Goto

Collaborating Authors

sapien


Is Robot Empathy a Trap?

#artificialintelligence

And why should we care if they do? SAPIENS host Jen Shannon meets Pepper the robot, and host Chip Colwell goes on a quest to find out how the robotics industry is (re)shaping intimacy in Japan. He speaks with anthropologists Jennifer Robertson, Daniel White, and Hirofumi Katsuno, all researchers who investigate the field of robotics, to learn more about what artificial emotion can teach us about what it means to be human. Our theme song and music for this episode are by Matthew Simonson. Special thanks to composer Scott Ampleford for use of the original score from 2026: Musik Inspired by Metropolis, which was featured in this episode.


How Yuval Noah Harari Removed the History of Western Philosophy From his Transhumanist Propaganda Tale

#artificialintelligence

The Israelian historian Yuval Noah Harari has achieved international fame for having written a history of Homo Sapiens (humankind), a prophetic prediction of its end, and the beginning of new species called Homo Deus: an immortal cyborg with divine powers. The book that started it all is called: Sapiens – A Brief History of Humankind. In her article, Yuval Noah Harari: The age of the cyborg has begun – and the consequences cannot be known, Carole Cadwalladr asks Harari: In some ways, I say, it struck me that Sapiens isn't actually a history book – it's a philosophy book that asks the big, philosophical questions and attempts to answer them through history. I think that I see history as a philosophy laboratory. Philosophers come up with all these very interesting questions about the human condition, but the way that most of them – though not all – go about answering them is through thought experiments. When I discovered Harari, I came to think about Stephen Hawking s book: A Brief History of Time. In the book Hawking seems to want to surpass Nietzsche s declaration: God is Dead! In the introduction he presents a variety of philosophical questions, whereafter he says: Traditionally these are questions for philosophy; but philosophy is dead.


AI in Five, Fifty and Five Hundred Years -- Part Three -- Five Hundred Years

#artificialintelligence

Always in motion is the future." We've spread out towards the stars and colonized the solar system, from settlements orbiting the glittering rings of Saturn, to sprawling cities on the red hills of Mars built by nano insects invisible to the eyes. When their big bellies are filled to bursting, they rocket along invisible superhighways, delivering He3 to energy hungry fusion micro-reactors that power the interplanetary economy. Beyond the rings, deep space mining ships release clouds of drones like baby spiders into the wind and they digest asteroids hurtling in the endless void. The drones fuel an unprecedented building boom on nearly every planet circling the sun, as city after city goes up on barren rocks long hostile to organic life. The fastest transformations are taking place on Mars. The people who immigrated to Mars generations ago don't need oxygen at all. They're genengineered to breathe the carbon dioxide saturated sky, though their lungs can switch back and forth between oxygen and CO2 as easily as flipping a light switch.


Insurtech roundup: Talanx; Zesty.ai; Munich Re; Sapiens; Bank of England

#artificialintelligence

Who's involved: German re/insurer Talanx and US-headquartered automation software provider, WorkFusion. What's happening: Talanx and WorkFusion have agreed a strategic partnership. In an initial step, the software from WorkFusion is being used for automated checking and processing in the claims division at Talanx's subsidiary HDI. The software will initially be used for invoices dealing with glass breakage and motor insurance. Significance of development: Talanx has described the new software as "automation 4.0" because the artificial intelligence platform can take end-to-end decisions, known as Intelligent Process Automation.


What Is The Best Book On Artificial Intelligence (AI)?

#artificialintelligence

AI is rapidly changing the way we live and do business, which leaves many business leaders feeling like they're struggling to keep pace with developments. As such, business leaders often ask me for tips on recommend reading – they want to know which books will help them understand the AI revolution, grasp its impact on our world and plan for an AI-driven future. What Is The Best Book On Artificial Intelligence (AI)? I read a lot about AI, for my consulting work, and more recently as research for my latest book'Artificial Intelligence in Practice' and, of course, because I find the subject absolutely fascinating. In fact, I'd say I've devoured pretty much every key AI book that's been published in the last decade.


AI in Five, Fifty and Five Hundred Years -- Part Three -- Five Hundred Years

#artificialintelligence

Check out part one and two of this series for the first five and fifty years in AI. In part three we push the very limits of reality and look 500 years into the swirling depths of tomorrow. We've spread out towards the stars and colonized the solar system, from settlements orbiting the glittering rings of Saturn, to sprawling cities on the red hills of Mars built by nano insects invisible to the eyes. When their big bellies are filled to bursting, they rocket along invisible superhighways, delivering He3 to energy hungry fusion micro-reactors that power the interplanetary economy. Beyond the rings, deep space mining ships release clouds of drones like baby spiders into the wind and they digest asteroids hurtling in the endless void. The drones fuel an unprecedented building boom on nearly every planet circling the sun, as city after city goes up on barren rocks long hostile to organic life.


What Is The Best Book On Artificial Intelligence (AI)?

#artificialintelligence

AI is rapidly changing the way we live and do business, which leaves many business leaders feeling like they're struggling to keep pace with developments. As such, business leaders often ask me for tips on recommend reading – they want to know which books will help them understand the AI revolution, grasp its impact on our world and plan for an AI-driven future. What Is The Best Book On Artificial Intelligence (AI)?Adobe Stock I read a lot about AI, for my consulting work, and more recently as research for my latest book'Artificial Intelligence in Practice' and, of course, because I find the subject absolutely fascinating. In fact, I'd say I've devoured pretty much every key AI book that's been published in the last decade. My plan for this article was to nominate the single best book on AI – as in, if you could only read one, which book should it be?


How Data Is Domesticating Humanity? – Future Monger

#artificialintelligence

Says in his book "Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind" When you think of big data, the same danger is lurking around. We think that we own the data but soon we will realize that data is owning us. Whatever we do, say and like; it is all data, continuously measured and used for many purposes. News you read, search history of all your devices, calendars, pictures, email, music -- all these combined are profiling you. Machine learning personality assessments are now more accurate than: -- co-worker after 10 likes, -- friend or co-habitant after 150 likes, -- spouse after 300 likes.


It's not just about creating jobs, but ones we can beat algorithms at

#artificialintelligence

Like all good economists, John Maynard Keynes was better at predicting the past than the future. Writing in Economic Possibilities for Our Grandchildren in 1930, Keynes said that in 100 years' time, people would work no more than 15 hours a week. With many people still clocking up 40 hours or more, that prediction was somewhat wide of the mark.


Our duty to connect technology and humanity – Rohan Rajiv – Medium

#artificialintelligence

"Man," here, stands for the collective human race. But, why not use the latin word for "Wise woman" or "Wise person?" There was a movement in the tech world a few years ago to use female pronouns more often. Here's another question -- why do we call a list of bad things a "blacklist?" And, why is the opposite a "whitelist?" Why does white represent good and black represent bad?