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Scientists have built the world's first living, self-healing robots

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Scientists have created the world's first living, self-healing robots using stem cells from frogs. Named xenobots after the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) from which they take their stem cells, the machines are less than a millimeter (0.04 inches) wide -- small enough to travel inside human bodies. They can walk and swim, survive for weeks without food, and work together in groups. These are "entirely new life-forms," said the University of Vermont, which conducted the research with Tufts University's Allen Discovery Center. Stem cells are unspecialized cells that have the ability to develop into different cell types.


These "xenobots" are living machines designed by an evolutionary algorithm

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Meet the xenobots: Tiny living robots have been created using cells taken from frog embryos. Each so-called xenobot is less than a millimeter across, but one can propel itself through water using two stumpy limbs, while another has a kind of pouch that it could use to carry a small load. The early research, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could help the development of useful soft robots that can heal themselves when damaged. Because they are made of living tissue, they also decay once they stop working. The researchers, from Tufts University, the University of Vermont, and the Wyss Institute at Harvard, hope such living robots could one day be used to clean up microplastics, digest toxic materials, or even deliver drugs inside our bodies (although this is obviously still all a long way off).


Top 4 Artificial Intelligence Trends to Keep an Eye on in 2020 erpinnews

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New technology innovations are the thing that makes the world turn for the best. There are constant technological improvements in every field and AI is a big part of this movement. Even though the story of AI started almost a decade ago, it seems like now is the time to use its full potential. You might wonder why it took us 10 years to get used to the new technology, and there is a good reason for that. Data is essential in order to use artificial intelligence, and gathering data takes time.


CES 2020: A smart city oasis

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Like the city that hosts the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) there is a lot of noise on the show floor. Sifting through the lights, sounds and people can be an arduous task even for the most experienced CES attendees. Hidden past the North Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center (LVCC) is a walkway to a tech oasis housed in the Westgate Hotel. This new area hosting SmartCity/IoT innovations is reminiscent of the old Eureka Park complete with folding tables and ballroom carpeting. The fact that such enterprises require their own area separate from the main halls of the LVCC and the startup pavilions of the Sands Hotel is an indication of how urbanization is being redefined by artificial intelligence.


Top Quotes about AI, Automation and Robotics - Supply Chain Today

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"Artificial intelligence is growing up fast, as are robots whose facial expressions can elicit empathy and make your mirror neurons quiver." "In the long term, artificial intelligence and automation are going to be taking over so much of what gives humans a feeling of purpose." "I predict that, because of artificial intelligence and its ability to automate certain tasks that in the past were impossible to automate, not only will we have a much wealthier civilization, but the quality of work will go up very significantly and a higher fraction of people will have callings and careers relative to today." "Let's start with the three fundamental Rules of Robotics…. We have: one, a robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. Two, a robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. And three, a robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws." "In 30 years, a robot will likely be on the cover of time magazine as the best CEO. Machines will do what human beings are incapable of doing. Machines will partner and cooperate with humans, rather than become mankind's biggest enemy."


Top Quotes about AI, Automation and Robotics - Supply Chain Today

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"Artificial intelligence is growing up fast, as are robots whose facial expressions can elicit empathy and make your mirror neurons quiver." "In the long term, artificial intelligence and automation are going to be taking over so much of what gives humans a feeling of purpose." "I predict that, because of artificial intelligence and its ability to automate certain tasks that in the past were impossible to automate, not only will we have a much wealthier civilization, but the quality of work will go up very significantly and a higher fraction of people will have callings and careers relative to today." "Let's start with the three fundamental Rules of Robotics…. We have: one, a robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. Two, a robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. And three, a robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws." "In 30 years, a robot will likely be on the cover of time magazine as the best CEO. Machines will do what human beings are incapable of doing. Machines will partner and cooperate with humans, rather than become mankind's biggest enemy."


How Artificial Intelligence is Improving Assistive Technology - The Tech Edvocate

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The advances in technology could mean more for society than just new educational technology and virtual reality video games. People with disabilities are finding innovative ways to put artificial intelligence to work with their current conditions. As the science improves, assistive technology will continue producing new and improved platforms to help create a better standard of living for those individuals. Are you interested in the myriad of ways that assistive technology is changing with the improved status of artificial intelligence? These four examples should give you a great idea of what's possible when you integrate these two fields.


Facebook has trained an AI to navigate without needing a map

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The algorithm lets robots find the shortest route in unfamiliar environments, opening the door to robots that can work inside homes and offices. The news: A team at Facebook AI has created a reinforcement learning algorithm that lets a robot find its way in an unfamiliar environment without using a map. Using just a depth-sensing camera, GPS, and compass data, the algorithm gets a robot to its goal 99.9% of the time along a route that is very close to the shortest possible path, which means no wrong turns, no backtracking, and no exploration. This is a big improvement over previous best efforts. Why it matters: Mapless route-finding is essential for next-gen robots like autonomous delivery drones or robots that work inside homes and offices.


Yamaha's robot can ride a motorcycle today. Eventually it might be your chauffeur.

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We count on machines for our anti-lock brakes, cruise control and more. Tesla's autopilot and Google's self-driving pod are even stronger examples. But Yamaha has taken a distinct approach, building a human-like robot that sits on a motorcycle and rides it.


Facebook AI gives maps the brushoff in helping robots find the way

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Facebook has scored an impressive feat involving AI that can navigate without any map. Facebook's wish for bragging rights, although they said they have a way to go, were evident in its blog post, "Near-perfect point-goal navigation from 2.5 billion frames of experience." Long story short, Facebook has delivered an algorithm that, quoting MIT Technology Review, lets robots find the shortest route in unfamiliar environments, opening the door to robots that can work inside homes and offices." And, in line with the plain-and-simple, Ubergizmo's Tyler Lee also remarked: "Facebook believes that with this new algorithm, it will be capable of creating robots that can navigate an area without the need for maps...in theory, you could place a robot in a room or an area without a map and it should be able to find its way to its destination." Erik Wijmans and Abhishek Kadian in the Facebook Jan. 21 post said that, well, after all, one of the technology key challenges is "teaching these systems to navigate through complex, unfamiliar real-world environments to reach a specified destination--without a preprovided map." Facebook has taken on the challenge. The two announced that Facebook AI created a large-scale distributed reinforcement learning algorithm called DD-PPO, "which has effectively solved the task of point-goal navigation using only an RGB-D camera, GPS, and compass data," they wrote. DD-PPO stands for decentralized distributed proximal policy optimization. This is what Facebook is using to train agents and results seen in virtual environments such as houses and office buildings were encouraging. The bloggers pointed out that "even failing 1 out of 100 times is not acceptable in the physical world, where a robot agent might damage itself or its surroundings by making an error." Beyond DD-PPO, the authors gave credit to Facebook AI's open source AI Habitat platform for its "state-of-the-art speed and fidelity." AI Habitat made its open source announcement last year as a simulation platform to train embodied agents such as virtual robots in photo-realistic 3-D environments. Facebook said it was part of "Facebook AI's ongoing effort to create systems that are less reliant on large annotated data sets used for supervised training." InfoQ had said in July that "The technology was taking a different approach than relying upon static data sets which other researchers have traditionally used and that Facebook decided to open-source this technology to move this subfield forward." Jon Fingas in Engadget looked at how the team worked toward AI navigation (and this is where that 25 billion number comes in). "Previous projects tend to struggle without massive computational power.