IBM unveils world's smallest computer

The Independent

IBM has unveiled the world's smallest computer - a device no bigger that a grain of salt. Presented at the company's Think 2018 conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, the unit measures just 1mm by 1mm but has the same processing power as the x86 chip that ran early Nineties IBM desktop computers. The microscopic "crypto-anchor" CPU is essentially an anti-fraud device, designed to be embedded within price tags and product packaging like barcodes, tracking and logging the movement of goods during shipping. "The world's smallest computer is an IBM-designed edge device architecture and computing platform that is smaller than a grain of salt will cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and can monitor, analyse, communicate and even act on data," the company said. "It packs several hundred thousand transistors into a footprint barely visible to the human eye and can help verify that a product has been handled properly throughout its long journey."

Operator of self-driving Uber vehicle that killed pedestrian was felon


Tempe police speak at a press conference to address the accident where a self-driving Uber killed a pedestrian. In this file photo taken in 2016, pilot models of the Uber self-driving car are displayed at the Uber Advanced Technologies Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. PHOENIX -- The operator behind the wheel of a self-driving Uber vehicle that hit and killed a 49-year-old woman Sunday night had served almost four years in an Arizona prison in the early 2000s on an attempted armed robbery conviction. A representative for Uber declined to comment on the conviction and the company's hiring policies, citing an active investigation. Elaine Herzberg was walking a bike across a street outside a crosswalk in Tempe, Ariz., at about 10 p.m. when she was hit, police said.

How Driverless Cars See the World Around Them


On Sunday night, a woman died after she was hit by a self-driving car operated by Uber in Tempe, Ariz. The car was operating autonomously, though a safety driver was behind the wheel, according to a statement from the local police. Uber is one of many companies now testing this kind of vehicle in Arizona, California and other parts of the country. Waymo, the self-driving car company owned by Google's parent company, Alphabet, has said it is also operating autonomous cars on the outskirts of Phoenix without a safety driver behind the wheel. On Monday, Uber said it was halting tests in Tempe, Pittsburgh, Toronto and San Francisco.

Are you talking to me? Voice technology and AI at CES 2018


There's no question as to who the real technology star is now: it's you. Your voice is what hundreds of companies are vying to attract, with thousands of new products calling out for you to talk to them. Voice-activated technology has erupted over the last 12 months since Amazon's Alexa was informally crowned breakout technology champion of the CES 2017 consumer tech show. Seemingly by stealth, Amazon had snuck Alexa into a dizzying array of products and everywhere you turned, there she was. Alexa was the name on everyone's lips – literally – and Amazon had achieved this near-ubiquitous name- recognition without even having a stand at the gargantuan annual gadget-fest in Las Vegas.

Arizona Governor Helped Make State 'Wild West' For Driverless Cars


An Uber driverless car heads out for a test drive in San Francisco in December 2016, the same month that the company halted testing there and moved it to Arizona. An Uber driverless car heads out for a test drive in San Francisco in December 2016, the same month that the company halted testing there and moved it to Arizona. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey began a push three years ago to attract makers of self-driving cars to the state and actively wooed Uber away from California as a venue for testing those vehicles. Shortly after his election in 2015, the governor signed an executive order supporting the testing and operation of self-driving vehicles that he said was about "innovation, economic growth, and most importantly, public safety." Now the "public safety" part of that order has been thrown into question and Arizona's willingness to become a testing ground for emerging driverless vehicles has come into sharp focus after Sunday's incident in which a self-driving Volvo SUV operated by Uber struck and killed a 49-year-old woman who was walking her bicycle in Tempe.

Gatwick Airport to trial British self-driving car system from Oxbotica


Gatwick claims it will be the first airport to operate self-driving cars "airside", using a system from Oxford University spin-off Oxbotica. The vehicles will move staff around the airport, but at this stage, they will not be used by airline passengers. If the six-month trial is successful, the airport says it may use autonomous vehicles for other purposes, such as "aircraft push back tugs, passenger load bridges, baggage tugs and transportation buses". There are about 40 potential airport applications. Gatwick says it has 300 airside vehicles and that they are stationary 90 percent of the time.

Uber Suspends Driverless-Car Program After Pedestrian Death WSJD - Technology

In response, Uber on Monday temporarily pulled its self-driving cars off the roads where it has been testing them in four cities. An Uber spokeswoman said the company is investigating the incident and cooperating with authorities. Police in Tempe, Ariz., said the Uber vehicle was in autonomous mode with a human safety operator at the wheel when it hit 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg on Sunday night while she was walking her bicycle outside of a crosswalk. The woman later died from her injuries, according to a police statement. While it isn't clear yet whether Uber's vehicle was at fault in the accident, the fatality confirmed the fears of those who have warned for several years that someone would eventually die from driverless cars.

Uber's transparency is key to making self-driving cars safer


As a result of this incident, Uber has stopped all self-driving vehicle tests in San Francisco, Pittsburgh, Toronto and the greater Phoenix area. "Our hearts go out to the victim's family. We are fully cooperating with local authorities in their investigation of this incident," said Uber in a statement. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi echoed the sentiment on Twitter, saying that the authorities were trying to figure out what happened. We're thinking of the victim's family as we work with local law enforcement to understand what happened.

Uber Halts Autonomous Car Tests After Fatal Crash in Arizona


Uber Technologies Inc. halted autonomous vehicle tests after one of its cars struck and killed a woman in Tempe, Arizona, in what is likely the first pedestrian fatality involving the technology. The 49-year-old woman, Elaine Herzberg, was crossing the road outside of a crosswalk when the Uber vehicle operating in autonomous mode under the supervision of a human safety driver struck her, according to the Tempe Police Department. After the incident, which happened at 10 p.m. local time on Sunday, she was transferred to a nearby hospital, where she died from her injuries. "Uber is assisting and this is still an active investigation," Liliana Duran, a Tempe police spokeswoman, said in an emailed statement. We're thinking of the victim's family as we work with local law enforcement to understand what happened.

Robot rides are going to deliver pizza and parcels before people


In the wait for self-driving technology, cell-phone toting tech bros may have to cede their spot in line to pizzas, Craigslist couches and the mounting ephemera of e-commerce. The future-at least in the near-term-will not only be driverless, but sans passenger as well. The early conversations around driverless cars have focused on robot taxis because taking the human driver out of a cab seemed like the quickest path to profitability. "The revolution in commercial vehicles will come first, then the passenger cars" will follow, said Ashwani Gupta, senior vice president of Renault-Nissan's light commercial vehicle business. "The moment business people start believing this is going to generate additional revenue and that this is going to be more efficient, then I think they'll start working on it."