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Revolutionary camera app removes unwanted bystanders and tourists from your pictures

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new app can help give you the perfect Instagram shot by removing bystanders and tourists from photos in busy locations. Named Bye Bye Camera, the developer describes it as an art project and an app'for the post-human era'. Artist Damjanski created the software with Do Something Good, an'incubation collective' where coders and artists pool their resources to create projects. The app uses the same AI tools found in facial recognition software to identify people using an object detection algorithm called YOLO (You Only Look Once). It then uses a separate tool to fill in the space left behind with what Adobe has dubbed'context-aware fill'.


RoboDUCK could be used in Japan to keep rice paddy fields free from pests and weeds

Daily Mail - Science & tech

An engineer working for Japanese carmaker Nissan has built a robot to help farmers reduce the use of herbicides and pesticides on their rice crops. The compact robot, called Aigamo, is designed to mimic the natural use of ducks that paddle around in flooded paddy fields. Ducks have been used as natural weed repellents for centuries to tear them up and feed on insects, with their manure even acting as an additional fertiliser. As it glides through the water, two mechanisms on the bottom muddy the water to prevent weeds from getting enough sunlight to grow. The technique was used in the late 20th century with live ducks, called'aigamo,' which would paddle the water with the same results and eat any insects they found along the way.


Cutting edge two-armed droids can make sushi, play chess and pour the perfect BEER

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Artificial intelligence experts have shown off their latest wares at a trade conference - including robots that can make sushi, pour beers and play chess. Robot X Manufacturing Expo 2019 attendees in Bangkok, Thailand, yesterday, were wowed by a number of two-armed robots. Swiss firm ABB's robot can hold a cup in one hand - at a 90 degree angle for the perfect pour - while tipping beer into it from the other. Thanks to its dual-armed nature, Japanese firm Kawasaki's SCARA robot can complete a number of tasks with ease. As well as combining sushi rice with fish before serving, it can also make pizzas, evenly spreading sauce before adding cheese and other toppings to be cooked.


Facebook wants to send 'emotional' robots to explore and scan faces to 'help users make friends'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Facebook is considering building'emotionally sensitive' robots that can explore the world, identify objects and people and enable users to make friends remotely. On-board sensors would allow the robots to spot people to engage with, judge their emotional state and listen to what they are saying, a patent filing revealed. At the same time, the robot could display images, video and speak with people -- potentially letting users meet people and make new friends remotely. However, it is not known whether Facebook will follow through on the patent filing and make the rough robot designs a reality. Facebook is considering building'emotionally sensitive' robots (pictured, in this rough sketch from the patent that the social media firm filed) that can explore the world, identify objects and people and enable users to make friends remotely Cameras to detect faces and interpret emotional states.


Scientists discover potent compound that can kill superbugs that pose a threat to humanity

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Scientists have discovered a compound which can destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria and hailed their work as a'breakthrough'. They found a type of chemical called a dinuclear Ru(II) complex which may be able to destroy bacteria too strong for treatment with normal medicines. Success in lab tests has given hope for a new way to tackle superbugs, which are becoming more common, more dangerous, and more difficult to stop. Pneumonia, urinary tract infections and gonorrhoea are all caused by the gram-negative type of bacteria used in the tests. And figures estimate that, by 2050, 10million people a year will die because of infections which have evolved to be untreatable.


Raspberry-picking MACHINES will replace dwindling numbers of migrant farm workers

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Hours spent toiling away under the beating sun to harvest berries and fruit may soon be a thing of the past as robots look set to replace humans in the field. A £700,000 machine built by the University of Plymouth has succeeded in plucking a raspberry from a plant and carefully placing it in a punnet. The painstaking process takes a whole minute to get one berry because it requires a combination of soft robotics, clever AI and'deep learning'. It stands around six foot tall (1.8metres) and will combat a continued drop in the amount of migrant farm workers available for the arduous harvests. Fieldwork Robotics, a spin-off from the university dedicated to agricultural robots, built the machine and says it will be able to pick 25,000 fruits a day in the future.


Are YOU a kinesthetic or auditory learner?

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Whether you're studying for an exam or revising for a presentation, a quiz on identifying different learning methods promises to help you maximise the amount of information you can retain. Formed of ten questions, the quick quiz by Tutor House asks participants to consider how they would respond in a series of scenarios. This technique reveals if they would benefit most from visual, auditory, read and write or kinesthetic (interactive) learning methods. Created by Tutor House in partnership with educational experts, the quiz considers the widely used VARK (Visual, Aural, Read/write, and Kinesthetic) learning styles developed by Fleming's in 1987. Visual learners are likely to respond to visual stimuli like photos and videos to remember things.


Spotify unveils a voice-controlled smart device, dubbed 'Car Thing'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Spotify has launched a new voice-controlled smart device, marking a debut in the hardware industry. Dubbed'Car Thing,' it plugs into a vehicle's cigarette lighter and allows users to turn on their favorite playlist hands-free while they're driving. The device is being rolled out among a small group of test users in the coming weeks, according to the Verge. Spotify has launched a new voice-controlled smart device, marking a debut in the hardware industry. It allows users to turn on their favorite playlist hands-free while they're driving Users plug it into their car's 12-volt outlet, or cigarette lighter.


Smart speakers like Alexa and Google are 'SEXIST'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Smart home devices understand men better than women, according to a new YouGov survey. It found 67 per cent of female owners say that their device fails to respond to a voice command at least'sometimes', compared to 54 per cent of male owners. It also revealed men are ruder to their devices but experience fewer problems being understood. Men are more likely to take an brusque tone with theirs than women yet women have more problems with getting a response to their commands. The smart devices seem to respond less well to women than men, based on the survey results.


Amazon is keeping your Alexa data in text form even AFTER you delete the audio recordings

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Voice recordings captured by Amazon's Alexa can be deleted but the automatically produced transcriptions remain in the company's cloud, according to reports. After Alexa hears its'wake' word, the smart assistant starts listening and transcribing everything it hears. All the voice commands said to the virtual assistant can be deleted from the central system, but the company still has the the text logs, according to CNET. This data is kept on its cloud servers, with no option for users to delete it, but the company claims it is working on ways to make the data inaccessible. Amazon workers are listening to private and sometimes disturbing voice recordings to improve the voice-assistants understanding of human speech.