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AI journalism: What is it and should journalists see it as a threat?

#artificialintelligence

For many of us the term "artificial intelligence" still belongs in the realms of science-fiction and brings to mind the domineering Skynet in the Terminator films or the malevolent Hal in 2001: A Space Odyssey. A recent Press Gazette poll asking readers if they think AI robots are a threat to journalism or an opportunity found the majority (69%) of more than 1,200 voters saw AI as a threat. But while what's known as "artificial general intelligence" – machines akin or superior to human intelligence – does not yet exist and may never be fully realised, AI tools are already in use in the news industry today. These tools help in the gathering, production and distribution of information. They fall broadly under the definition of "machine learning", which is a subset of AI, where computers handle specific tasks and are able to learn and improve as they go, independent of human help.


Microsoft 'to replace journalists with robots'

BBC News

Microsoft is to replace dozens of contract journalists on its MSN website and use automated systems to select news stories, US and UK media report. The curating of stories from news organisations and selection of headlines and pictures for the MSN site is currently done by journalists. Artificial intelligence will perform these news production tasks, sources told the Seattle Times. Microsoft said it was part of an evaluation of its business. The US tech giant said in a statement: "Like all companies, we evaluate our business on a regular basis. This can result in increased investment in some places and, from time to time, redeployment in others. These decisions are not the result of the current pandemic."


The Role of News Organisations, Social Media & Fake News Analysis in Times

#artificialintelligence

The AI Experience Centre invites you to participate in the first session of its webinar series all of which focuses on the key take aways of the recent COVID-19 outbreak across a variety of sectors. Upon your registration we will send you the URL of the webinar via e-mail. The senior researchers will discuss the role of social media & fake news analysis in times of the COVID19 crisis. The webinar will also shed light on the key technological challenges the scientific community encountered to then finally provide insights for media players and policy-makers based on this experience. Come prepared and you will get the chance to ask questions from experts at the end of the sessions.


Technology & Journalism: The impact of Artificial Intelligence on our industry

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence is penetrating all corners of life. We've heard the Echo dots; we've met Sophia and we've asked Siri. But away from the every day AI that's rife in society, industries are starting to use the technology to their advantage, and the newsroom is no different. Organisations like Washington Post, Reuters and Press Association are all using their own forms of AI to improve the processes and systems that journalists are used to. At Forbes, their AI system'Bertie' has been programmed to give journalists first drafts and templates for stories.


Artificial intelligence won't kill journalism or save it, but the sooner newsrooms buy in, the better

#artificialintelligence

And here is a brief response to the report from Johannes Klingebiel of Süddeutsche Zeitung. A strategy for #AI adoption will vary depending on the nature of the news organisation. However, the #JournalismAI survey shows there are a few key key elements everyone should consider.


Newsrewired sneak peek podcast: diversity, artificial intelligence, and future-proofing journalism

#artificialintelligence

Our Newsrewired digital journalism conference is fast approaching and we are really excited about the speaker lineup and the topics we have in store. To offer you a taster of what is coming on 27 November, we caught up with four of our panelists on this week's podcast to talk about what delegates will take away from the event. Driving diversity in your newsroom is not just a worthy ideal, businesses also cannot afford to ignore the need to diversify their newsrooms to attract new audiences. Marverine Cole, journalist, broadcaster and academic, Birmingham City University touches on how she is championing diversity in education and the industry, but also why news organisations must focus their efforts on diversity to survive. For local news organisations, resources are spread thinly and it can be difficult to keep up with the workload.


Will robo-journalists displace human reporters in the near future? The trends in newsrooms suggest so

#artificialintelligence

In November 2018, a text-generating "bot" named Tobi produced an incredible 40,000 news stories about Switzerland elections in just five minutes for Tamedia. According to a paper presented at the Computation Journalism conference in Miami, Tobi wrote on vote results of Switzerland's 2,222 municipalities in both French and German. Just three months after the incredible feat was reported by world media, robo-journalism is now being touted to change media landscape in the coming years. Now, artificial intelligence programs, which have been available for more than a decade, are being used by in news organisations to produce stories, personalise new delivery and even anchor news bulletins, reported AFP. "We've seen a greater acceptance of the potential for artificial intelligence, or robo-journalism, in newsrooms around the world," Damian Radcliffe, a University of Oregon professor who follows business models for journalism, told the news agency.


Will robo-journalists displace human reporters in the near future? The trends in newsrooms suggest so

#artificialintelligence

In November 2018, a text-generating "bot" named Tobi produced an incredible 40,000 news stories about Switzerland elections in just five minutes for Tamedia. According to a paper presented at the Computation Journalism conference in Miami, Tobi wrote on vote results of Switzerland's 2,222 municipalities in both French and German. Just three months after the incredible feat was reported by world media, robo-journalism is now being touted to change media landscape in the coming years. Now, artificial intelligence programs, which have been available for more than a decade, are being used by in news organisations to produce stories, personalise new delivery and even anchor news bulletins, reported AFP. "We've seen a greater acceptance of the potential for artificial intelligence, or robo-journalism, in newsrooms around the world," Damian Radcliffe, a University of Oregon professor who follows business models for journalism, told the news agency.


Trump speech 'DeepFake' shows a present AI threat

#artificialintelligence

A so-called'DeepFake' video of a Trump speech was broadcast on a Fox-owned Seattle TV network, showing a very present AI threat. The station, Q13, broadcasted a doctored Trump speech in which he somehow appeared even more orange and pulled amusing faces. Following the broadcast, a Q13 employee was sacked. It's unclear if the worker created the clip or whether it was just allowed to air. The video could be the first DeepFake to be televised, but it won't be the last.


How machine learning is changing the newsroom

#artificialintelligence

The newsroom is unrecognisable from those of 10 years ago. Machine learning and other forms of technology falling within the artificial intelligence (AI) umbrella are being used by news organisations to increase efficiency, as well as profitability. How the LA Times used machine learning to interrogate statistics In a report found on Medium.com, Freia Nahser, innovation reporter and editor of Global Editors Network, explains how the Los Angeles Times used machine learning algorithms to show how the city's police department misclassified 14 000 serious assaults as minor offences between 2005 and 2012. This statistical change effectively lowered the city's crime rate, when the reality was somewhat different.