rights


Managing the ethical complexities of the age of big data

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Governments have defined almost every conceivable aspect of property ownership. Can I cut down my neighbors' tree if it grows over my patio? Only those limbs that grow over the property line. Can I play music on my porch? Only if it doesn't interfere with your neighbor's enjoyment of their property.


Populism, Technology and Law

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Places at the workshop are limited, please, contact us if you are interested in attending the event. Within the framework of the CEU ITI Comparative Populism Project this one-day workshop brings together CEU faculty and international scholars working on topics related to populism, technology, law, and governance within different disciplinary traditions. The aim is to explore the technological challenges to the rule of law, and to analyze the contribution of various emerging technologies to the increasing manifestation of populism. In order to arrive at more generalizable conclusions about the function of populism in public policy, party politics, public administration, the law, and foreign policy, this workshop focuses on the role of technology and governance. The workshop seeks to answer two pressing questions: What is the relationship between populist politics and new digital technologies, like artificial intelligence and machine learning?


Air Force plans to stay ahead of HAL 9000 and prepare itself for AI use in new strategy Federal News Network

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As the Defense Department continues to embrace artificial intelligence and even plans to possibly use it in operations as soon as next year, the Air Force is solidifying its focus on the technology by releasing a new strategy that addresses the use, ethics and workforce needs of AI in the service. The strategy, released Thursday, identifies AI as crucial to fielding a future Air Force, executing multi-domain operations and confronting threats before they reach the level of actual combat. Signed by acting Air Force Secretary Matt Donovan and Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein, the document hones in on five focus areas that the service thinks will properly develop AI for the service's needs. One focus area identifies data as a strategic asset, given that AI will need mass amounts of data that standardized for use by AI algorithms. "We will review our corporate processes and reform underlying critical aspects of agility principled on government-purpose data rights to ensure we are consistently generating training quality data for algorithmic development," the strategy states.


Your Software Could Have More Rights Than You

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If AI gains legal personhood via the corporate loophole, laws granting equal rights to artificially intelligent agents may result, as a matter of equal treatment. That would lead to a number of indignities for the human population. Because software can reproduce itself almost indefinitely, if given civil rights, it would quickly make human suffrage inconsequential 14 leading to the loss of self-determination for human beings. Such loss of power would likely lead to the redistribution of resources from humanity to machines as well as the possibility of AIs serving as leaders, presidents, judges, jurors, and even executioners. We might see military AIs targeting human populations and deciding on their own targets and acceptable collateral damage.


Who owns AI's ideas? Disputing intellectual property rights

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In 2016 The Washington Post unleashed a new reporter on the world, an artificial intelligence (AI) system called Heliograf. In its first year, it churned out 300 short reports on the Rio Olympics, followed by 500 brief articles about the presidential election, which clocked up pretty good engagement online. Meanwhile, pharmaceutical companies are increasingly turning to AI to drastically speed up the process of discovering new drugs, analysing huge quantities of data to come up with new molecules that could potentially have a therapeutic effect. It's moves like these that have led some to suggest that, one day at least, AIs might be deemed owners of copyright or other intellectual property (IP). However, according to most legal and technology experts, this scenario is a long way off.


Artificial Intelligence use should keep humans in focus - MITLA

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The Malta Information Technology Law Association (MITLA) has appealed to the government not to cede control of information to Artificial Intelligence (AI) and to ensure that information remains driven by humans. In a reaction document to Government's call for public consultation on an ethical framework for AI, MITLA recommended that the human-centric element be kept strongly in focus. To this end, MITLA proposed that human-operated'kill-switches' are introduced to over-ride AI "…malfunctioning or worse, of AI systems". MITLA made a strong recommendation to Government not to grant distinct legal personality to AI systems, so as not to undermine the fundamental principle of human-centric AI, which should respect fundamental human rights. MITLA also said that to ensure that the process of creating an ethical AI framework is coherent, digital rights should first be introduced into the Maltese Constitution.


Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Empower YouTube, the #1 Video Sharing Platform

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According to statistics, over 1.9 billion users log into YouTube every single month watching more than a billion hours of video daily, which is half the internet. Organizations are integrating video creation and video sharing with their marketing strategies. As on date, YouTube supports 80 different languages, which also adds to its popularity. Cisco predicts that by 2022, video will consume 82 percent of all internet traffic. Considering the massive number of users, high volume of activities and richness of content, it makes sense for YouTube to take advantage of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) to add efficiency to its operations.


UK privacy activist to appeal after facial recognition case fails UK News

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British privacy activist Ed Bridges is set to appeal a landmark ruling that endorses the "sinister" use of facial recognition technology by the police to hunt for suspects. In what is believed to be the world's first case of its kind, Bridges told the High Court in Wales that the local police breached his rights by scanning his face without consent. "This sinister technology undermines our privacy and I will continue to fight against its unlawful use to ensure our rights are protected and we are free from disproportionate government surveillance," Bridges said in a statement. But judges said the police's use of facial recognition technology was lawful and legally justified. Civil rights group Liberty, which represented 36-year-old Bridges, said it would appeal the "disappointing" decision, while police chiefs said they understood the fears of the public.


Police Use of Facial Recognition Is Accepted by British Court

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In one of the first lawsuits to address the use of live facial recognition technology by governments, a British court ruled on Wednesday that police use of the systems is acceptable and does not violate privacy and human rights. The case has been closely watched by law enforcement agencies, privacy groups and government officials because there is little legal precedent concerning the use of cameras in public spaces that scan people's faces in real time and attempt to identify them from photo databases of criminal suspects. While the technology has advanced quickly, with many companies building systems that can be used by police departments, laws and regulations have been slower to develop. The High Court dismissed the case brought by Ed Bridges, a resident of Cardiff, Wales, who said his rights were violated by the use of facial recognition by the South Wales Police. Mr. Bridges claimed that he had been recorded without permission on at least two occasions -- once while shopping and again while attending a political rally.


Religion that worships artificial intelligence prepares for a world run by machines

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A newly established religion called Way of the Future will worship artificial intelligence, focusing on "the realization, acceptance, and worship of a Godhead based on Artificial Intelligence" that followers believe will eventually surpass human control over Earth. The first AI-based church was founded by Anthony Levandowski, the Silicon Valley multimillionaire who championed the robotics team for Uber's self-driving program and Waymo, the self-driving car company owned by Google. Way of the Future "is about creating a peaceful and respectful transition of who is in charge of the planet from people to people'machines,'" the religion's official website reads. "Given that technology will'relatively soon' be able to surpass human abilities, we want to help educate people about this exciting future and prepare a smooth transition." Levandowski filed documents to establish the religion back in May, making himself the "Dean" of the church and the CEO of a related nonprofit that would run it.