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ShakespeAIre: Artificial Intelligence absorbs Bard's sonnets to create original poetry

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Shakespeare's sonnets are considered some of the literary genius' most popular works, with some - such as Sonnet 18's "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day" - becoming the best-known works in English literature. And with such a wealth of source material at their disposal, scientists at Zyro set themselves a pioneering challenge to mark National Poetry Day - to teach artificial intelligence the art form using Shakespeare's sonnets.


Don't Fear the Super AI

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Let me put it this way: I'm not worried about invisible people teleporting into my bedroom, so you shouldn't be worried about an all-powerful Super AI. This topic is a strange one, as the reason to write about it is to tell you that it doesn't merit writing about. The discussion about Super AI is about as important as discussions like "what should we do when teleportation is readily available to everyone?" or "how can we pair the right to privacy with the right become invisible?" As a matter of fact, talking about the mere concept of a Super AI is more harmful than you might think because it gives the impression that "AI" already has a solid foundation and the risks are looming large. The idea of a Super AI is a fantasy extrapolated from science by Hollywood in the same way that teleportation and invisibility science fiction is conjured out of tidbits of science fact.


The Power of Graph Databases, Linked Data, and Graph Algorithms

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In 2019, I was asked to write the Foreword for the book "Graph Algorithms: Practical Examples in Apache Spark and Neo4j", by Mark Needham and Amy E. Hodler. I wrote an extensive piece on the power of graph databases, linked data, graph algorithms, and various significant graph analytics applications. In their wisdom, the editors of the book decided that I wrote "too much". So, they correctly shortened my contribution by about half in the final published version of my Foreword for the book. The book is awesome, an absolute must-have reference volume, and it is free (for now, downloadable from Neo4j).


Who Wrote 'Henry VIII'? This ML Algorithm Has Cast A Shadow On Shakespeare's Contribution

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It is a breakthrough to be able to use artificial intelligence and machine learning to find, identify and confirm the author of a text, and analyse the style of writing from a text collection. In the literary sector, the question of authorship has always been the main concern. A perfect case in point is the analysis of William Shakespeare and John Fletcher's work Henry VIII. Czech researcher Petr Plechac recently released a paper titled "Relative contributions of Shakespeare and Fletcher in Henry VIII", confirming scholar James Spedding's longstanding theory of having more than one formal author for Shakespeare's Henry VIII. Plechac developed a machine learning system that determined which portions of the historical play were written by which author.


Baby Yoda may rule Disney Plus, but this hidden gem is worth a look

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The first time I watched Gargoyles, a Disney cartoon about stone-winged creatures that come alive at night to fight evil, I was enraptured. This was something so dramatically different from anything I'd seen to that point. Thanks to Disney Plus, I had a chance to rewatch the show. My initial response 25 years later: How the hell did this show even get made? That isn't meant as a slight.


Robot Writers AI - How artificial intelligence is automating writing

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A new report finds that many publishers impressed by artificial intelligence generated writing and similar technologies are doing double-takes on its price tag. Essentially, 47% of key players in publishing surveyed say they like what they see, but they're uncertain that AI can deliver a solid return on investment. The irony, according to the researchers: Other evidence gleaned from the same survey shows even minimal investment in AI brings back significant sales increases for publishers. That additional investment coin could involve little more than hiring AI-savvy employees, or training existing employees in AI. "Those who have invested in artificial intelligence are happy with their experience and will continue to invest on all levels," the researchers observe. The study, "The Future Impact of Artificial Intelligence on the Publishing Industry" -- released Gould Finch and Frankfurter Buchmesse -- is available for free download.


Can AI Prove That Shakespeare Had Ghostwriters?

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For a long time, scholars have assumed that William Shakespeare (1564–1616) (below right) was not the only author of some famous plays that bear his name. A discerning reader does not need AI for that. An author's unique style is like a fingerprint. Some scenes just don't "sound like" his work (the technical term is "a stylistic departure"). A second author proposed for Henry VIII (1623), John Fletcher (1579–1625), has been proposed as early as 1850.


Using machine learning techniques to identify Shakespeare's and Fletcher's writing in Henry VIII

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Petr Plecháč, a researcher at the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague has used machine-learning techniques to identify which parts of the play "Henry VIII" were written by William Shakespeare and which were written by John Fletcher. He has written a paper describing his findings and has uploaded it to the arXiv preprint server. William Shakespeare lived and worked in the late 1500s to early 1600s, writing such famous works as "Hamlet," "Macbeth" and "Romeo and Juliet." He is also credited with writing "Henry VIII," though most historians agree that he had help doing so. Many believe his collaborator was a playwright by the name of John Fletcher.


Artificial Intelligence Reveals Second Playwright's Contributions to Shakespeare's 'Henry VIII'

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In the summer of 1613, an early performance of William Shakespeare's Henry VIII--then titled All is True--found the Globe Theater packed with spectators. Cannon fire sounded as the play's eponymous monarch walked onstage toward the end of the first act, captivating audience members to such an extent that they failed to notice a fiery prop landing on the theater's thatched roof. Within an hour, the Globe had been reduced to ash. New research suggests Shakespeare didn't pen the history play-turned-tragedy by himself. Since literary analyst James Spedding first raised the possibility in 1850, scholars have speculated that Henry VIII was actually a collaboration between the Bard and John Fletcher, who succeeded Shakespeare as house playwright of the King's Men acting company.


Researcher uses AI to unravel the mystery of Shakespeare's co-author

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After all these years, someone might have figured out exactly how much Shakespeare worked on one of his last plays. It's long been suspected that Shakespeare didn't write the whole of Henry VIII, but now, thanks to machine learning, we could know just how much he outsourced to a playwright friend. For those of you who aren't up on your Shakespeare, the notion that Henry VIII may have had more than one formal author is also a very old one, born from the fact that some of the scenes just don't "sound" like Shakespeare. His co-author is generally supposed to be his successor, John Fletcher. They also collaborated on The Two Noble Kinsmen: both of their names were on the published edition.