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C-level executives should be responsible AI ethics in organizations

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AI ethics has always been a topic of concern for most organizations hoping to leverage the technology in some use cases. While AI has improved over the years, the reality is that AI has become integral to products and services, with some organizations now looking to develop AI codes of ethics. While the whole notion of AI ethics is still debatable in many ways, the use of AI can not be held back, especially with the world becoming increasingly influenced by modern technologies. Last year, UNESCO member states adopted the first-ever global agreement on the Ethics of AI. The guidelines define the common values and principles to guide the construction of necessary legal infrastructure to ensure the healthy development of AI. "Emerging technologies such as AI have proven their immense capacity to deliver for good. However, its negative impacts that are exacerbating an already divided and unequal world, should be controlled. AI developments should abide by the rule of law, avoiding harm, and ensuring that when harm happens, accountability and redressal mechanisms are at hand for those affected," stated UNESCO.


What are ethics in artificial intelligence? - Blog post

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Artificial intelligence is probably the greatest transformative technology of our generation. Experts predict that the value of the AI market will reach over $266 billion by 2027, representing an 880% increase compared to 2019. As exciting as AI innovation might be from a practical viewpoint, there are also some issues to consider when it comes to ethics in AI. AI is a technology that aims to enhance and unlock human potential. It is here to augment or replicate problem-solving and decision-making capabilities that require a certain level of "human intelligence".


Gender bias in AI recruiting: How algorithms hold women back

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The odds are still stacked against women's success in the workplace, and artificial intelligence (AI) is only making it worse, a new report released on Tuesday claims. Because algorithms used in human resources systems are built on historical data reflecting past bias against women in the workplace, they tend to disadvantage women throughout their careers, according to the study, published on International Women's Day in a joint collaboration between UNESCO, the OECD and the Inter-American Development Bank. Here's a look at how AI bias in the workplace happens - and how it might be tackled. Workers increasingly find new opportunities through online jobs platforms, such as Indeed and LinkedIn and on social media like Facebook and Twitter. The algorithms on these platforms influence which job opportunities people learn about, and how well-suited they perceive themselves to be for a particular role.


Good Old-Fashioned Artificial Intelligence and other weird and wonderful AI trivia

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The first ultraintelligent machine is the last invention that man needs ever make, provided that the machine is docile enough to tell us how to keep it under control, said Oxford philosopher Nick Bostrom. His book, Superintelligence, is a crystal ball on AI's timeline and the future of humanity. Inarguably, artificial intelligence has become an integral part of our lives. Here, we look at the AI breakthroughs that precipitated this paradigm shift. In 1956, John McCarthy, one of the founding fathers of AI, coined the term "artificial intelligence" during the Dartmouth workshop in 1956.


La veille de la cybersécurité

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AI influences nearly 8 billion people and human & earth diverse ecosystems on an unprecedented scale. Startups accelerate to incorporate AI innovation as AI tools proliferate. UNESCO is the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. The UNESCO recommendations on the ethics of AI recently adopted by member states provides a foundational global agreement on AI Ethics. The objectives ultimately drive emerging AI driven technologies that are trustworthy, safe, human-centered for the benefit of people and humanity.


UNESCO Forum on AI and Education engages international partners to ensure AI as a common good for education

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Under the theme "Ensuring AI as a Common Good to Transform Education", the 2021 International Forum on Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Education convened policy-makers and practitioners from around the world on 7 and 8 December 2021. The goal was to share knowledge on how governance can be aligned to direct AI towards the common good for education and humanity, and how countries are leveraging AI to deliver the unfulfilled promises and enable the futures of learning. The Forum was co-organized by UNESCO and China with the support of the Inter-UN-Agency Working Group on Artificial Intelligence. It convened approximately 74 speakers including 17 Ministers or Vice Ministers, from UN agencies, international organizations and more than 40 countries around the world. During the two-day event, the Forum attracted more than 9,000 real-time participants and viewers from more than 100 countries.


Global Agreement Defines The Ethics Of Artificial Intelligence – OpEd

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A historic agreement defines the common values and principles needed to ensure the healthy development of Artificial Intelligence (AI). All the member states of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) have signed the agreement. The importance of the agreement signed on November 23 is underlined by the fact that AI is pervasive and enables many of our daily routines--booking flights, steering driverless cars, and personalising our morning news feeds. AI also supports the decision-making of governments and the private sector. Artificial intelligence is present in everyday life, from booking flights and applying for loans to steering driverless cars.


In search of an ethical Artificial Intelligence that restores our faith in ourselves - Market Research Telecast

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At the end of last month, a set of principles and advice on ethics in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) was known, adopted for the first time jointly and unanimously by the 193 member states of the General Council of the UNESCO. Beyond the uniqueness of its universal character, it is about Unesco launched a guide to improve the relationship between humans and robots and combines ethical issues to a warning voice that has been heard for a long time. There are already several international political organizations that have been warning about the need to provide an ethical component to what is undoubtedly the most notable advance in applied science of our time. In fact, in November but from '19 the European Union (EU) had published its Ethical Guidelines for a reliable artificial intelligence whose proposal revolves around the collateral effects, or unforeseen risks, that the implementation of disruptive technologies like this can generate. Likewise, in April of this year we learned about the European Commission regulation regarding the use of algorithms able to learn and make decisions.


AI for all by Gabriela Ramos in New Scientist 4 December 2021 - The Sentient Robot

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They include Russia, China and Iran. The signatories are obliged to bring in laws dictating how AI may and may not be used. The agreement aims to remove discrimination from AI and limit mass surveillance of people going about their daily business. But there are no sanctions for rule-breakers. One could, therefore, reasonably argue that the agreement allows countries to look as if they are signing up to a worthy cause whilst in practice they do not change anything.


Global Big Data Conference

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Individual human rights, privacy and the free press are under siege in an increasing number of countries around the world. Liberty itself is being challenged by authoritarian governments whose power is enhanced by the unethical use of social media, facial recognition technology and the ability to intercept private communications. Even in democracies, disinformation and doctored videos are often used on social media to undermine confidence in political leaders. Conspiracy theories abound, amplified by unregulated technology. As we have seen in the United States, democracy is threatened when a high percentage of citizens lose confidence in governance and the electoral system.