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Synthetic Data's Role In The Future Of AI - Liwaiwai

#artificialintelligence

As technology improves, AI and ML applications are becoming increasingly pivotal for businesses to stay ahead of their competition. The time will soon come when a business that doesn't leverage AI in its decision making processes will find itself out in the cold. While AI holds a lot of potential, the technology is still nascent and prone to error. A big reason for this is the so-called "cold start" problem. ML algorithms rely on historical data being fed to them, so they can learn and get better and better at predicting future data patterns.


YouTuber asks an AI for video ideas, gets a surprising response

#artificialintelligence

British YouTuber Tom Scott has such a distinctive style to his videos that they can -- and have -- lent themselves quite well to parody in the past, both from humans and AIs alike. But for his latest video, Scott decided to use this to his advantage. After getting access to OpenAI's GPT-3 text generator, Scott fed it a large number of his previous video titles to see if it could come up with some new and original story ideas for him. And after a few false starts with titles that were either too boring or nonsensical, it ended up nailing it. "GPT-3 has a setting called Temperature, which is basically how predictable it should be," explains Scott in the video above.


Netflix is making a Terminator anime with the studio behind 'Ghost in the Shell'

Engadget

A Terminator anime from the legendary studio behind the Ghost in the Shell franchise is coming to Netflix. The streaming giant didn't share any details on the plot, but showrunner Mattson Tomlin, who worked on Project Power for Netflix, told Variety he plans to approach the franchise in a way that "breaks conventions, subverts expectations and has real guts." If you're an anime fan, you need no introduction to Production I.G. In addition to adapting Masamune Shirow's seminal manga, the studio has worked on popular series like Psycho-Pass and Eden of the East. The most terrifying killing machine in sci-fi history is back, just like it promised.


How AI is Transforming the Entertainment Industry - Coruzant Technologies

#artificialintelligence

AI has been around for a while now when it comes to creating blockbuster movies and immersive video games, but this industry will continue to explode in 2021 and beyond. With total AI spend within the entertainment industry topping $329 million a year, says Business Wire, these technological advancements are helping professionals in all kinds of fields, from filmmaking and marketing to game development and advertising. AI is the go-to technology that not only offers amazing life-like quality to anything from video games to movies, it's designed to grab the audience's attention in unprecedented ways. Disney…Google…Intel…Microsoft…these are just some of the industry giants who are harnessing the power of AI to bring in more viewership, sell more tickets and dominate their industry. Let's take a look at how artificial intelligence is revolutionizing the media and entertainment industries.


Korea's First Space Blockbuster Just Premiered on Netflix. It's a Blast.

Slate

After a year with no new major blockbusters, Jo Sung-hee's Space Sweepers arrives as a breath of fresh air. It's not a perfect movie, nor a particularly innovative one, but the science-fiction adventure--touted as the first Korean space blockbuster--is certainly fun, with colorful performances and impressive CGI, and a worthy substitute for a new Star Wars or Marvel movie. However, its presence in a year of absences isn't the only thing that makes it noteworthy. Unlike nearly all of the movies from those two dominant franchises, Space Sweepers is led by people of color. The main characters are a crew of Koreans, and the film is one of the rare space operas that doesn't posit that English has somehow become a universal language.


The Medium Doesn't Live Up to Its Best Ideas

WIRED

Playing The Medium, a new horror game on Xbox and PC from developer Bloober Team, is like watching The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina on Netflix. The Medium has some fun ideas that it executes well, but the overall experience is bland and forgettable. Like Sabrina and a thousand other shows on Netflix, The Medium is inoffensive. It's a pleasant way to pass the time, but you probably won't finish it and you won't remember it a month after you put it down. It's the perfect game for Xbox's Game Pass, the service that seeks to be Netflix but for video games.


A Netflix employee accidentally killed Nintendo's live-action Zelda series

Engadget

This story is six years in the making, and it involves Zelda, Star Fox, another fox, College Humor, Netflix, Nintendo and Adam Conover. In February 2015, the Wall Street Journal reported Nintendo was putting together a live-action adaptation of the Legend of Zelda series for Netflix, described as "Game of Thrones for a family audience." The information came from an anonymous source close to the project. Other outlets covered the report, too -- but a Zelda Netflix show never materialized. Over the years, video game fans chalked it up to a crack in the rumor mill and moved on.


Chromecast with Google TV review: full smart TV upgrade with voice remote

The Guardian

Google's latest Chromecast streaming media dongle is a bit different. With a full interface and a remote, the new Chromecast with Google TV costs £59.99 and sits above the basic £30 Chromecast. You can still Google Cast to the new device, but the new flat plastic dongle is more than just a simple receiver, running the full Android TV software similar to the Nvidia Shield or smart TVs from Sony and others. Once plugged in, the new Chromecast is set up using the Google Home app on an Android, iPhone or iPad in about five minutes. Scan the QR code on your TV, log in with the required Google account, and choose some apps to install.


The molten glass on Netflix's 'Blown Away' looks good enough to eat

Mashable

Welcome to Thanks, I Love It, our series highlighting something onscreen we're obsessed with this week. There's a lot to enjoy in every episode of Netflix's Blown Away. The competition show for glassblowers has quirky competitors, fun guest judges, oodles of glasswork sex puns (drink every time someone says "glory hole"), and of course, the visual thrill of seeing simple glass turned into stunning works of art. Blown Away's editing relies on slow-motion shots of artists stretching ropes of shiny, glowing glass between their tools and close ups of hands manipulating technicolor goo into fantastic shapes. That focus on the material captures the danger of working with a substance heated to 2000 degrees Fahrenheit; it also makes the glass look absolutely delicious.


Tomb Raider and Skull Island anime series are headed to Netflix

Engadget

While we're still waiting on Netflix's Pacific Rim anime series, the streaming service has announced that it's also working on anime versions of Tomb Raider and Skull Island. Netflix is working with Legendary Television on all of those upcoming shows, and it follows a slew of anime announcements, including a Cyberpunk 2077 series, and a Resident Evil CG show (if you can call that anime). Gotta keep the weeb contingent happy, right? Netflix says the Tomb Raider series will follow the events of Square Enix's recent reboot trilogy, which leaves the door wide open for stories following a young Lara Croft. It'll be executive produced by Tasha Huo, who also worked on The Witcher: Blood Origin and Red Sonja.