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B-52s again fly over Mideast in US military warning to Iran

Boston Herald

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) -- A pair of B-52 bombers flew over the Mideast on Sunday, the latest such mission in the region aimed at warning Iran amid tensions between Washington and Tehran. The flight by the two heavy bombers came as a pro-Iran satellite channel based in Beirut broadcast Iranian military drone footage of an Israeli ship hit by a mysterious explosion only days earlier in the Mideast. While the channel sought to say Iran wasn't involved, Israel has blamed Tehran for what it described as an attack on the vessel. The U.S. military's Central Command said the two B-52s flew over the region accompanied by military aircraft from nations including Israel, Saudi Arabia and Qatar. It marked the fourth-such bomber deployment into the Mideast this year and the second under President Joe Biden.


Latest 2021 Stanford AI Study Gives Deep Look into the State of the Global AI Marketplace

#artificialintelligence

Despite major disruptions from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, global investment in AI technologies grew by 40 percent in 2020 to $67.9 billion, up from $48.8 billion in 2019, as AI research and use continues to boom across broad segments of bioscience, healthcare, manufacturing and more. The figures, compiled as part of Stanford University's Artificlal Intelligence Index Report 2021 on the state of AI research, development, implementation and use around the world, help illustrate the continually changing scope of the still-maturing technology. The 222-page AI Index 2021 report, touted as the school's fourth annual study of AI impact and progress, was released March 3 by Stanford's Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. The report provides a detailed portrait of the AI waterfront last year, including increasing AI investments and use in medicine and healthcare, China's growth in AI research, huge gains in AI capabilities across industries, concerns about diversity among AI researchers, ongoing debates about AI ethics and more. "The impact of AI this past year was both societal and economic, driven by the increasingly rapid progress of the technology itself," AI Index co-chair Jack Clark said in a statement.


AI reveals current drugs that may help combat Alzheimer's

#artificialintelligence

New York, March 7 (IANS) Researchers have developed a method based on Artificial Intelligence (AI) that rapidly identifies currently available medications that may treat Alzheimer's disease. The method could represent a rapid and inexpensive way to repurpose existing therapies into new treatments for this progressive, debilitating neurodegenerative condition. Importantly, it could also help reveal new, unexplored targets for therapy by pointing to mechanisms of drug action. "Repurposing FDA-approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease is an attractive idea that can help accelerate the arrival of effective treatment -- but unfortunately, even for previously approved drugs, clinical trials require substantial resources, making it impossible to evaluate every drug in patients with Alzheimer's disease," said researcher Artem Sokolov from Harvard Medical School. "We therefore built a framework for prioritising drugs, helping clinical studies to focus on the most promising ones," Sokolov added.


What Policies Should India Emulate From The US's AI Playbook?

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The National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI) recently published the Final Report for 2021 outlining an integrated national strategy to empower the US in the era of AI-accelerated competition and conflict. NSCAI worked with technologists, national security professionals, business executives and academic leaders to put out the report. According to the report, the US government is a long way from being "AI-ready." Based on the findings, the commission has proposed a set of policy recommendations. The US leads in almost all AI parameters than most countries, including India.


FDA authorizes new test to detect past Covid-19 infections

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The Food and Drug Administration on Friday issued an emergency authorization for a new test to detect Covid-19 infections -- one that stands apart from the hundreds already authorized. Unlike tests that detect bits of SARS-CoV-2 or antibodies to it, the new test, called T-Detect COVID, looks for signals of past infections in the body's adaptive immune system -- in particular, the T cells that help the body remember what its viral enemies look like. Developed by Seattle-based Adaptive Biotechnologies, it is the first test of its kind. Adaptive's approach involves mapping antigens to their matching receptors on the surface of T cells. They and other researchers had already shown that the cast of T cells floating around in an individual's blood reflects the diseases they've encountered, in many cases years later.


AI Tool Animates Old Photos, Takes Social Media By Storm - Zenger News

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When Krish Ashok, a technologist and food science enthusiast based out of Chennai, shared pictures of his father and great-grandmother, animated through a new artificial intelligence (AI) tool with the senior members in his family, they were deeply moved. "They were shaken by what they saw," Ashok told Zenger News. Deep Nostalgia, which animates old photos, is the latest AI tool that has taken the Internet by storm. But, it has also sparked a conversation about the ethical implications of such tools -- and not everyone is comfortable with it. The video reenactment technology's web-based version was overrun by eager users within a week of its launch on Feb. 25, and the site had to undergo maintenance to keep up.



Fear itself is the real threat to democracy, not tall tales of Chinese AI John Naughton

The Guardian

This week the American National Security Commission on artificial intelligence released its final report. Cursory inspection of its 756 pages suggests that it's just another standard product of the military-industrial complex that so worried President Eisenhower at the end of his term of office. On closer examination, however, it turns out to be a set of case notes on a tragic case of what we psychologists call "hegemonic anxiety" – the fear of losing global dominance. The report is the work of 15 bigwigs, led by Dr Eric Schmidt, the former CEO of Alphabet (and before that the adult supervisor imposed by venture capitalists on the young co-founders of Google). Of the 15 members of the commission only four are female.


The World Needs Democratic AI Principles

#artificialintelligence

To maintain its edge and support the adoption of a democratic AI environment, the U.S. government must redouble investment in AI innovations in the United States and allied nations that solve public problems and improve defenses against illiberal AI technologies. In the mid-20th century, the United States funded over two-thirds of global research and development. Today it funds less than one-third. To reverse this trend, the U.S. government must not replicate the Chinese top-down investment strategy that disincentives innovation and incentivizes corruption. Instead, it should fund research and development centers at universities and expand public-private partnerships and existing government to commercial-use technology transfer programs, both at home and abroad.


AI-based method used to screen for Alzheimer's disease drugs

#artificialintelligence

Researchers have used artificial intelligence to screen 80 FDA-approved drugs and reveal which could be used as Alzheimer's treatments. A team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Medical School (HMS), both US, has developed an artificial intelligence (AI)-based method to screen currently available medications as possible treatments for Alzheimer's disease. According to the researchers, the method could represent a rapid and inexpensive way to repurpose existing therapies into new treatments for the neurodegenerative condition. It could also help reveal new, unexplored targets for therapy by pointing to mechanisms of drug action. "Repurposing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease is an attractive idea that can help accelerate the arrival of effective treatment – but unfortunately, even for previously approved drugs, clinical trials require substantial resources, making it impossible to evaluate every drug in patients with Alzheimer's disease," explained Dr Artem Sokolov, at HMS. "We therefore built a framework for prioritising drugs, helping clinical studies to focus on the most promising ones."