professor


Bennett University, IEEE hold global meet on machine learning and data science

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NEW DELHI: Bennett University"s computer science and engineering (CSE) department held its first international conference on machine learning and data science at its Greater Noida campus that saw researchers and academicians deliberating on the new wave of technologies and their impact on the world of big data, machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI). The two-day conference was organised by the department in association with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Computer Society. Bennett University has been set up by the Times Group, which publishes ET. "We are pleased to be in India to establish a relationship with all the major universities including Bennett University, so that we can develop and nurture the relationship such that India becomes a very important player in the computer society," said Roger Fujii, 2016 president of the society. The event saw attendance from 50 organisations including IBM, Nvidia, Tata Consultancy Services, Wipro, Accenture, Dell and Infosys, among others. Also attending were about 400 participants representing premier institutions such as the Indian Institutes of Technology, National Institutes of Technology, Indian Institutes of Management, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi Technological University, University of Delhi, Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology and Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur.


Preventing an Artificial-Intelligence Fueled Dystopia, One Student at a Time

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AI is coming for your job. AI is taking over the world. If we compiled all the headlines about artificial intelligence from the last year, we'd have a picture of a dystopian world where jobs are scarce and AI and automation rule everything we do. In this scenario, millions of people are impacted by AI and autonomous systems created with little regard for their consequences: They are deployed in unethical ways, riddled with errors and bias, and discriminatory. The obscurity of how AI works and where it's used result in fear and confusion.


The Trouble with Bias - NIPS 2017 Keynote - Kate Crawford #NIPS2017

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Kate Crawford is a leading researcher, academic and author who has spent the last decade studying the social implications of data systems, machine learning and artificial intelligence. She is a Distinguished Research Professor at New York University, a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research New York, and a Visiting Professor at the MIT Media Lab.


Will Artificial Intelligence Become Conscious?

International Business Times

Forget about today's modest incremental advances in artificial intelligence, such as the increasing abilities of cars to drive themselves. Waiting in the wings might be a groundbreaking development: a machine that is aware of itself and its surroundings, and that could take in and process massive amounts of data in real time. It could be sent on dangerous missions, into space or combat. In addition to driving people around, it might be able to cook, clean, do laundry – and even keep humans company when other people aren't nearby. A particularly advanced set of machines could replace humans at literally all jobs.


The U.S. leads in artificial intelligence, but for how long?

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Even as the world's top artificial-intelligence researchers gathered in Los Angeles this week, many are beginning to wonder just how much longer the U.S. will remain the epicenter of AI. The Neural Information Processing System (NIPS) conference in Long Beach is the number one place for presenting breakthroughs in AI. But U.S. government policies threaten to put a dampener on the recent boom in the field. The U.S. Congress's tax plan is the latest challenge, threatening to raise costs for graduate students significantly. This follows reduced funding for fields including AI and tightening of rules on immigration for international researchers.


Humanoid robot carried the Olympic torch in South Korea

Daily Mail

It's a tradition that's been around since the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin, but now the torch relay has been given a very modern update. During the 41st day of the relay in the lead-up to the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics in South Korea, a humanoid robot carried the torch. The robot, called Hubo, walked about 150 metres (500 feet) to a wooden wall, before using a drill to cut a hole and pass the torch through. The robot participated in the relay past the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), where it was created. A video from KBS News shows the incredible moment in action.


A robot carried the Olympic torch in South Korea

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Robots are coming for the Olympics. On Monday, the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology's humanoid robot, HUBO, carried the Pyeongchang 2018 Olympics relay torch during a stretch in Daejon, South Korea. HUBO – decked out in an Olympic beanie -- received the torch from Professor Dennis Hong, the founding director of the Robotics and Mechanisms Laboratory at UCLA. The 47-inch tall robot then walked about 500 feet to a wooden wall where it used the drill on its arm to cut a hole and then punched through to pass the flame to its creator, Professor Oh Jun-ho. Jun-ho then passed the torch to KAIST's latest robot, FX-2.


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This article was originally published at The Conversation. The publication contributed the article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. Forget about today's modest incremental advances in artificial intelligence, such as the increasing abilities of cars to drive themselves. Waiting in the wings might be a groundbreaking development: a machine that is aware of itself and its surroundings, and that could take in and process massive amounts of data in real time. It could be sent on dangerous missions, into space or combat.


Artificially intelligent robots could gain consciousness

Daily Mail

From babysitting children to beating the world champion at Go, robots are slowly but surely developing more and more advanced capabilities. And many scientists, including Professor Stephen Hawking, suggest it may only be a matter of time before machines gain consciousness. In a new article for The Conversation, Professor Subhash Kak, Regents Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Oklahoma State University explains the possible consequences if artificial intelligence gains consciousness. In a new article for The Conversation, Professor Subhash Kak explains the possible consequences if artificial intelligence gains consciousness. Most computer scientists think that consciousness is a characteristic that will emerge as technology develops.


Artificial Intelligence Is Around the Corner. Educators Should Take Note

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One winter morning, a 5th grader will be awakened earlier than usual by Maestra, a commercially available virtual mentor that curates her comprehensive educational environment. Having monitored the child's cognitive and emotional development since shortly after her conception, the artificial-intelligence program will accurately anticipate that the morning's snowfall will add 10 minutes to the child's typical walk to school. During their morning dialogue over breakfast and the walk, the AI will reference The Snowy Day, a favorite storybook of the child's, having determined the intervention will induce an optimal psychological state for the school day's lessons. A district supervisor's predawn jog will have just ended when her retina-draping augmented-reality device scribbles adjusted teacher and student attendance rates (-1.5 percent and -2 percent, respectively), modifications to the day's projected energy consumption (an additional 200 kWh/school), recommended dietary adjustments for seven high-risk student populations scattered across 10 schools (reduced sugars for most, compensating for likely increases in morning stimulants), and last-minute wardrobe tips and talking points for a mid-morning video conference with principals (a blue-centric palette; bullish, data-driven forecasts for next fall's funding). Attention split, she will almost slip on an ice patch, grumbling, "I hate snowy days."