Goto

Collaborating Authors

polymer


Human and Artificial Intelligence Merge

#artificialintelligence

A breakthrough in materials could improve the efficiency and effectiveness of electronic implants in the human brain or other parts of the body. The advance could offer an array of biotechnology benefits and allow humans to control unmanned vehicles and other technologies directly with their brains. The development involves a polythiophene, or PEDOT, chemical structure. The newest materials, which David Martin describes as PEDOT Plus, dramatically enhances electronic implants in the body. Martin, who is a professor of materials science and engineering and associate dean, research and entrepreneurship, College of Engineering, University of Delaware, explains PEDOT materials have been around for years and can be chemically tailored for different purposes.


Machine Learning and AI Can Now Create Plastics That Easily Degrade

#artificialintelligence

Plastic pollution is one of the most pressing environmental issues, and the increase in the production of disposable plastics does not help at all. These plastics would often take many years before they degrade, which poisons the environment. This has prompted efforts from nations to create a global treaty to help reduce plastic pollution. A combination of machine learning and artificial intelligence has accelerated the design of making materials, including plastics, with properties that quickly degrade without harming the environment and super-strong lightweight plastics for aircraft and satellites that would one day replace the metals being used. The researchers from the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering (PME) at the University of Chicago published their study in Science Advances on October 21, which shows a way toward designing polymers using a combination of modeling and machine learning.


Army Researchers Dream New Self-Healing Material Will Lead to 'Terminator' Technology

#artificialintelligence

U.S. Army researchers have teamed with Texas A&M University to create a new polymer material that can shape-shift and autonomously heal itself as part of a research effort to improve future unmanned air and robotic vehicles. In early research, the first-of-its-kind, 3D-printable epoxy-based material can respond to stimuli, and researchers hope it will one day have embedded intelligence allowing it to adapt to its environment without any external control, according to a news release from Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's (CCDC) Army Research Laboratory. "We want a system of materials to simultaneously provide structure, sensing and response," said Frank Gardea, an aerospace engineer and principal investigator for the effort, at the CCDC. Gardea envisions a future platform, suitable for air and ground missions, with the "reconfiguration characteristics of the T-1000 character in the Hollywood film, 'Terminator 2.'" The hit film featured a Terminator made of liquid-metal that could form its arms into stabbing weapons and heal itself after being shot with everything from a 12-gauge shotgun to a 40mm grenade launcher. So far, the material has responded to temperature, which researchers first selected because of its ease of use during laboratory testing.


Material found by scientists 'could merge AI with human brain' – IAM Network

#artificialintelligence

Scientists have discovered a ground-breaking bio-synthetic material that they claim can be used to merge artificial intelligence with the human brain. The breakthrough, presented today at the American Chemical Society Fall 2020 virtual expo, is a major step towards integrating electronics with the body to create part human, part robotic "cyborg" beings. Connecting electronics to human tissue has been a major challenge due to traditional materials like gold, silicon and steel causing scarring when implanted. Scars not only cause damage but also interrupt electrical signals flowing between computers and muscle or brain tissue. The researchers from the University of Delaware were able to overcome this after various types of polymers.


US Army developing self-healing, shape-shifting drone material

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The US Army is pulling inspiration from the popular film'Terminator 2' in designing material capable of shape-shifting and autonomously healing. Made of polymer, the 3D printable component has a dynamic bond that allows it to go from liquid to solid multiple times. The new material is also equipped with a unique shape memory behavior, providing users with the ability to be program and trigger it to return to a previous form. The military group foresees the innovation being used to create morphing unmanned air vehicles and shape-shifting robotic platforms. The US Army is pulling inspiration from the popular science fiction film'Terminator 2' in designing material capable of shape-shifting and autonomously healing.


Optimizing Peptides in TensorFlow 2

#artificialintelligence

A guest post by Somesh Mohapatra, Rafael Gómez-Bombarelli of MIT IntroductionA polymer is a material made up of long repeating chains of molecules, like plastic or rubber. Polymers are made up of subunits (monomers) that are chemically bound to one another. The chemical composition and arrangement of monomers dictate the properties of the polymer.


New "Cyborg" Technology Could Enable Merger of Humans and AI

#artificialintelligence

Such devices could monitor for tumor development or stand in for damaged tissues. But connecting electronics directly to human tissues in the body is a huge challenge. Now, a team is reporting new coatings for components that could help them more easily fit into this environment. The researchers will present their results today (Agusut 17, 2020) at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting & Expo. ACS is holding the meeting through Thursday.


Material found by scientists 'could merge AI with human brain'

#artificialintelligence

Scientists have discovered a ground-breaking bio-synthetic material that they claim can be used to merge artificial intelligence with the human brain. The breakthrough, presented today at the American Chemical Society Fall 2020 virtual expo, is a major step towards integrating electronics with the body to create part human, part robotic "cyborg" beings. Connecting electronics to human tissue has been a major challenge due to traditional materials like gold, silicon and steel causing scarring when implanted. Scars not only cause damage but also interrupt electrical signals flowing between computers and muscle or brain tissue. The researchers from the University of Delaware were able to overcome this after various types of polymers.


Soft robotics actuators heal themselves

Robohub

Repeated activity wears on soft robotic actuators, but these machines' moving parts need to be reliable and easily fixed. Now a team of researchers has a biosynthetic polymer, patterned after squid ring teeth, that is self-healing and biodegradable, creating a material not only good for actuators, but also for hazmat suits and other applications where tiny holes could cause a danger. "Current self-healing materials have shortcomings that limit their practical application, such as low healing strength and long healing times (hours)," the researchers report in today's (July 27) issue of Nature Materials. The researchers produced high-strength synthetic proteins that mimic those found in nature. Like the creatures they are patterned on, the proteins can self-heal both minute and visible damage.


Soft robot actuators heal themselves

#artificialintelligence

"Current self-healing materials have shortcomings that limit their practical application, such as low healing strength and long healing times (hours)," the researcher report in today's issue of Nature Materials. The researchers produced high-strength synthetic proteins that mimic those found in nature. Like the creatures they are patterned on, the proteins can self-heal both minute and visible damage. "Our goal is to create self-healing programmable materials with unprecedented control over their physical properties using synthetic biology," said Melik Demirel, professor of engineering science and mechanics and holder of the Lloyd and Dorothy Foehr Huck Chair in Biomimetic Materials. Robotic machines from industrial robotic arms and prosthetic legs have joints that move and require a soft material that will accommodate this movement.