safety


Japan eager to get on board with vertical-takeoff 'flying cars'

The Japan Times

Electric drones booked through smartphones pick people up from office rooftops, shortening travel time by hours, reducing the need for parking and clearing smog from the air. This vision of the future is driving the government's "flying car" project. Major carrier All Nippon Airways, electronics company NEC Corp. and more than a dozen other companies and academic experts hope to have a road map for the plan ready by the year's end. "This is such a totally new sector Japan has a good chance for not falling behind," said Fumiaki Ebihara, the government official in charge of the project. For now, nobody believes people are going to be zipping around in flying cars any time soon.


Should We Be Worried About Cybernetic Mental Illness?

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Killer robots -- they're coming to get us! At least that's what the majority of otherwise credible news sources would have us believe when tackling the very serious concerns around AI safety, as well as the increasingly clichéd use of photos of Terminator robots in such articles. It's a pet peeve expressed by renowned AI researcher Eliezer Yudkowsky in a recent appearance on Sam Harris' podcast, and a reference that betrays a deep misunderstanding of the ways in which our civilization's future survival likely depends on ensuring the safe development of future artificial intelligence. For one thing, you'd think we'd be over "robots". As was graphically illustrated by the apparent Russian meddling in the 2016 US presidential election, nefarious artificial intelligence is not some far-off thing -- it's already here and running wild throughout the World Wide Web in the form of bots.


Workers believe AI will kill 40% of all jobs within 10 years

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Many industry experts have made predictions about the future of artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, and automation in the workplace--but little research exists on how skilled and unskilled employees view the coming technology disruptions. Gartner surveyed more than 2,700 employees in the US and the UK across multiple industries and skill levels, including unskilled workers, skilled manual workers, clerical workers, and professionals, to determine how different groups view AI in the workplace. The majority of employees (52%) said they would prefer AI to be deployed as an on-demand helper--essentially, acting as their own employee--rather than as their manager (9%), coworker (11%), or proactive assistant (32%), the report found. In this role, AI could help by limiting their routine work tasks, as well as reducing mistakes, respondents said. SEE: IT leader's guide to the future of artificial intelligence (Tech Pro Research) Workers differ significantly in their opinions about how AI will impact jobs, the report found.


Workers believe AI will kill 40% of all jobs within 10 years

#artificialintelligence

Many industry experts have made predictions about the future of artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, and automation in the workplace--but little research exists on how skilled and unskilled employees view the coming technology disruptions. Gartner surveyed more than 2,700 employees in the US and the UK across multiple industries and skill levels, including unskilled workers, skilled manual workers, clerical workers, and professionals, to determine how different groups view AI in the workplace. The majority of employees (52%) said they would prefer AI to be deployed as an on-demand helper--essentially, acting as their own employee--rather than as their manager (9%), coworker (11%), or proactive assistant (32%), the report found. In this role, AI could help by limiting their routine work tasks, as well as reducing mistakes, respondents said. SEE: IT leader's guide to the future of artificial intelligence (Tech Pro Research) Workers differ significantly in their opinions about how AI will impact jobs, the report found.


momio

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Although most of the children'play nice', some try to push their boundaries by posting inappropriate images. Given the young age of the users, it is crucial that photographs containing adult, harmful, scary stuff or spam are excluded from the community. Momio already had a number of successful safety measures in place, enforced by their team of Community Managers. However, policing a platform that hosts such a large volume of user-generated content is no simple feat. In 2017, almost 1 billion messages were sent and 30 million images were posted on Momio.


The Future of Work: 3 things that will change the way we work forever - O2 Business Blog

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As Head of Digital Innovation at O2, I get to see examples of technology changing the way we live and work on an almost daily basis. Last month I was asked to speak at a conference about the future of work. I think that there are three key developments whose impact will be such that they will change the way we work forever. According to research analysts Gartner, there will be 20 billion internet-connected, dedicated-function devices by 2020. These IoT devices will range from simple, connected household appliances through to the most advanced jet engines.


Self-Driving Car Developers Should Put Pedestrians First

WIRED

Since March, when an autonomous vehicle killed a pedestrian in Arizona, forecasts for AVs have been decidedly less optimistic. But autonomous vehicle promoters are undeterred. AI entrepreneur Andrew Ng contends that self-driving cars will be safe for pedestrians when walkers and cyclists conform to their limitations. "What we tell people is, 'Please be lawful and please be considerate,'" he told Bloomberg. Peter Norton is an associate professor in the Department of Engineering and Society at the University of Virginia.


How Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Your Health and Productivity

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An unhealthy, dangerous or otherwise toxic workspace is known to deter workers from innovation and damage a company's reputation. Entrepreneurs have a responsibility to ensure that working environments keep employees safe, satisfied and positive so they can remain productive and innovative on the job. With the focus on workplace health management programs, along with the emergence of AI technologies, it's crucial to understand how these disruptive tools will affect the health -- mental, social and physical -- of workers across various sectors. AI is promising to change the way workplaces operate, but will it be a force for good or disrupt workplace culture in negative ways? With the expectation that AI will create a $190.6 billion market by 2025, it could be a tool used to provide healthier, more productive, and accessible work environments for all employees.


Elon Musk said a Tesla could drive itself across the country by 2018. One just crashed backing out of a garage.

Washington Post

When Mangesh Gururaj's wife left home to pick up their child from math lessons one Sunday earlier this month, she turned on her Tesla Model S and hit "Summon," a self-parking feature that the electric automaker has promoted as a central step toward driverless cars. But as the family's $65,000 sedan reversed itself out of the garage, Gururaj said, the car abruptly struck the garage's side wall, ripping its front end off with a loud crack. The maimed Tesla looked as if it would have kept driving, Gururaj said, if his wife hadn't hit the brakes. No one was hurt, but Gururaj was rattled: The car had failed disastrously, during the simplest of maneuvers, using one of the most basic features from the self-driving technology he and his family had trusted many times at higher speeds. "This is just a crash in the garage.


From Check-In to Arrival – Your Flight Companion May Just Be AI

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With ever more passengers flying around the world, whether for business or pleasure, surely AI will be contributing in some way? After all, $125.2 billion was spent on U.S. commercial airline tickets in 2016, and the industry represents around 2.6% of U.S. gross domestic product (GDP). Unfortunately, airlines and the aircraft manufacturers are quite risk averse. This means they prioritize maintaining the high level of safety we have come to expect over implementing new technologies. Despite this, AI is starting to make inroads into air travel, from the airline operators to the aerospace industry that builds, delivers and services the aircraft.