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Google Billionaire Eric Schmidt Warns Of 'National Emergency' If China Overtakes U.S. In AI Tech

#artificialintelligence

Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt on Sunday urged lawmakers to ramp up funding for research and development in the artificial intelligence space in order to prevent China from becoming the biggest player in the global AI market–a development Schmidt warned would spark national security and privacy concerns that could ultimately constitute a national emergency. Speaking to CNN's Fareed Zakaria on Sunday, 65-year-old Schmidt said the United States may lose its lead in AI "fairly quickly" over the next decade given the Chinese government's progress on a 2017 plan to lead the global market for AI by 2030. A former Google CEO and current chair of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, Schmidt notes the U.S. is also falling behind China in additive, or 3D, manufacturing and robotics, as well as facial recognition technology and supercomputers–both of which pose risks on the national security front. "The government is not today prepared for this new technology," Schmidt said Sunday, noting that the use of AI to produce and spread harmful information poses a "threat to democracy" and could ultimately be used as a weapon of war. In order for the U.S. to be competitive, Schmidt suggests increasing the nation's budget for research and development in AI from $1.5 billion this year to $2 billion in 2022, and then doubling it each year until it hits $32 billion in 2026.


Panel on artificial intelligence urges US to boost tech skills amid China's rise

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An artificial intelligence commission led by former Google CEO Eric Schmidt is urging the U.S. to boost its AI skills to counter China, including by pursuing "AI-enabled" weapons – something that Google itself has shied away from on ethical grounds. Schmidt and current executives from Google, Microsoft, Oracle and Amazon are among the 15 members of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, which released its final report to Congress on Monday. "To win in AI we need more money, more talent, stronger leadership," Schmidt said Monday. The report says that machines that can "perceive, decide, and act more quickly" than humans and with more accuracy are going to be deployed for military purposes -- with or without the involvement of the U.S. and other democracies. It warns against unchecked use of autonomous weapons but expresses opposition to a global ban.


AI commission sees 'extraordinary' support to stand up tech-focused service academy

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Artificial intelligence tools will soon become the "weapons of first resort," and will accelerate the damage caused by cyber attacks and disinformation campaigns, former Deputy Defense Secretary Robert Work said Monday. To stay top of this emerging threat, Work, speaking as the vice-chairman of the National Security Commission on AI, is calling on the federal government to add senior AI advisors to the top ranks of the White House, Defense Department and intelligence community. The commission, in its final report to Congress and President Joe Biden, recommended standing up a Technology Competitiveness Council within the White House, modeled after the National Security Council, that would prepare for the threats and opportunities of AI. The report also recommended creating a Digital Service Academy, modeled after the five current military service academies, that would "grow tech talent with the same seriousness of purpose that we grow military officers," and train current and future federal employees. Insight by Kodak Alaris: Practitioners provide insight into how states and the IT industry are dealing with Real ID in this exclusive executive briefing.


China will dominate AI unless U.S. invests more, commission warns

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The U.S., which once had a dominant head start in artificial intelligence, now has just a few years' lead on China and risks being overtaken unless government steps in, according to a new report to Congress and the White House. Why it matters: Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, who chaired the committee that issued the report, tells Axios that the U.S. risks dire consequences if it fails to both invest in key technologies and fully integrate AI into the military. Driving the news: The National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence approved its 750-page report on Monday, following a 2-year effort. Schmidt chaired the 15-member commission, which also included Oracle's Safra Catz, Microsoft's Eric Horvitz and Amazon's Andy Jassy. "We don't have to go to war with China," Schmidt said.


Who leads the world on AI? A decade from now, it might not be the US

ZDNet

The US National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI) has released its final report on the current state of AI development in the US and the threats posed by China's rapidly developing AI capabilities. As the 750-page report notes, "China possesses the might, talent, and ambition to surpass the United States as the world's leader in AI in the next decade if current trends do not change." It argues that the AI race is about competing values. "China's domestic use of AI is a chilling precedent for anyone around the world who cherishes individual liberty. Its employment of AI as a tool of repression and surveillance – at home and, increasingly, abroad – is a powerful counterpoint to how we believe AI should be used," the report warns.


Artificial intelligence panel urges US to boost tech skills amid China's rise

Boston Herald

An artificial intelligence commission led by former Google CEO Eric Schmidt is urging the U.S. to boost its AI skills to counter China, including by pursuing "AI-enabled" weapons -- something that Google itself has shied away from on ethical grounds. Schmidt and current executives from Google, Microsoft, Oracle and Amazon are among the 15 members of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, which released its final report to Congress on Monday. "To win in AI we need more money, more talent, stronger leadership," Schmidt said Monday. The report says that machines that can "perceive, decide, and act more quickly" than humans and with more accuracy are going to be deployed for military purposes -- with or without the involvement of the U.S. and other democracies. It warns against unchecked use of autonomous weapons but expresses opposition to a global ban. It also calls for "wise restraints" on the use of AI tools such as facial recognition that can be used for mass surveillance.


War Mongering For Artificial Intelligence

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The ghost of Edward Teller must have been doing the rounds between members of the National Commission on Artificial Intelligence. The father of the hydrogen bomb was never one too bothered by the ethical niggles that came with inventing murderous technology. It was not, for instance, "the scientist's job to determine whether a hydrogen bomb should be constructed, whether it should be used, or how it should be used." Responsibility, however exercised, rested with the American people and their elected officials. The application of AI in military systems has plagued the ethicist but excited certain leaders and inventors. Russian President Vladimir Putin has grandiloquently asserted that "it would be impossible to secure the future of our civilization" without a mastery of artificial intelligence, genetics, unmanned weapons systems and hypersonic weapons.


How artificial intelligence can tackle climate change

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Climate change is the biggest challenge facing the planet. It will need every solution possible, including technology like artificial intelligence (AI). Seeing a chance to help the cause, some of the biggest names in AI and machine learning--a discipline within the field--recently published a paper called "Tackling Climate Change with Machine Learning." The paper, which was discussed at a workshop during a major AI conference in June, was a "call to arms" to bring researchers together, said David Rolnick, a University of Pennsylvania postdoctoral fellow and one of the authors. "It's surprising how many problems machine learning can meaningfully contribute to," says Rolnick, who also helped organize the June workshop. The paper offers up 13 areas where machine learning can be deployed, including energy production, CO2 removal, education, solar geoengineering, and finance.


Technology helped industries formulate strategy, adapt to changing future

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Addressing the FICCI's 93rd Annual General Meeting on a fireside chat, industry leaders such as Satya Nadella, Chief Executive Officer, Microsoft, Dr Eric Schmidt, ex-Chairman Alphabet and Chairman of National Security Commission on AI (NSCAI), Nivruti Rai, Country Head, Intel India & Vice President, DPG, Intel Technology India Pvt Ltd. amongst others highlighted the role of technological developments and trends in the artificial intelligence (AI) space and how businesses can utilise AI in the new normal. In conversation with FICCI President Dr Sangita Reddy, Nadella said, "Despite the constraint caused by the pandemic, digital technology is being adopted at scale for core resilience, not only for future transformation but for business continuity, which is the biggest structural change globally. The ability to use digital tools and our built-in infrastructure and capability around the digital track is going to create resilience and transformation." Right from manufacturing, health, education, government, and service sectors, artificial intelligence and digital technology are being accelerated in every sector since COVID-19 outbreak. Amidst all this, data analytics, speech recognition and machine learning have helped industries formulate strategy and adapt to a changing future.


Ex-Google chief: U.S. must do 'whatever it takes' to beat China on AI

#artificialintelligence

Key context: Schmidt has previously warned about the encroaching command of China in the AI sphere, particularly with its military buildup and "high tech authoritarianism." To counter the threat, Schmidt said Thursday that the U.S. should invest more in research, ethics and AI infrastructure and partner with countries such as Canada, the United Kingdom, Israel and Japan. He said broad consensus exists in the West on AI ethics, but those would probably contrast with standards developed in China. Having the United States and its partners lead the charge on ethical standards will be crucial in ensuring they reflect "human values," Schmidt said. "China is simply too big," he said.