self-driving car


Your next pilot could be drone software

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Would you get on a plane that didn't have a human pilot in the cockpit? Half of air travellers surveyed in 2017 said they would not, even if the ticket was cheaper. Modern pilots do such a good job that almost any air accident is big news, such as the Southwest engine disintegration on April 17. But stories of pilot drunkenness, rants, fights and distraction, however rare, are reminders that pilots are only human. Not every plane can be flown by a disaster-averting pilot, like Southwest Captain Tammie Jo Shults or Captain Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger.


After Uber's Fatal Crash, Self-Driving Cars Should Aim Lower

WIRED

More than a month after a self-driving Uber struck and killed a pedestrian crossing the street in Arizona, it's still not clear what sort of failure might explain the crash--or how to prevent it happening again. While the National Transportation Safety Board investigates, Uber's engineers are sitting on their hands, their cars are parked. The crash and its inconclusive aftermath reflect poorly on a newborn industry predicated on the idea that letting computers take the wheel can save lives, ease congestion, and make travel more pleasant. An industry dashing toward adulthood--Google sister company Waymo plans to launch a robo-taxi service this year, General Motors is aiming for 2019--and now, suddenly, on the verge of being rejected by a public that hasn't even experienced it yet. In other words, AV makers are clearing the technological hurdles and tripping over the psychological ones.


Smarter Cities and Safer Self-Driving Cars: Imagining Life in 5G

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

Today it takes about four minutes to download a movie on a 4G LTE network. With 5G, that same film could be on your tablet or phone in as little as six seconds. At those speeds--and with help from connected headsets--theme-park visitors could stream high-definition, virtual-reality experiences while on a speeding roller coaster. For self-driving cars to safely navigate the streets, they need to be able to communicate--with one another, with traffic signals and with passengers. Cars equipped with 5G-powered mapping will be able to see and react to their surroundings instantaneously.


Self-driving cars. Scooters. The future of commuting to work is here

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U.S. Transportation Secy.: Self-driving tech will make roads safer Innovation is underway to rethink one of the biggest headaches we face on a daily basis: getting to work. From crowdsourced shuttle buses to companies offering rides to lure top talent, here are concepts used in some cities that could one day help your morning commute. Some of the largest US companies, including Google, Apple and Facebook, offer shuttles or arranged ride shares to get employees to work. These shuttles often come with free WiFi, and pick up near employees' homes. "It's the dawn of private transportation systems operating under the radar," Ryan Croft, co-founder of TransitScreen, a startup providing real-time transit planning information, told CNN.


How We Can Train Artificial Intelligence Algorithms to Make Ethical Decisions Wednesday, @singularityu March 21st 2018 - 12:00 AM (CET)

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When faced with the choice of saving the life of the passenger or the pedestrian passing by, how should an autonomous car be programed to act? In many scenarios, the most logical decision isn't always the most ethical one, which is why objective decision-making alone in algorithms is not enough. As machine learning and advanced artificial intelligence algorithms become more prevalent in our daily lives, it becomes increasingly important to address the inherent biases and ethical blind spots built into these systems. In fact, when we don't, we risk unleashing systems that may have far-reaching and disastrous consequences across many areas of society, from medical diagnoses to judicial decisions. Join Nathana Sharma, as she talks about the importance of designing AI algorithms that are capable of making decisions that are not just rationally correct, but also ethically right.


Your Next Pilot Could Be Drone Software

International Business Times

Would you get on a plane that didn't have a human pilot in the cockpit? Half of air travelers surveyed in 2017 said they would not, even if the ticket was cheaper. Modern pilots do such a good job that almost any air accident is big news, such as the Southwest engine disintegration on April 17. But stories of pilot drunkenness, rants, fights and distraction, however rare, are reminders that pilots are only human. Not every plane can be flown by a disaster-averting pilot, like Southwest Capt.


Xiaomi, Aramco Will Likely List in Hong Kong, Exchange Chief Says

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The proposed changes include permitting IPOs that restrict shareholders' voting rights, secondary listings by Chinese and international companies already listed elsewhere and primary listings by unprofitable biotech firms. The reforms are set to become effective April 30. The exchange will begin taking listing applications in early May, Mr. Li said. "This probably is the largest reform we've ever had in the last 25 years," he said, adding that it's "only a matter of time" before the likes of Alibaba and Xiaomi list in Hong Kong. Mr. Li is one of several speakers who are discussing some of the most compelling ideas emerging globally.


Make Way for Machine Learning: How Seattle Is Becoming a Major Hub for Artificial Intelligence

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This article appears in print in the April 2018 issue. Artificial intelligence (AI) promises to revolutionize virtually every sector of the economy --from automobile manufacturing to health care delivery to building maintenance. And the Seattle region's prominent role in cloud computing -- a key driver in AI's widespread use -- means the technology is becoming as prominent here as damp shoes. Indisputably, AI has quietly and inexorably made its way into our daily lives. "We see it in a lot of the things that require speech recognition," says Oren Etzioni, CEO of the Paul Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence.


Japan to place accident liability on self-driving car owners

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Japan plans to hold owners responsible for accidents involving self-driving cars, like regular vehicles, easing liability concerns among automakers and likely accelerating commercialization efforts. The policy is part of the guidelines governing autonomous cars unveiled by the government's Council on Investments for the Future Friday. The plan is to submit related legislation to the Diet as early as 2019. "By taking concrete steps toward a legal framework, I would like Japan to take the lead in creating international rules," said Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at a council meeting. The guidelines are meant to set regulatory and legal direction before self-driving cars become widespread -- likely in the first half of the next decade.


Luminar's Lidar Enters Mass Production

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Luminar, a lidar startup founded by a 16-year-old, has come of age. Founder Austin Russell is now 23, and he tells IEEE Spectrum that his company has started mass production. "This year we will produce 5000 units per quarter, enough to equip every autonomous car unit on the road," he said, during a visit to our offices in Manhattan on Monday. "We had been using optics PhDs to hand-assemble them; by year's end one'll be coming off the line every 8 minutes." That's an achievement, and Russell has evidently kept the production milestone under his hat for a while.