mailonline


Google patent reveals plans for AI baby monitor that can tell parents when their child is waking up

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Google has filed a patent for an AI-powered baby monitor to tell parents exactly what their child is up to at any given time. The patent, published this month and uncovered by CNBC, details a device equipped with eye-tracking technology that would detect when a baby is awake or asleep. It would also be able to differentiate between normal and abnormal behaviors based on sound and movement, and let parents know if the baby appears to be uncomfortable. According to CNBC, the monitor described in the patent would come with'eye state analysis' that relies on changes in the irises, pupils, and whites of the eye to identify a baby's sleep state. It would also take the baby's body position into consideration, and be able to differentiate between standing, kneeling, climbing, or laying down.


Nissan develops a self-driving golf ball that putts perfectly every time

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Some golfers are blessed with an enormous drive, but many are cursed with a shoddy short game. Now, Nissan has tried to cure these woes by creating a fully-functioning self-driving golf ball which putts itself perfectly in the hole every time. A video released by the Japanese manufacturer shows it being hit in a wayward direction by a toddler, before self-adjusting and bagging a birdie. A publicity video released by the Japanese manufacturer shows the'self-driving' ball being hit in a wayward direction by a toddler, before self-adjusting and bagging a birdie When the ball is hit, a monitoring system calculates the correct route based on the ball's movement and adjusts its trajectory. Combining sensing technology with an internal electric motor, the ProPILOT golf ball stays on route until reaching the cup.


US Army is working on AI-guided missiles that 'pick their OWN targets'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The U.S. government is spending millions of dollars on creating intelligent missiles - which will determine for targets for themselves. The Cannon-Delivered Area Effects Munition (C-DAEM) system will use GPS to identify enemy tanks and armoured shells, which will be scanned in advance from the skies. According to sources, the Pentagon will invest vast sums into the AI-guided munitions, which could be ready by 2021. They will replace the Dual-Purpose Improved Conventional Munition (DPICM) artillery rounds, which were introduced in the 1980s. Cannon-Delivered Area Effects Munition system: The U.S. government is spending millions of dollars on creating intelligent missiles - which will determine for targets for themselves C-DAEM is a 155-millimeter artillery shell, and will be available for the M777 towed howitzer, the M109A6 Paladin self-propelled howitzer, and the new XM1299 self-propelled howitzer, which has a range of up to 43 miles.


Higher quality screens make watching TV more enjoyable, study suggests

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Bingeing your favourite boxset will be more enjoyable if you're watching it on a modern TV screen, new research suggests. Identical twin brothers were monitored by AI as they sat down to enjoy the same episode of Game of Thrones in separate rooms on different TV sets. Experimenters found that the sibling watching on the most up to date screen displayed the greatest physical and emotional responses. Bingeing your favourite boxset will be more enjoyable if you're watching it on a modern TV screen, new research suggests. Realeyes' AI platform analysed the facial expressions, head movements and body language from more than 144,000 frames of video footage captured of each twin.


USS Grunion's bow discovered off the coast of Alaska nearly 80 years after the submarine sunk

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Ocean explorers have discovered the bow of the USS Grunion off the coast of Alaska nearly 80 years after it was lost during the Second World War. A team from the Lost 52 Project found the submarine part in 2,700 ft (820m) of water near the Aleutian Islands using pioneering robot technology. The Gato-class submarine, which was carrying 70 people on board when it sank, was last heard from in July 1942. In 2006, the sons of the ship's captain Lieutenant Commander Mannert'Jim' Abele - Bruce, Brad and John - began a search for the lost submarine, finding it a year later. The USS Grunion was a Gato-class submarine that sank during the Second World War.


Alexa can 'listen to users having sex' with some audio heard by Amazon staff, whistleblower claims

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Amazon staff review thousands of audio recordings made by Alexa each day -- including snippets of couples arguing and having sex -- an investigation claims. The clips were accidentally captured by the popular digital assistant -- confusing the noises for the commands it should be listening to -- and sent off for analysis. Staff at the tech firm review one in every five-hundred recordings made by Alexa, whether of deliberate commands to the assistant or accidental recordings. According to a privacy expert, the revelation is a reminder of the extent of the personal information that the tech firm has on its users. Amazon has an English-speaking team monitoring thousands of Alexa recordings daily based in Bucharest, Romania, the Sun claims, along with similar setups in Boston, Costa Rica and India.


AI tool that can spot text written by a machine could spell the end of fake news

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A team of U.S. researchers has developed a program that weeds-out fake news. The Giant Language Model Test Room is devised by IT experts at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in a bid to counter inauthentic journalism. Based around predictive language models, which allow computers and bots to write copy, the system aims to machine algorithms. According to results of their own research, GLTR helped to improve the detection-rate of forged text from 54 percent to 72 percent - meaning the days of misinformation could potentially be numbered. Due to their modeling power,automated language models have the potential to generate textual output that is indistinguishable from the real thing - AKA it's often fake news The Giant Language Model Test Room enables forensic analysis of how likely an automatic system generated a text.


Website called AI portraits turns your selfies into artistic portraits

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new website can turn your selfies into Renaissance works of art by re-imagining them in classical portrait form. There's a number of styles included in the database, covering artists from Rembrandt to Titian to van Gogh which allows it to render your face in oil, watercolour or ink. Unlike similar apps like FaceApp, the algorithm here is not merely'painting over' your face in a new style, according to the Verge. Using Deep Learning, the researchers loaded paintings from the Early Renaissance to contemporary art to help train the Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) models. MailOnline's Peter Lloyd had his image converted into a moustache-adorned Victorian MailOnline health editor Stephen Matthew (pictured) turned his Facebook profile picture of him sitting in a filed into a classical portrait with dense eyebrows.


Revolutionary camera app removes unwanted bystanders and tourists from your pictures

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new app can help give you the perfect Instagram shot by removing bystanders and tourists from photos in busy locations. Named Bye Bye Camera, the developer describes it as an art project and an app'for the post-human era'. Artist Damjanski created the software with Do Something Good, an'incubation collective' where coders and artists pool their resources to create projects. The app uses the same AI tools found in facial recognition software to identify people using an object detection algorithm called YOLO (You Only Look Once). It then uses a separate tool to fill in the space left behind with what Adobe has dubbed'context-aware fill'.


RoboDUCK could be used in Japan to keep rice paddy fields free from pests and weeds

Daily Mail - Science & tech

An engineer working for Japanese carmaker Nissan has built a robot to help farmers reduce the use of herbicides and pesticides on their rice crops. The compact robot, called Aigamo, is designed to mimic the natural use of ducks that paddle around in flooded paddy fields. Ducks have been used as natural weed repellents for centuries to tear them up and feed on insects, with their manure even acting as an additional fertiliser. As it glides through the water, two mechanisms on the bottom muddy the water to prevent weeds from getting enough sunlight to grow. The technique was used in the late 20th century with live ducks, called'aigamo,' which would paddle the water with the same results and eat any insects they found along the way.