regulation


Gaining Control Over AI, Machine Learning

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As artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies make their way into advanced data management platforms, the emphasis for developers and data scientists is broadening to include not just deployment but "control" of the data accessed by these automation tools. To gain control of algorithm-driven business models, the company argues: "Organizations require greater control over the data being used by machine learning and AI models." Immuta's data management platform is designed to provide greater control of the data fed into algorithms, speeding deployment as well as increasing visibility into how automation tools are functioning. Among the tasks burdening data scientists are compliance with complex data security regulations and information governance policies such as rules for accessing personal data.


China's Baidu to Invest $1.5 Billion in Autonomous Driving

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Chinese search engine Baidu (bidu) announced a 10 billion yuan ($1.52 billion) autonomous driving fund on Thursday as part of a wider plan to speed up its technical development and compete with U.S. rivals. The "Apollo Fund" will invest in 100 autonomous driving projects over the next three years, Baidu said in a statement. After years of internal development, Baidu in April decided to open its autonomous driving technology to third parties, a move it hopes will accelerate development and help it compete with U.S. firms Tesla (tsla) and Google (googl) project Waymo. Baidu's Apollo project - named after the NASA moon landing - aims to create technology for completely autonomous cars, which it says will be ready for city roads in China by 2020.


Chinese internet search engine Baidu sets up $1.5bn self driving car fund

The Independent

Chinese search engine Baidu announced a 10bn yuan ($1.1bn) self-driving car fund on Thursday as part of a wider plan to speed up its technical development and compete with US rivals. The "Apollo Fund" will invest in 100 autonomous driving projects over the next three years, Baidu said in a statement. After years of internal development, Baidu in April decided to open its autonomous driving technology to third parties; a move it hopes will accelerate development and help it compete with US firms Tesla and Google project Waymo. Baidu's Apollo project - named after the NASA moon landing - aims to create technology for completely autonomous cars, which it says will be ready for city roads in China by 2020.


Treat drones as 'flying mobile phones': Telstra CTO

ZDNet

Telstra CTO Håkan Eriksson has come up with a resolution to all concerns raised over the regulation and control of drones: To treat them as flying mobile phones, and to allow Telstra to provide the necessary connectivity in a "drone-control-as-a-service" offering. Concerns about drones getting in the way of aircraft would also be addressed via the use of mobile networks, Eriksson told ZDNet, because coverage only extends to around 150m above ground level. While drones could run off existing 4G and future 5G mobile spectrum, Eriksson told ZDNet it would also be possible to allocate special spectrum where drones need priority in certain cases, or to ensure the network doesn't get overloaded. Eriksson said Telstra is also currently working on three augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) projects: Project Halo, which uses AR to show maintenance staff, for example, a red line to where exactly a faulty rack is located within a datacentre; Project Pokemon, which uses AR to show customers how to install their new Telstra TV or router at home; and Project Smart Miner, which uses VR headsets to provide a safer training environment for mining without needing to send novices underground.


Workflow headaches, patient fears and lack of regulation among barriers to artificial intelligence in healthcare

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RELATED: Plenty of buzz for AI in healthcare, but are any systems actually using it? Other concerns include that AI could make already-existing healthcare disparities worse, as the poorest patients would have limited access to the technology. For it to truly succeed, the industry must solve its "data problem," which includes reaching these underserved populations to gather more information on them. Data collection and interoperability are significant shortcomings for one of the most high-profile AI technologies, IBM Watson.


Should AI be regulated? – Martin Dinov – Medium

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This topic of AI regulation is complex and multi-faceted, involving many (all?) Most of the rest of the technological and scientific world has a variety of monitoring systems and regulatory systems in place. And of course, we have strong regulations on the use and distribution of nuclear materials. Nuclear material control (non-proliferation of nuclear material) is very difficult (to wit: the situation in North Korea we have today, but there are other examples) but few would argue to not have such controls on the use and distribution of nuclear material.


Lifeboats in Norfolk trialling DRONES in search and rescue

Daily Mail

This gives the lifeboat crew a better view of the water, and helps them find a person more quickly - potentially the difference between life and death. The drones use Direct Line's Fleetlights prototype technology, developed in 2016 in a bid to solve a lack of street lighting. The drones use Direct Line's Fleetlights prototype technology, developed in 2016 in a bid to solve a lack of street lighting. CAA regulations cap the maximum legal range of a drone at 500m, but drone expert, Peter King, said he hoped to put forward a'safety case' for permission for the lifeboat drones to go further'Perhaps if we had been equipped with the drone technology, these searches would have had a positive outcome.


AI Research Is in Desperate Need of an Ethical Watchdog

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Stanford's review board approved Kosinski and Wang's study. "The vast, vast, vast majority of what we call'big data' research does not fall under the purview of federal regulations," says Metcalf. Take a recent example: Last month, researchers affiliated with Stony Brook University and several major internet companies released a free app, a machine learning algorithm that guesses ethnicity and nationality from a name to about 80 percent accuracy. The group also went through an ethics review at the company that provided training list of names, although Metcalf says that an evaluation at a private company is the "weakest level of review that they could do."


ai-research-is-in-desperate-need-of-an-ethical-watchdog

WIRED

Stanford's review board approved Kosinski and Wang's study. "The vast, vast, vast majority of what we call'big data' research does not fall under the purview of federal regulations," says Metcalf. Take a recent example: Last month, researchers affiliated with Stony Brook University and several major internet companies released a free app, a machine learning algorithm that guesses ethnicity and nationality from a name to about 80 percent accuracy. The group also went through an ethics review at the company that provided training list of names, although Metcalf says that an evaluation at a private company is the "weakest level of review that they could do."


Who is in control of AI? Orange Business Services

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There are increasing calls for government oversight of artificial intelligence development. AI is undoubtedly set to offer solutions that will do much to change our lives for the better and grow economies, but how important is it that we have a so called "human in command" approach to AI? These include ethics, safety, transparency, labor, privacy and standards, education, access, laws and regulations, governance, democracy, warfare and "superintelligence". From whichever angle you look, the general consensus seems to be that AI will have an enormous impact on our lives and it is a technology governments, industries and society need to be fully prepared for.