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Facebook funds AI ethics center in Munich DW 20.01.2019

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Facebook announced on Sunday that it will help create an independent ethics research center for artificial intelligence (AI) with the Technical University of Munich (TUM). The technology giant said it will provide $7.5 million over five years as "an initial funding grant." With the AI industry growing at unprecedented levels, its use and impact have come under increased scrutiny, with some experts warning of the potential for unexpected consequences from its application. Technology companies, including Facebook and Google, have come under significant pressure from governments and research institutes to do more to protect people affected by AI applications. "From Facebook potentially inciting ethnic cleansing in Myanmar, to Cambridge Analytica seeking to manipulate elections, to Google building a secret censored search engine for the Chinese, to anger over Microsoft contracts with (US Immigration and Customs Enforcement) to multiple worker uprisings over conditions in Amazon's algorithmically managed warehouses -- the headlines haven't stopped," said New York-based research institute AI Now last month.


How Governments Are Adopting Blockchain and AI In Advanced Economies

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Governments in advanced countries are adopting Blockchain technology and artificial intelligence at a rapid pace. From Estonia, to Malta, The Netherlands to the United States, all countries busy themselves to become fully digitalized societies, hopefully before the expiration of the current decade. As I have written on a previous article, blockchain, AI and the Internet of Things are evolving at an unimaginable speed, particularly in advanced economies. Thus governments necessarily need to look at blockchain technology as being the best tech to cope with an increasingly interconnected and complex world. The reason why blockchain can be so useful pertains to its characteristics in terms of enhanced trust and because they are designed at their core to be transparent.


Do You Have Early Signs Of Cervical Cancer? How AI Technology May Help

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What role will AI play in cervical cancer screening? Will artificial intelligence, otherwise known as AI, soon be at your cervix to help prevent and detect cancer? A study recently published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute showed how AI could serve as an extra eye to help doctors find pre-cancerous and cancerous lesions in the part of your body that connects your vagina with your uterus. As I've written previously for Forbes, each year cervical cancer kills around 265,000 women worldwide, but a majority of deaths could be quite preventable. Besides getting the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine, the key to preventing cervical cancer is getting regular pelvic exams so that concerning lesions can be caught early.


TSA Says the Number of Agents Skipping Work Has Spiked Due to the Shutdown

Mother Jones

Transportation Security Administration agents help passengers through a security checkpoint at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark. New figures released Sunday reveal a record number of agents are not showing up to work. The Transportation Security Administration has reported that the number of airport security agents not showing up to work reached an all-time high over the holiday weekend, according to the Washington Post, a side-effect of the government shutdown that the Department of Homeland Security previously stated was non a concern. TSA agents are among the estimated 800,000 federal workers who are furloughed or working without pay during a government shutdown that is reaching its 30th day. The Washington Post reported that the number of unscheduled absences hit 8 percent nationally this weekend, up from a 3 percent a year ago.


Analysis The Technology 202: Venture capitalists balk at proposed export limits on AI, quantum computing

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A live demonstration uses artificial intelligence and facial recognition in dense crowd spatial-temporal technology at the Horizon Robotics exhibit at the Las Vegas Convention Center during CES 2019 in Las Vegas on January 10, 2019. Venture capitalists are warning the Trump administration not to overly restrict the export of new technology such as artificial intelligence -- insisting that could make it much harder for American start-ups to sell their products abroad. The Commerce Department is considering whether to slap tighter export controls on a long list of new technologies, including AI and quantum computers, to prevent U.S. technology from falling into the hands of foreign adversaries. But the National Venture Capital Association, in public comments on the potential rule last week, voiced concerns that the list of technology the government defines as critical to national security is far too broad. The venture capitalists only want to see the department limit the export of technology specific to defense -- not a whole category of technology so broad it could include consumer products such as self-driving cars and voice assistants.


Do You Have Early Signs Of Cervical Cancer? How AI Technology May Help

#artificialintelligence

What role will AI play in cervical cancer screening? Will artificial intelligence, otherwise known as AI, soon be at your cervix to help prevent and detect cancer? A study recently published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute showed how AI could serve as an extra eye to help doctors find pre-cancerous and cancerous lesions in the part of your body that connects your vagina with your uterus. As I've written previously for Forbes, each year cervical cancer kills around 265,000 women worldwide,but a majority of deaths could be quite preventable. Besides getting the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine, the key to preventing cervical cancer is getting regular pelvic exams so that concerning lesions can be caught early.


Can we trust tech giants with our faces? Google, Amazon and Microsoft can't agree on how to protect us

USATODAY

A top Google executive recently sent a shot across the bow of its competitors regarding face surveillance. Kent Walker, the company's general counsel and senior vice president of global affairs, made it clear that Google -- unlike Amazon and Microsoft -- will not sell a face recognition product until the technology's potential for abuse is addressed. Face recognition, powered by artificial intelligence, could allow the government to supercharge surveillance by automating identification and tracking. Authorities could use it to track protesters, target vulnerable communities (such as immigrants), and create digital policing in communities of color that are already subject to pervasive police monitoring. So how are the world's biggest technology companies responding to this serious threat to privacy, safety and civil rights?


Driverless shuttle to make Utah debut at state Capitol

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A driverless public shuttle is expected to make its Utah debut this year as state officials test the possibilities of autonomous vehicles. The Salt Lake Tribune reports the shuttle that holds about a dozen people is expected to begin operating in February at the state Capitol. It will initially travel sidewalks since autonomous cars aren't street legal. A state lawmaker is hoping to change that. Republican Rep. Robert Spendlove is proposing a bill that would allow autonomous vehicles on state roads and resolve other legal problems.


AI approach outperformed human experts in identifying cervical precancer

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A research team led by investigators from the National Institutes of Health and Global Good has developed a computer algorithm that can analyze digital images of a woman's cervix and accurately identify precancerous changes that require medical attention. This artificial intelligence (AI) approach, called automated visual evaluation, has the potential to revolutionize cervical cancer screening, particularly in low-resource settings. To develop the method, researchers used comprehensive datasets to "train" a deep, or machine, learning algorithm to recognize patterns in complex visual inputs, such as medical images. The approach was created collaboratively by investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and Global Good, a fund at Intellectual Ventures, and the findings were confirmed independently by experts at the National Library of Medicine (NLM). The results appeared in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute on January 10, 2019.


New AI Technique Detects Cervical Pre-cancer - eHealth News ZA

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Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and Global Good have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) based computer algorithm that can identify cervical pre-cancer with greater accuracy than a human expert. The algorithm, called automated visual evaluation, can analyse digital images of a cervix and accurately identify precancerous changes that require medical attention, an advance the researchers say could revolutionise screening, particularly in low-resource settings. The new method can be performed with minimal training, making it ideal for countries with limited healthcare resources, where cervical cancer is a leading cause of illness and death among women. According to the researchers, automated visual evaluation is easy to perform. Health workers can use a cell phone or similar camera device for cervical screening and treatment during a single visit.