uber


A driver tricked Uber's algorithm, sexually assaulted a passenger

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In December 2018, a man driving an authorized Uber vehicle picked up an intoxicated woman leaving a Christmas party -- and then brought her to his home and raped her. But the man, who The Age reports was sentenced to five and a half years in prison on Wednesday, was not an authorized Uber driver. Rather, he was able to easily fool Uber's verification system by holding up a photo of a real driver. In other words, the AI technology that Uber uses to verify that its drivers are who they claim to be -- like Amazon delivery drivers, Uber contractors take a selfie when signing on -- wasn't sophisticated enough to spot a printed headshot. It's a horrifying story that illustrates the perils of big tech offloading security to dodgy AI systems.


2018 in Review: 10 AI Failures

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Last December Synced compiled its first "Artificial Intelligence Failures" recap of AI gaffes from the previous year. AI has achieved remarkable progress, and many scientists dream of creating the Master Algorithm proposed by Pedro Domingos -- which can solve all problems envisioned by humans. It's unavoidable however that researchers, fledgling technologies and biased data will also produce blunders not envisioned by humans. That's why a review of AI failures is necessary and meaningful: The aim of the article is not to downplay or mock research and development results, but to take a look at what went wrong with the hope we can do better next time. Traffic police in major Chinese cities are using AI to address jaywalking.


Waymo eyes deploying self-driving technology in trucking: CEO Krafcik - Reuters

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FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Waymo is exploring deploying its self-driving technology in the trucking industry, CEO John Krafcik said on Thursday, as it works with industry partners to seize a commercial opportunity from a looming shortage of human drivers. Waymo, backed by Alphabet Inc's (GOOGL.O) Google, has so far focused on so-called robotaxis but, in remarks prepared for a speech to the Frankfurt motor show, Krafcik said the self-driving technology, Waymo Driver, was also suited to steering road freight. "Ride-hailing is an important application of our Driver," Krafcik told political and industry leaders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel, at the event's official opening. "Our technology can also make trucking safer and stronger, and fill a pressing need for more drivers in many parts of the world. "We've already conducted road tests of the Waymo Driver in Class 8 trucks across the U.S., and we're working closely with the ecosystem -- shippers, truck makers, and Tier One suppliers -- to ensure a successful deployment." Industry experts and analysts forecast a severe shortage of truck drivers in aging societies, including Germany, leading mobility players including Uber (UBER.N) to develop applications that aim to boost the sector's efficiency. Ten-year-old Waymo is widely viewed as the leader of the self-driving race, but attaining the holy grail of full and safe automation remains challenging as companies in the field seek to recoup their research and development costs. "Our journey has been a long one, but there is still a long road ahead.


Your Car Will Probably Be Driven By A Remote Human Before A Computer

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If we've learned anything from Silicon Valley, it's to over-promise and under-deliver. And if we've learned anything else from Silicon Valley, it's that replacing humans with artificial intelligence is not nearly as easy as it sounds. Put these two tendencies together, and you get an awful lot of humans performing grunt work that tech companies previously wanted to automate away only to find they couldn't write algorithms that performed as well as any human could. The first examples that immediately jump to mind are content moderation on the major social networks, transcribing recordings from smart speakers, and Elon Musk's attempt to automate the Tesla assembly line only to admit "humans are underrated." Don't look now, but self-driving cars are a prime candidate to be the latest major "automation" technology that is performed not by a computer, but by a human you can't see.


Artificial intelligence: an open source future

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is transforming everything in our daily lives, from customer experience and healthcare to manufacturing and agriculture. In fact, in the UK alone investment for AI developers from venture capital increased more than 200 per cent last year. This comes as no surprise when you consider the growing number of AI startups being founded. According to a recent study from Stanford University, in the last 20 years there has been a 14-times increase in the number of AI startups. At the same time, we're seeing an increasing number of technology companies invest in AI development.


The applications of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the Telecoms industry

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Last week, I spoke at the Swiss Mobile Association. The event was held at one of the oldest cross-functional research institutes Gottlieb Duttweiler Institute just outside Zurich. Prior to being involved in IoT and AI, I worked for many years in Telecoms. So, this was a nice time to catch up with a few ideas for AI for Telecoms I believe that from an innovation standpoint – we are living in a post-mobile world. Today, just as the Web itself, Mobile is a mature industry.


When the A.I. Professor Leaves, Students Suffer, Study Says

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The tech and automobile industries have aggressively pursued the idea of a driverless car, drawing another wave of academics out of the universities. In 2015, Uber hired 40 people from a Carnegie Mellon robotics lab, including research professors. Since then, industry interest in artificial intelligence of all kinds has increased, according to the study. Google and DeepMind, both owned by Alphabet, have hired 23 professors. Amazon has hired 17, Microsoft has hired 13, and Uber, Nvidia and Facebook have each hired seven.


Self-driving cars could be built without mirrors and a STEERING WHEEL

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Waymo, the self-driving car unit of Google parent Alphabet, is pushing to get rid of many traditional car features, including mirrors, pedals and the steering wheel. It urged the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to'promptly' remove regulatory barriers for cars necessitating they have all traditional features. Legislation controlling the manufacture of cars dictates they must meet more than 70 auto safety standards, even if they are redundant. Waymo says a lot of the rules are not vital to self-driving cars because they work and operate in a completely different way to traditional vehicles. Waymo urged the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to'promptly' remove regulatory barriers for cars necessitating they have traditional features (file photo) Waymo, as well as Honda, Uber and Lyft, penned a letter to NHTSA asking for progress to be made in refining the rules to help streamline the development of autonomous cars.


3 Examples of AI at Work in DataOps - DevOps.com

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is making all the difference between innovators and laggards in the global marketplace. Yet, implementing a state-of-the-art DataOps operation involves a long-term commitment to putting in place the right people, processes and tools that will deliver results. In this post, we look at three organizations that are doing cutting-edge work in the field of DataOps. We look at the specific strategies they use and the results they've seen as they navigate the uncharted waters of DataOps. Uber is very vocal about the way it leverages AI across its apps and services globally.


Church that Worships AI God May Be the Way of the Future

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Former Google and Uber engineer Anthony Levandowski, according to a recent Backchannel profile, filed paperwork with the state of California in 2015 to establish Way of the Future, a nonprofit religious corporation dedicated to worshiping AI. The church's mission, according to paperwork obtained by Backchannel, is "to develop and promote the realization of a Godhead based on artificial intelligence and through understanding and worship of the Godhead contribute to the betterment of society." The documents show Levandowski is CEO and President of Way of the Future. Presumably there was no option for High Priest. Author and religious studies scholar Candi Cann, who teaches comparative religion at Baylor University, said Levandowski's spiritual initiative isn't necessarily that odd from a historical perspective.