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How is Neuromorphic Computing Changing the Face of Artificial Intelligence (AI)

#artificialintelligence

As we know that these days AI has been a very demanding topic these days. All the industries are using AI also it will change the phase soon. The most successful and widespread technique is the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs). ANNs emulate the way that neurons function in biological systems such as the human brain, creating a network of interconnected artificial neurons. They have proven to be very effective at several tasks, especially those involving pattern recognition, such as computer vision, speech recognition or medical diagnosis from symptoms or scans.


Tesla employees say they took shortcuts to meet aggressive Model 3 production goals

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Tesla has reigned over the electric car market for over a decade, but these new autos are hoping to give Tesla a run for their money. Current and former Tesla employees working in the company's open-air "tent" factory say they were pressured to take shortcuts to hit aggressive Model 3 production goals, including making fast fixes to plastic housings with electrical tape, working through harsh conditions and skipping previously required vehicle tests. For instance, four people who worked on the assembly line say they were told by supervisors to use electrical tape to patch cracks on plastic brackets and housings, and provided photographs showing where tape was applied. They and four additional people familiar with conditions there describe working through high heat, cold temperatures at night and smoky air during last year's wildfires in Northern California. Tesla can't appeal to women: Electric cars, Elon Musk may be off-putting Why I bought a Tesla: One woman's experience buying Elon Musk's sleek EV Their disclosures highlight the difficult balance Tesla must strike as it ramps up production while trying to stem costs. Tesla recently told shareholders that in the three months ending June 30, 2019, it made 87,048 vehicles, including 72,531 Model 3s, the company's lowest-priced sedan.


A mind of its own: Russia unveils terrifying new AI 'superweapon'

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The race to incorporate artificial intelligence in modern weapons threatens to outstrip the technology's capabilities -- and the world's ability to control them. The Commander-in-Chief of Russia's air force, Viktor Bondarev, has told a gathering at the MAKS-2017 international airshow his aircraft would soon be getting cruise missiles with artificial intelligence capable of analysing their environment and opponents and make "decisions" about altitude, speed, course -- and targets. "Work in this area is under way," Russian news agency TASS reports Tactical Missiles Corporation CEO Boris Obnosov as adding. "As of today, certain successes are available, but we'll still have to work for several years to achieve specific results." While neither indicated which missiles were slated to get such enhanced artificial intelligence, there are two apparent contenders among the "super weapons" President Vladimir Putin bragged about last year: the "Avangard" hypersonic glide vehicle and the "Burevestnik" nuclear-powered cruise missile.


The Threat of Artificial Intelligence Weapons - Daily Times

#artificialintelligence

All major powers are currently focusing on the development of autonomous weapon systems. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a technological breakthrough that would render the world unrecognisable as we know it today. Though the idea that machines would possess human-like cognitive capabilities might have sounded like science fiction in the past century, it has now transitioned to reality. Since its inception, Artificial Intelligence has drawn attention from a diverse number of fields and the concerned "researches and developments" are moving at a staggering pace. AI-powered smart assistants to advanced training simulations and even self-driving vehicles are a reality now.


7 digital privacy tricks you'll wish you knew before now

FOX News

Coalition of privacy groups asks the feds to investigate Amazon for possible violations on Echo Dot Kids Edition; FBN's Jackie DeAngelis reports. We surround ourselves with devices. Our cars respond to us. Our smart TVs listen to us. Every camera in every tablet and laptop is a potential spying device.


Russia's terrifying new 'superweapon' revealed

#artificialintelligence

The Commander-in-Chief of Russia's air force Viktor Bondarev has told a gathering at the MAKS-2017 international airshow his aircraft would soon be getting cruise missiles with artificial intelligence capable of analysing its environment and opponents and make "decisions" about altitude, speed, course -- and targets. "Work in this area is underway," Russian news agency TASS reports Tactical Missiles Corporation CEO Boris Obnosov as adding. "As of today, certain successes are available, but we'll still have to work for several years to achieve specific results." While neither indicated which missiles were slated to get such enhanced artificial intelligence, there are two apparent contenders among the "super weapons" President Vladimir Putin bragged about last year: the "Avangard" hypersonic glide vehicle and the "Burevestnik" nuclear-powered cruise missile. RELATED: Why the world's most holy place sends people crazy RELATED: Earth's magnetic pole is on the move and we don't know why Much modern weaponry is already capable of making choices -- such as the automated Gatling guns designed to react and shoot-down incoming missiles in the blink of an eye.


Gaps Emerge In Automotive Test

#artificialintelligence

Demands by automakers for zero defects over 18 years are colliding with real-world limitations of testing complex circuitry and interactions, and they are exposing a fundamental disconnect between mechanical and electronic expectations that could be very expensive to fix. This is especially apparent at leading-edge nodes, where much of the logic is being developed for AI systems and image sensing. While existing equipment for wafer, die and package inspection works well enough for most applications all the way down to 7nm, automakers' demands that chips remain functional for 18 years under harsh road conditions is a time-consuming process. So while 99% sampling may be good enough for a smart phone, it is not good enough for safety-critical functions. To make matters worse, automotive testing often requires synchronization between different components, both within and outside of a vehicle, and much more insight into where potential problems can arise. This is no longer just about using an automated test equipment (ATE) machine in a flow to sample a certain percentage of dies and wafers.


Do Driverless Cars Really Need Edge Computing?

#artificialintelligence

Along with virtual and augmented reality and the Internet of Things, self-driving cars have been one of tech experts' go-to applications when explaining the utility of edge computing. Until not too long ago, Dean Nelson, who just left his job as head of computing infrastructure at Uber, also assumed autonomous vehicles, which can generate tens of terabytes of data per day, would shuffle much of that data to and from servers in their vicinity, relying on the processing power at the edge (and ultra-fast wireless networks) to augment their onboard computing muscle. But, after spending a few years up close and personal with the technology infrastructure that powers one of the front-running companies in the race to make driverless cars viable, he's no longer sure edge computing will play a big role. "In the last couple years I changed my mind with autonomous vehicles," Nelson said Thursday while sitting on a panel at DCD San Francisco, a data center industry conference. Earlier that day, he had announced in post on LinkedIn that he was leaving Uber to start his own consultancy and devote more time to family and the activities of Infrastructure Masons, the industry group for data center professionals he founded in 2016.


Self-driving cars are further away than you think

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The promise of autonomous cars has no doubt been an exciting and intoxicating one for technophiles everywhere, not to mention those who see driving as a chore that must be endured, rather than enjoyed. There's no shortage of autonomy evangelists - Tesla CEO Elon Musk is a famous example, Ford reckons it will have its first truly self-driving car ready by 2021 and BMW and Mercedes have similar timelines - while ridesharing companies and Silicon Valley tech giants like Uber and Google are also bullish on fully-autonomous vehicles. And why wouldn't they be? Without a driver taking a cut of fares, profit margins for those businesses would explode, while also giving the public cheaper rides and potentially freeing them from the financial burden of owning a car. But according to one of the world's biggest manufacturers of the advanced sensors that make autonomous cars possible, the utopian vision of completely hands-off, point-to-point driving is highly unlikely for the foreseeable.


VW and Ford extend collaboration to electric, self-driving cars

The Japan Times

FRANKFURT - Volkswagen AG and Ford Motor Co. will cooperate on electric and self-driving car technology, sharing costs on a global scale to take a major step forward in the industry's disruptive transformation. VW will invest $2.6 billion in Ford's autonomous-car partner Argo AI in a deal that values the operation at more than $7 billion, the two manufacturers said Friday in a joint statement in New York, confirming a figure first reported by Bloomberg. This includes $1 billion in funding and VW contributing its Audi $1.6 billion Autonomous Intelligent Driving unit. "While Ford and Volkswagen remain independent and fiercely competitive in the marketplace, teaming up and working with Argo AI on this important technology allows us to deliver unmatched capability, scale and geographic reach," Ford Chief Executive Officer Jim Hackett said. Ford shares climbed as much as 2.1 percent as of 9:40 a.m.