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Artificial Intelligence and education: moving beyond the hype

#artificialintelligence

We are living in an age of disruption and one of the drivers of that change is a development that many people call Artificial Intelligence. It is a very broad heading under which many people seem to pin their hopes and fears. AI has been portrayed as an existential threat to humanity, or as just an excel sheet on steroids. Some, like Ray Kurzweil, point towards the Singularity when we reach real Artificial Intelligence. Just like a gravitational singularity where gravitational tidal forces become infinite this Singularity will be an Event Horizon- a point of no return -- a place and time which we can't see beyond.


AI that can teach? It's already happening

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Artificial intelligence could be heading to Australian classrooms -- and in schools overseas, it's already there. In Bahia, Brazil, 15-year-old students David and Roama from Colegio Perfil often start their school day at home, or on the bus. They pick up their phones, log into the education app Geekie Lab, and begin their classes from wherever they are. "You can access it everywhere, as long as you have your phone with you," David said. Students from Colegio Perfil in Bahia use phones or computers to access the Geekie app.


AI that can teach? It's already happening

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence could be heading to Australian classrooms -- and in schools overseas, it's already there. In Bahia, Brazil, 15-year-old students David and Roama from Colegio Perfil often start their school day at home, or on the bus. They pick up their phones, log into the education app Geekie Lab, and begin their classes from wherever they are. "You can access it everywhere, as long as you have your phone with you," David said.


AI senses people's pose through walls

#artificialintelligence

X-ray vision has long seemed like a far-fetched sci-fi fantasy, but over the last decade a team led by Professor Dina Katabi from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) has continually gotten us closer to seeing through walls. Their latest project, "RF-Pose," uses artificial intelligence (AI) to teach wireless devices to sense people's postures and movement, even from the other side of a wall. The researchers use a neural network to analyze radio signals that bounce off people's bodies, and can then create a dynamic stick figure that walks, stops, sits and moves its limbs as the person performs those actions. The team says that the system could be used to monitor diseases like Parkinson's and multiple sclerosis (MS), providing a better understanding of disease progression and allowing doctors to adjust medications accordingly. It could also help elderly people live more independently, while providing the added security of monitoring for falls, injuries and changes in activity patterns.


10 gifts that high school grads will be *so glad* they have for college

Mashable

If you haven't yet realized by the 15 grad party invites hanging on your fridge, it's high school graduation season. Grads everywhere are expecting to be congratulated for making it through four years of waking up at 6 am, just to go to school to learn trigonometry that they will never use again ever. There's a ton of boring stuff that they'll need but definitely won't be excited to get (under the bed storage is just not as exciting as it used to be) and then there's the stuff that they want. You know, the VR gaming gear, the nice TV, the cool decorations -- everything that will make them the cool kid in the dorm. If you're trying to be the cool friend or family member who doesn't gift a vacuum, this is the wishlist you'll want to use.


Futurists in Ethiopia are betting on artificial intelligence to drive development

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"I don't think Homo sapiens-type people will exist in 10 or 20 years' time," Getnet Assefa, 31, speculates as he gazes into the reconstructed eye sockets of Lucy, one of the oldest and most famous hominid skeletons known, at the National Museum of Ethiopia. "Slowly the biological species will disappear and then we will become a fully synthetic species," Assefa says. "Perception, memory, emotion, intelligence, dreams--everything that we value now--will not be there," he adds. Assefa is a computer scientist, a futurist, and a utopian--but a pragmatic one at that. He is founder and chief executive of iCog, the first artificial intelligence (AI) lab in Ethiopia, and a stone's throw from the home of Lucy.


8 Ways Machine Learning Will Improve Education - The Tech Edvocate

#artificialintelligence

Education is moving away from traditional rows of students looking at the same textbook while a teacher lectures from the front of the room. Today's classrooms are not simply evolving to use more technology and digital resources; they are also investing in machine learning. Machine learning is defined as "a field of computer science that uses statistical techniques to give computer systems the ability to "learn" (i.e., progressively improve performance on a specific task) with data, without being explicitly programmed." For example, in education, we see machine learning in learning analytics and artificial intelligence. Machine learning is essentially mining data.


Deep Learning: Turkey's biggest artificial intelligence community

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As the number of people who work on a volunteer basis or try to contribute for good causes increase in Turkey, we look to the future with confidence. Furthermore, if these volunteers comprise of scientists, academicians and youths, supporting such formations mean paving the way of social developments. The Deep Learning Turkey community, which teaches and guides high school students and undergraduates, turning artificial intelligence into a social responsibility project, has reached out to thousands of youths although it was established only in August of last year. The community helps youths who are interested in artificial intelligence and want to have a career in this field as well as providing information sharing on an open platform for scientists. Deep Learning Turkey is the biggest and the most effective artificial intelligence community in Turkey.


AI senses people's pose through walls

#artificialintelligence

Their latest project, "RF-Pose," uses artificial intelligence (AI) to teach wireless devices to sense people's postures and movement, even from the other side of a wall. The researchers use a neural network to analyze radio signals that bounce off people's bodies, and can then create a dynamic stick figure that walks, stops, sits and moves its limbs as the person performs those actions. The team says that the system could be used to monitor diseases like Parkinson's and multiple sclerosis (MS), providing a better understanding of disease progression and allowing doctors to adjust medications accordingly. It could also help elderly people live more independently, while providing the added security of monitoring for falls, injuries and changes in activity patterns. For future real-world applications, the team plans to implement a "consent mechanism" in which the person who installs the device is cued to do a specific set of movements in order for it to begin to monitor the environment.)


Artificial intelligence senses people through walls

MIT News

X-ray vision has long seemed like a far-fetched sci-fi fantasy, but over the last decade a team led by Professor Dina Katabi from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) has continually gotten us closer to seeing through walls. Their latest project, "RF-Pose," uses artificial intelligence (AI) to teach wireless devices to sense people's postures and movement, even from the other side of a wall. The researchers use a neural network to analyze radio signals that bounce off people's bodies, and can then create a dynamic stick figure that walks, stops, sits, and moves its limbs as the person performs those actions. The team says that RF-Pose could be used to monitor diseases like Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis (MS), and muscular dystrophy, providing a better understanding of disease progression and allowing doctors to adjust medications accordingly. It could also help elderly people live more independently, while providing the added security of monitoring for falls, injuries and changes in activity patterns.