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Artificial intelligence will make you smarter

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The future won't be made by either humans or machines alone – but by both, working together. Technologies modeled on how human brains work are already augmenting people's abilities, and will only get more influential as society gets used to these increasingly capable machines. Technology optimists have envisioned a world with rising human productivity and quality of life as artificial intelligence systems take over life's drudgery and administrivia, benefiting everyone. Pessimists, on the other hand, have warned that these advances could come at great cost in lost jobs and disrupted lives. And fearmongers worry that AI might eventually make human beings obsolete.


Artificial intelligence will make you smarter

#artificialintelligence

Technologies modeled on how human brains work are already augmenting people's abilities, and will only get more influential as society gets used to these increasingly capable machines. Pessimists, on the other hand, have warned that these advances could come at great cost in lost jobs and disrupted lives. And fearmongers worry that AI might eventually make human beings obsolete. However, people are not very good at imagining the future. Neither utopia nor doomsday is likely.


How AI Is Changing How We Build Things

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SURE, COMPUTER ALGORITHMS ARE TAKING over tech and science and medicine … but the creatives are still safe, right? A new program from software developer Autodesk called Dreamcatcher (rendering above) can use A.I. techniques to assist human designers as they go about their creative tasks. Already in use by companies including Airbus, Under Armour, and Stanley Black & Decker, the software is an example of the burgeoning field of generative design. The software then produces hundreds or even thousands of options. As the human designer winnows the choices, the software susses out preferences and helps iterate even better options.


Stepping Into an Amazon Store Helps It Get Inside Your Head

WIRED

Infrared light flooded down invisibly as I eyed the pastries in Amazon's new convenience store in downtown San Francisco. It helped cameras mounted on the store's ceiling detect that I picked up a croissant, then put it back. My flirtation with a $3.19 morsel of flaky pastry was recorded during a preview of the Amazon Go store that opened in San Francisco's financial district this morning. As in the five other such stores in Seattle and Chicago, shoppers gain entry by scanning a QR code in the Amazon Go mobile app to open a subway-style entry gate. Hundreds of cameras on the ceiling, plus sensors in the shelves, then record what each person picks up, so they can walk out without having to visit a checkout.


10 IoT Security and Privacy Trends to Watch Lanner

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The Internet of Things is a source of consistent upheaval for the technological and operational aspects of our societies. Wave upon wave of technological innovation has brought us to the point at which we currently find ourselves. When it comes to technological innovation, especially within the IoT, privacy and security are two of the most relevant and exciting fields of development currently being discussed. In this article, we'll be looking at ten security and privacy trends within the Internet of Things that are becoming increasingly widespread in various industrial and commercial sectors around the world. Some of the trends featured in this list will focus primarily on security aspects within the IoT, whereas others may be more concerned with the issues of privacy such technologies face.


Ford set to launch fleet of robot taxis and delivery vehicles across Washington

Daily Mail

Ford is set to unveil a fleet of self driving cars in Washington. The firm's driverless fleet that will carry customers and make deliveries for businesses across all corners of the nation's capital. It is part of Ford's $4bn push into self driving vehicles. Ford's driverless fleet that will carry customers and make deliveries for businesses across all corners of the nation's capital. Ford said it would invest $4 billion through 2023 in its newly formed autonomous vehicle unit, Ford Autonomous Vehicles, as it looks to produce self-driving cars in the next three years.


From Agriculture to Art -- the A.I. Wave Sweeps In

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PlantVillage, a research and development project, based at Penn State University, is beginning to bring artificial intelligence to these smaller farms. Scientists at PlantVillage, in collaboration with international organizations, local farm extension programs and engineers at Google, is working to tailor A.I. technology for farmers in Tanzania who have inexpensive smartphones. The initial focus is on cassava, a hearty crop that can survive droughts and barren soil. But plant disease and pests can reduce crop yields by 40 percent or more. PlantVillage and International Institute of Tropical Agriculture have developed a simple A.I. assistant, called Nuru ("light" in Swahili).


Making the Consumer IoT Experience More Human by Embedding Service Into Things

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Brian Hannon, Chief Commercial Officer at Voxpro – powered by TELUS International (Voxpro), a company that focuses on improving the digital customer experience, believes the only companies marketing connected products to consumers who will win will be those who think through the entire customer journey as part of their product design, development and evolution. "We're working with companies in the fastest growing areas, and IoT is clearly one of those," Hannon said, adding that "companies who have their own approach to customer experience, companies that embed planning for CX to work within the design of product are succeeding, and are way ahead with customer satisfaction while taking advantage of the feedback loop to improve those products over time." Hannon wrote in a recent blog that "harnessing digital connections to foster deeper human connections is the highest opportunity of the internet of things," and believes that given more devices, more software, more systems and more human attachment to living digitally will continue to grow, and that brands marketing smart homes, smart cars, wearables and more will succeed when they increase customer engagement, rather than trying to avoid it with "self-service" approaches. "Some companies underestimate the power of not only deepening customer relationships but taking advantage of behavioral data fundamental to improving that product, or building new products and services based on that intelligence," Hannon said. And because more and more sensors (for example fall detection sensors built into wearables or smartphones, or motion detection sensors installed in the homes) integrate messaging, notifications and alerts, the journey is not just one taken by one consumer, but by people connected with that consumer.


Robotic indoor farms can grow food anywhere, anytime

ZDNet

Robots could turn a basic concept of farming on its head. What if, instead of growing crops in rows spread across many acres of land, food could be grown in vertical columns? A Cincinnati-based firm called 80 Acres Farms is testing this concept and seeking to prove that automated indoor farming can be safer and more profitable than traditional methods. Indoor farming controls environmental factors so that crops such as lettuce can be grown anywhere, anytime, making fresh food available year-round, regardless of location. A traditional farm might have three seasons, but Hamilton's new indoor farm is expected to turn over leafy greens every three weeks.


The Pixel 3's dual cameras are a tacit admission that AI can't do everything -- yet

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Google's latest flagship smartphones -- the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL -- are finally shipping to customers, and the reviews are unanimous: The rear camera and dual selfie cams are best in class. But as good as those cameras might be, they're a bit puzzling -- and sort of paradoxical. The original Pixel and Pixel XL have two cameras: one front and one rear. The Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL have two cameras: one front and one rear. And the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL have three cameras: two front and one rear.