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Panel Details Global Artificial Intelligence Arms Race

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Harnessing artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies has become the new arms race among the great powers, a Hudson Institute panel on handling big data in military operations said Monday. Speaking at the online forum, Richard Schultz, director of the international security program in the Fletcher School at Tufts University, said, "that's the way [Russian President Vladimir] Putin looks at it. I don't think we have a choice" but to view it the same way. He added in answer to a question that "the data in information space is enormous," so finding tools to filter out what's not necessary is critical. U.S. Special Operations Command is already using AI to do what in the old days was called political or psychological warfare, in addition to targeting, he added.


Panel on artificial intelligence urges US to boost tech skills amid China's rise

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An artificial intelligence commission led by former Google CEO Eric Schmidt is urging the U.S. to boost its AI skills to counter China, including by pursuing "AI-enabled" weapons – something that Google itself has shied away from on ethical grounds. Schmidt and current executives from Google, Microsoft, Oracle and Amazon are among the 15 members of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, which released its final report to Congress on Monday. "To win in AI we need more money, more talent, stronger leadership," Schmidt said Monday. The report says that machines that can "perceive, decide, and act more quickly" than humans and with more accuracy are going to be deployed for military purposes -- with or without the involvement of the U.S. and other democracies. It warns against unchecked use of autonomous weapons but expresses opposition to a global ban.


5 Ways Artificial Intelligence Will Forever Change The Battlefield

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Anyone with a wet finger in the air has by now heard that Google is facing an identity crisis because of its links to the American military. To crudely summarise, Google chose not to renew its "Project Maven" contract to provide artificial intelligence (A.I) capabilities to the U.S. Department of Defense after employee dissent reached a boiling point. This is an issue for Google, as the "Do No Evil" company is currently in an arm-wrestling match with Amazon and Microsoft for some juicy Cloud and A.I government contracts worth around $10B. Rejecting such work would deprive Google of a potentially huge business; in fact, Amazon recently advertised its image recognition software "Rekognition for defense", and Microsoft has touted the fact that its cloud technology is currently used to handle classified information within every branch of the American military. Nevertheless, the nature of the company's culture means that proceeding with big defence contracts could drive A.I experts away from Google.


Panel Details Global Artificial Intelligence Arms Race - USNI News

#artificialintelligence

Harnessing artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies has become the new arms race among the great powers, a Hudson Institute panel on handling big data in military operations said Monday. Speaking at the online forum, Richard Schultz, director of the international security program in the Fletcher School at Tufts University, said, "that's the way [Russian President Vladimir] Putin looks at it. I don't think we have a choice" but to view it the same way. He added in answer to a question that "the data in information space is enormous," so finding tools to filter out what's not necessary is critical. U.S. Special Operations Command is already using AI to do what in the old days was called political or psychological warfare, in addition to targeting, he added.


Coordinating Artificial Intelligence: Six Lessons from the US

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In a single day, the US's reconnaissance aircraft and satellites collect more raw data than the entire defence workforce could analyse in their aggregate lifetimes. Security officials are trying to find needles in ever-expanding digital haystacks. As a recent RUSI paper recognises, this information overload is also'perhaps the greatest technical challenge facing the UK's national security community'. Over the last year as a Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University, I explored how defence and intelligence organisations are using artificial intelligence (AI) to respond to that overload. Beyond the technology itself, I wanted to find out how the US has created the foundations for successfully deploying AI: a skilled workforce, data management, computational power, cloud platforms, technical foundations of security and trust, and a prudent policy framework.


Maven Acquires Machine-Learning Personalization Company LiftIgniter

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Maven (MVEN), the parent company of TheStreet.com, said Thursday it completed the acquisition of Petametrics, Inc., DBA LiftIgniter, marking the fourth technology platform closing for Maven in less than two years. "Our team's mission remains unchanged since the early days of digital media, which is to empower great journalism with great technology, material distribution, and monetization," Maven founder James Heckman said in a statement. "LiftIgniter enables and enhances all three of these focus areas. Its powerful personalization technology, together with Maven's leading-edge technology stack, creates a product offering for publishers unmatched in the industry." LiftIgniter uses machine learning algorithms to determine in-the-moment user interest and intent to produce a personalized online experience, Maven said.


MAVEN: Multi-Agent Variational Exploration

Neural Information Processing Systems

Centralised training with decentralised execution is an important setting for cooperative deep multi-agent reinforcement learning due to communication constraints during execution and computational tractability in training. In this paper, we analyse value-based methods that are known to have superior performance in complex environments. We specifically focus on QMIX, the current state-of-the-art in this domain. We show that the representation constraints on the joint action-values introduced by QMIX and similar methods lead to provably poor exploration and suboptimality. Furthermore, we propose a novel approach called MAVEN that hybridises value and policy-based methods by introducing a latent space for hierarchical control.


The Pentagon promises to use artificial intelligence for good, not evil

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The military has its eye on artificial intelligence solutions to everything from data analysis to surveillance, maintenance and medical care, but before the Defense Department moves full steam ahead into an AI future, they're laying out some ethical principles to live by. "The United States, together with our allies and partners, must accelerate the adoption of AI and lead in its national security applications to maintain our strategic position, prevail on future battlefields, and safeguard the rules-based international order," said Esper wrote. "AI technology will change much about the battlefield of the future, but nothing will change America's steadfast commitment to responsible and lawful behavior." The list is the result of a 15-month study by the Defense Innovation Board, which is made up of academics and executives in tech and business, who presented their proposed principles in a public forum at Georgetown University in October. According to Esper's Monday memo, the Pentagon pledges that its AI efforts will be: 1) Responsible, 2) Equitable, 3) Traceable, 4) Reliable and 5) Governable.


The Pentagon's AI Chief Prepares for Battle

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Nearly every day, in war zones around the world, American military forces request fire support. By radioing coordinates to a howitzer miles away, infantrymen can deliver the awful ruin of a 155-mm artillery shell on opposing forces. If defense officials in Washington have their way, artificial intelligence is about to make that process a whole lot faster. The effort to speed up fire support is one of a handful initiatives that Lt. Gen. Jack Shanahan describes as the "lower consequence missions" that the Pentagon is using to demonstrate how it can integrate artificial intelligence into its weapons systems. As the head of the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center, a 140-person clearinghouse within the Department of Defense focused on speeding up AI adoption, Shanahan and his team are building applications in well-established AI domains--tools for predictive maintenance and health record analysis--but also venturing into the more exotic, pursuing AI capabilities that would make the technology a centerpiece of American warfighting.


Google's AI Chief Wants to Do More With Less (Data)

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Whatever the future role of computers in society, Jeff Dean will have a powerful hand in the outcome. As the leader of Google's sprawling artificial intelligence research group, he steers work that contributes to everything from self-driving cars to domestic robots to Google's juggernaut online ad business. WIRED talked with Dean in Vancouver at the world's leading AI conference, NeurIPS, about his team's latest explorations--and how Google is trying to put ethical limits on them. WIRED: You gave a research talk about building new kinds of computers to power machine learning. What new ideas is Google testing?