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Has artificial intelligence (AI) really lived up to the hype?

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Regardless of the industry you work in, you've no doubt heard about artificial intelligence (AI) and its potential in changing the world around us. The technology has been a source of debate in the private and public sectors for more than 50 years, and yet it has only been in the last decade that we've begun to really see momentum build in the AI space. But what actually is AI? Leaving the jargon to one side, it should simply be understood as the use of computer systems to perform tasks that would normally require human intelligence. To date, there has been some significant progress made in the adoption of AI technologies, with industries from financial services to healthcare demonstrating a keen willingness to use AI to their advantage. At the same time, investment has been pouring in at unprecedented levels; investment into UK AI businesses alone now exceeds £3.8 billion according to Big Innovation Centre and Deep Knowledge Analytics.


Tesla Smart Summon: Why self-driving cars aren't ready for roads

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Since Tesla rolled out the Smart Summon, a feature that enables Model 3 owners to "summon" their car remotely, the technology has been subject to much testing. The limited self-driving technology has seen hundreds of thousands of tests, and many users have published their experience. The results have been mixed, with the mistakes receiving more highlights than the successful performances. Smart Summon is one several technologies that aims to eventually transform Tesla cars into full self-driving vehicles. Tesla activated it for the owners of the Model 3 who had paid a $6,000 upfront fee at the end of September.


For Autonomous Vehicles, The Road Ahead is Paved With Data

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This is an updated version of a story that initially appeared in Interglobix Magazine, the publication for data centers, connectivity and lifestyle. The road to the self-driving car of the future is paved with hardware and data centers. Autonomous vehicles promise to be one of the transformational technologies of the 21st century, with the potential to remake much of our urban and economic landscape. But many questions remain about how the connected car of 2019 will evolve to meet the vision for the autonomous vehicles of the future, and tough issues to be resolved on multiple fronts – including technology, regulation and infrastructure. The long-term vision is to create networks of connected vehicles that "talk" to one another using vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications over low-latency wireless connections, which can also allow vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) that enable robot cars to connect with traffic lights and parking meters.


Full Autonomy In Sight As Tesla Acquires DeepScale

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Word on the street is that Tesla has now equipped its ever-growing tech-arsenal in the form of DeepScale. This UC Berkeley computer vision startup has proved their mettle last year with their work on SqueezeNet and Carver 21. The news of this acquisition was followed by DeepScale CEO's Forrest Iandola post on social media announcing his association with Tesla as a senior staff machine learning scientist. I joined the @Tesla #Autopilot team this week. I am looking forward to working with some of the brightest minds in #deeplearning and #autonomousdriving.


Tesla comes when called, but can fray nerves

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Roddie Hasan loves his Tesla, but after a fright using a feature that lets him summon the car as he might a dog, he says he will be walking to get it. The electric vehicle maker, a contender in the technology race to fully self-driving cars, last month issued a software update that included a "Smart Summon" feature for having Teslas go to owners instead of the other way around. A smartphone app acts as a remote control, and Tesla advised owners to keep their cars in sight the whole time. Stepping from a pizzeria into a quiet parking lot, Hasan decided to "summon" his Tesla Model 3. He watched as the car eased out of its stall and headed in his direction.


Fastest Self-Driving Cars at 175 MPH – NextBigFuture.com

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Roborace is the world's first competition for human AI teams, using both self-driving and manually-controlled cars. Race formats will feature new forms of immersive entertainment to engage the next generation of racing fans. Through sport, innovations in machine-driven technologies will be accelerated. A self-driving car has set a speed record of 175 mph. In November 2017, Musk said the next Tesla Roadster would have three motors and be able to travel a whopping 0 to 60 miles per hour in 1.9 seconds with a top speed of 250 mph or even more.


The Modern-Day Future

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On February 6, 2018, Elon Musk's SpaceX launched the Falcon Heavy rocket, the largest ever, from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Its cargo was a Tesla Roadster, which is now orbiting the sun somewhere between Mars and the asteroid belt. Between Elon Musk's numerous companies and passion projects (SpaceX, Tesla, Solar City, the Hyperloop, the Boring Company), and the quickly proceeding advances in VR/AR/MR, genetics/cloning, blockchain, AI, 3D printing, and other fields, someone who was in a coma since 1998 and just woke up yesterday would be forgiven for thinking they had jumped a hundred years into the future instead of a mere 20. But then this person would actually get up and go out into the real world and see that mostly everything else is the same, aside from more traffic on the roads, more people in general, most of whom now carry miniature computers with them wherever they go that are more powerful than any desktop from the 20th century. Born in apartheid-era South Africa, he lived the first 16 years of his life in various towns, including Pretoria, moving back and forth between divorced parents.


Tesla's AI Acquisition: A New Way For Autonomous Driving?

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FILE - In this March 14, 2019, file photo Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks before unveiling the Model Y at Tesla's design studio in Hawthorne, Calif. Musk says in an internal memo that Tesla has enough orders to set a record, but it's having trouble This week Tesla acquired DeepScale, which is a startup that focuses on developing computer vision technologies (the price of the deal was not disclosed). This appears to be a part of the company's focus on building an Uber-like service as well building fully autonomous vehicles. Founded in 2015, DeepScale has raised $15 million from investors like Point72, next47, Andy Bechtolsheim, Ali Partovi, and Jerry Yang. The founders include Forrest Iandola and Kurt Keutzer, who are both PhD's.


Tesla reportedly buys machine-learning startup DeepScale for self-driving car tech

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Tesla is determined to win the autonomous race without lidar. Tesla has big plans in store, if we're to follow CEO Elon Musk's timeframe laid out during the Autonomy Investor Day. In an effort to achieve these goals, the electric-car maker may have made a solid purchase. CNBC reported Tuesday that Tesla has fully acquired a tech startup company called DeepScale. The startup focuses on computer vision and not on lidar, which many other companies and automakers bank out to give their self-driving car prototypes the gift of sight.


Silicon Valley's Anti-Autonomy Backlash Is Afraid Of The Wrong Things

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Humans are good at a lot of things, but when it comes to assessing risk in the modern world we have some serious limitations. It's not uncommon to be plagued with fear and anxiety while flying, for example, but the same people who quake at the thought of trusting their life to an airliner will often treat the far more dangerous task of driving with baffling nonchalance. It should be no surprise then, that people are also wildly off the mark when it comes to assessing the risks presented by public road testing of autonomous vehicles. This misperception of risk is dramatically illustrated in a recent story by Washington Post reporter Faiz Siddiqui, which uncovers a kind of NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard) backlash against AVs in the heart of Silicon Valley. Siddiqui spoke with a number of Valley residents, most of whom work in the tech sector and believe in the long term potential of self-driving cars, who object to being what one terms "the guinea pig" for this new technology.