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Parliamentary committee makes history by taking evidence from a ROBOT

Daily Mail

British MPs made history today as they took evidence from a robot for the first time ever. Pepper the robot spoke to the education select committee on the rise of artificial intelligence and how UK schools should respond. The stunt was the first time a non-human has been invited to speak to Parliament in its 700-year history. Pepper, who spoke in an America accent, is a humanoid robot based at the University of Middlesex. Education Select Committee chairman and Tory MP Robert Halfon invited the machine to speak to MPs after being impressed with her on a visit to the university.


MIT commits $1 billion to make AI part of every graduate's education

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The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) today announced a $1 billion initiative to reshape how the college operates and make artificial intelligence a part of its curriculum for all students. The shakeup is being made, MIT president L. Rafael Reif said, to "prepare students of today for the world of the future" and represents the biggest change to curriculum at the school since the 1950s. The effort will be spearheaded by a $350 million donation from from Blackstone investment firm CEO Stephen Schwarzman. An additional $300 million has been raised for the $1 billion project. The Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing will work on incorporating computing and AI into all fields of study at MIT, encouraging cross-disciplinary endeavors, and exploring ways to create a shared structure between the university's five existing schools.


How Artificial Intelligence is creating jobs, not killing

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Dozens of employers looking to hire the next generation of tech employees descended on the University of California, Berkeley in September to meet students at an electrical engineering and computer science career fair. Boris Yue, 20, was one of thousands of student attendees, threading his way among fellow job-seekers to meet recruiters. But Yue wasn't worried about so much potential competition. While the job outlook for those with computer skills is generally good, Yue is in an even more rarified category: he is studying artificial intelligence, working on technology that teaches machines to learn and think in ways that mimic human cognition. His choice of specialty makes it unlikely he will have difficulty finding work.


MIT is investing $1 billion in an AI college

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Ever since the beginning of the AI boom in the early 2010s, there's been a corresponding drought in talented AI developers and researchers. The way to fix this is to educate more of them, and today, MIT announced a $1 billion initiative to do exactly that: it will establish a new college of computing to train the next generation of machine learning mavens. Instead, it will focus on what MIT president L. Rafael Reif calls "the bilinguals of the future." By that, he means students in fields like biology, chemistry, physics, politics, history, and linguistics who also know how to apply machine learning to these disciplines. Two-thirds of the planned $1 billion commitment has been raised so far, with $350 million coming from Stephen A. Schwarzman, CEO of the private equity firm Blackstone.


MIT announces $1 billion outlay for study of artificial intelligence, computing - The Boston Globe

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The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is pumping $1 billion into a new center for the study of the "global opportunities and challenges presented by the prevalence of computing and the rise of artificial intelligence," the school said Monday. In a statement, MIT said the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing will open in September 2019 as "an interdisciplinary hub for work in computer science, AI, data science, and related fields." A $350 million foundational gift from Schwarzman, head of the massive investment firm Blackstone, will get the project rolling. In addition to Schwarzman's gift, MIT has raised another $300 million for the college that bears his name, with further fundraising being "actively pursued" to raise the $1 billion needed for the learning hub, the statement said. "The College's attention to ethics matters enormously to me, because we will never realize the full potential of these advancements unless they are guided by a shared understanding of their moral implications for society," Schwarzman said in the release.


How Machine Learning Will Transform eLearning - eLearning Industry

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Ever since the packet switching network known as ARPANET was demilitarized and turned over to academic researchers in the late 1970s, the fields of Information Technology and education have crossed paths and formed partnerships for the benefit and improvement of society. The activities we know as eLearning and online education today will become the standards of academic instruction tomorrow, and the manner courses are delivered will be determined by Artificial Intelligence. The technological advances listed above have unfolded over four decades; academic researchers believe that the next wave of tech progress in education will involve machine learning and other fields of AI development. The first ripples of this wave are already here, and they involve algorithms and natural language processing. Botsify, for example, is a smart chatbot platform designed specifically for the education sector, but this is only the beginning.


As companies embrace AI, it's a job-seeker's market

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SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Dozens of employers looking to hire the next generation of tech employees descended on the University of California, Berkeley in September to meet students at an electrical engineering and computer science career fair. Boris Yue, 20, was one of thousands of student attendees, threading his way among fellow job-seekers to meet recruiters. But Yue wasn't worried about so much potential competition. While the job outlook for those with computer skills is generally good, Yue is in an even more rarified category: he is studying artificial intelligence, working on technology that teaches machines to learn and think in ways that mimic human cognition. His choice of specialty makes it unlikely he will have difficulty finding work.


FAQ on the newly established MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing

MIT News

This set of FAQs offers information about the founding of the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, announced today, and its implications for the MIT community and beyond. Q: What is MIT announcing today that's new? A: Today MIT is announcing a $1 billion commitment to address the global opportunities and challenges presented by the ubiquity of computing -- across industries and academic disciplines -- and by the rise of artificial intelligence. At the heart of this endeavor will be the new MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, made possible by a foundational $350 million gift from Stephen Schwarzman, the chairman, CEO, and co-founder of Blackstone, a leading global asset manager. An additional $300 million has been secured for the College through other fundraising.


Letter to the MIT community regarding the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing

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The following email was sent today to the MIT community by President L. Rafael Reif. The 2010 history, Becoming MIT: Moments of Decision, credits MIT's record of rising impact to turning points when, responding to new challenges, MIT stayed true to its mission with a calculated change of course. Today, at a turning point of equal consequence, we launch the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing. This new College is our strategic response to a global phenomenon -- the ubiquity of computing and the rise of AI. In this new world, we are building on MIT's established leadership in these fields to position the Institute for decades to come as a world hub of education, research and innovation, and to prepare our students to lead in every domain.


As Companies Embrace AI, It's a Job-Seeker's Market

U.S. News

Liz Holm, a materials science and engineering professor at Carnegie Melon, saw the increased demand first-hand in May, when one of her graduating PhD students, who used machine learning methods for her research, was overwhelmed with job offers, none of which were in materials science and all of them AI-related. Eventually the student took a job with Proctor & Gamble, where she uses AI to figure out where to put items on store shelves around the globe. "Companies are really hungry for these folks right now," Holm said.