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AI the Next Step for Education: Tech Innovations Changing Our Classrooms

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Imagine a human-like teacher with no human flaws. The best educators in the world sometimes suffer from innate human errors, taking different forms in every one of us. They will eventually grow tired and nervous. Not even the best of them can provide personal attention to a class of 30. Computers never sleep; the knowledge they impart is available 24/7 across continents, time zones, and devices.


Google's chief decision scientist: Humans can fix AI's shortcomings

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Cassie Kozyrkov has served in various technical roles at Google over the past five years, but she now holds the somewhat curious position of "chief decision scientist." Decision science sits at the intersection of data and behavioral science and involves statistics, machine learning, psychology, economics, and more. In effect, this means Kozyrkov helps Google push a positive AI agenda -- or, at the very least, convince people that AI isn't as bad as the headlines claim. "Robots are stealing our jobs," "AI is humanity's greatest existential threat," and similar proclamations have abounded for a while, but over the past few years such fears have become more pronounced. Conversational AI assistants now live in our homes, cars and trucks are pretty much able to drive themselves, machines can beat humans at computer games, and even the creative arts are not immune to the AI onslaught.


Google's chief decision scientist: Humans can fix AI's shortcomings

#artificialintelligence

Cassie Kozyrkov has served in various technical roles at Google over the past five years, but she now holds the somewhat curious position of "chief decision scientist." Decision science sits at the intersection of data and behavioral science and involves statistics, machine learning, psychology, economics, and more. In effect, this means Kozyrkov helps Google push a positive AI agenda -- or, at the very least, convince people that AI isn't as bad as the headlines claim. "Robots are stealing our jobs," "AI is humanity's greatest existential threat," and similar proclamations have abounded for a while, but over the past few years such fears have become more pronounced. Conversational AI assistants now live in our homes, cars and trucks are pretty much able to drive themselves, machines can beat humans at computer games, and even the creative arts are not immune to the AI onslaught.


AI careers unappealing to UK workers

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Only 39% of people are interested in a career in AI with 59% of those aged under 45, according to research by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and Kantar Public. The report, which was released for London Tech Week this week, also found a gender divide over interest in AI jobs. Just 31% of women said they'd be interested compared to 47% of men. More than 60% of people were excited to see what AI can do, however, and awareness levels of AI in everyday life were found to be more than 60%. But there appeared to be low awareness around the impact of AI on work.


How do we restore the art of teaching in a world of AI?

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It's another week, and there's another AI sales pitch to tell us all that robots can reduce workload and teach students better. That teachers aren't good enough at differentiation: robots can spot the gaps in pupils' learning more quickly and, using sophisticated algorithms, come up with instant tasks to bridge the gap and pave the way to success. Sadly, the idea that AI can cure all ills has been around too long unchallenged – except by dinosaurs like me. Somehow we've all begun to believe that pupils are empty vessels and – worse still – they are programmable. We may live in a technological age and we may be up to our eyeballs in glitzy apps.


University of South Carolina announces AI institute EdScoop

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The University of South Carolina announced plans last week to open an artificial intelligence institute that give students and faculty a shared space for interdisciplinary collaboration. The institute, which the university hopes to have running by this fall, will focus on research to advance AI applications across a wide range of industries, Hossein Haj-Hariri, dean of the College of Engineering and Computing, told EdScoop. "[Industries] are already being transformed or will be transformed by artificial intelligence," Haj-Hariri said. "The window where we can really lead the injection of research into application areas is open," he said. To drive innovation and develop cutting-edge solutions using AI, the institute will draw on the knowledge and experience of students and faculty from all 15 colleges across the university's campus, making it a hub for interdisciplinary collaboration.


matloff/R-vs.-Python-for-Data-Science

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This Web page is aimed at shedding some light on the perennial R-vs.-Python debates in the Data Science community. As a professional computer scientist and statistician, I hope to shed some useful light on the topic. I have potential bias -- I've written 4 R-related books, and currently serve as Editor-in-Chief of the R Journal -- but I hope this analysis will be considered fair and helpful. This is subjective, of course, but having written (and taught) in many different programming languages, I really appreciate Python's greatly reduced use of parentheses and braces: This is of particular interest to me, as an educator. I've taught a number of subjects -- math, stat, CS and even English As a Second Language -- and have given intense thought to the learning process for many, many years.


What is AI bias?

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"Bias" is an overloaded term which means remarkably different things in different contexts. Here are just a few definitions of bias for your perusal. There are quite a few meanings here, and some of them are spicier than others. The young discipline of ML/AI has a habit of borrowing jargon from every-which-where (sometimes seemingly without looking up the original meaning), so when people talk about bias in AI, they might be referring to any one of several definitions above. Imagine getting yourself prepared for the emotional catharsis of an ornate paper promising to fix bias in AI… only to discover (several pages in) that the bias they're talking about is the statistical one.


Commentary: IBM CEO Ginni Rometty: The Future of Work Depends on Education Reform

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I am often asked about artificial intelligence and the future of work. My answer is that A.I. will change 100% of current jobs. It will change the job of a software developer, of a customer service agent, of a professional driver. And it will change my job as the CEO of one of the biggest technology companies in the world. Yet notice my choice of words: A.I. will change jobs but it won't replace all of them.


2019: Chemistry with Scientific Computing School of Chemistry

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The School of Chemistry at the University of Bristol is at the forefront of applying computing to chemistry, from simulating complex materials and biomolecular systems on supercomputers, developing workflows for robotic chemical synthesis, to using modern machine learning algorithms and advanced visualisation to understand and predict chemical behaviours. To get the most out of scientific computing we need a new type of scientist, who combines a firm grounding in chemistry with strong skills in computing as well as a clear understanding of what can be achieved by merging them. Our new degrees will address this emerging skills gap, allowing students to apply their enthusiasm for computing in chemistry, whether that is learning to build machine learning frameworks for predicting spectra, script automation workflows or conduct quantum chemical calculations. In all this we keep chemistry at the core, enhancing it with the breadth of modern scientific computing, covering coding and software engineering, visualisation and virtual reality, data analysis, machine learning, deep learning and AI, as well as modern hardware and computing resources, such as cloud computing, GPUs and high-performance computing architectures. With these skills, our graduates will be well placed in the future job market where employers are ever-more focussed on this combination of skills and experience.