drove 1.45 million miles in California in 2019 and logged a disengagement rate of 0.076 per 1,000 self-driven miles, says the metric "does not provide relevant insights" into its technology. Cruise, which drove 831,040 miles last year and reported a disengagement rate of 0.082, says the "idea that disengagements give a meaningful signal about whether an [autonomous vehicle] is ready for commercial deployment is a myth." Aurora, which only drove 13,429 miles and recorded a disengagement rate of 10.6 per 1,000 miles, calls them "misguided."


Autonomous vehicles get in the fast lane for next decade

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By 2030, a tenth of vehicles worldwide will be self-driving, and the market volume of fully automated cars getting into gear by this time is expected to be worth $13.7bn, according to the latest DossierPlus report from Statista. The analyst's study said that after billions of miles of tests in simulations or on public roads, self-driving cars are beginning to leave the test tracks. Autonomous driving has come a long way since Waymo (previously named the Google Self-Driving Car Project) started testing self-driving cars. The report noted that digital taxi firm Uber has invested more than $1bn over three years on self-driving cars. Statista also observed that when General Motors subsidiary Cruise received US$3.4bn in funding in 2018, the overall automotive startup funding had increased ten-fold over the past five years, reaching a record-breaking $US 27.5bn in 2018.


SEAT is experimenting with technology that studies a driver to detect if they're falling asleep

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Spanish car manufacturer Seat is working on technology to track a driver's eyes and spot signs of drowsiness. The firm has partnered with an Israeli firm that has built an algorithm than scrutinises a driver's eye openness, angle of vision, blink rate and head position. Eyesight Technologies uses cameras and sensors and combines this with artificial intelligence to spot early warning signs the driver may be falling asleep. Spanish car manufacturer Seat is working on technology to track a driver's eyes and spot signs of drowsiness. The firm has partnered with an Israeli firm that has built an algorithm than scrutinises a driver's eye openness, angle of vision, blink rate and head position The Tel Aviv-based company says an alert is sounded if the system detects the driver is asleep.


Autonomous driving startup Pony.ai raises $462 million in Toyota-led funding

The Japan Times

HONG KONG/BEIJING – Autonomous driving firm Pony.ai said on Wednesday it has raised $462 million in its latest funding round, led by an investment by Japan's largest automaker Toyota Motor Corp. Toyota invested around $400 million (¥44.2 billion) in the round, Pony.ai said in a statement, marking its biggest investment in an autonomous driving company with a Chinese background. The latest fund raising values the three-year-old firm, already backed by Sequoia Capital China and Beijing Kunlun Tech Co, at slightly more than $3 billion. The investment by Toyota comes at a time when global car makers, technology firms, start-ups and investors -- including Tesla, Alphabet Inc's Waymo and Uber -- are pouring capital into developing self-driving vehicles. Over the past two years, 323 deals related to autonomous cars raised a total of $14.6 billion worldwide, according to data provider PitchBook, even amid concerns about the technology given its high cost and complexity. The Silicon Valley-based startup Pony.ai -- co-founded by CEO James Peng, a former executive at China's Baidu, and chief technology officer Lou Tiancheng, a former Google and Baidu engineer -- is already testing autonomous vehicles in California, Beijing and Guangzhou.


SwRI's Motion Prediction Algorithms Enhance Safety Features for Automated Vehicles

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Southwest Research Institute, a leading innovator of machine learning technologies, has developed a motion prediction system that enhances pedestrian detection for automated vehicles. The computer vision tool uses a novel deep learning algorithm to predict motion by observing real-time biomechanical movements with the pelvic area being a key indicator for changes. "For instance, if a pedestrian is walking west, the system can predict if that person will suddenly turn south," said SwRI's Samuel E. Slocum, a senior research analyst who led the internally funded project. "As the push for automated vehicles accelerates, this research offers several important safety features to help protect pedestrians." Recent accidents involving automated vehicles have heightened the call for improved detection of pedestrians and other moving obstacles.


NTSB chair eviscerates Tesla for inaction over Autopilot concerns

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The National Transportation Safety Board held a hearing on Tuesday regarding a deadly 2018 crash in which a Tesla Model X slammed into a Mountain View highway divider at 70mph, was subsequently struck by two other vehicles and then exploded. During that announcement, the safety board revealed that the driver, Apple developer Walter Huang, was playing a mobile game on his phone at the time of the accident, while the vehicle's Autopilot feature was engaged. "Government regulators have provided scant oversight" over the semi-autonomous driving systems that are quickly becoming standard features on modern automobiles, NTSB chair Robert Sumwalt declared. While the NTSB does not have the authority to enforce safety measures, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration can issue recalls for unsafe vehicle tech. The NTSB also determined via cellphone records and device data that Huang's phone was running a mobile game at the time of the crash.