legislation


Automated Discrimination?

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Artificial intelligence is playing an increasingly important yet invisible role in our everyday lives. Many sectors, including healthcare, education, financial services, labour markets and advertising are now using automated decision-making processes by processing large amounts of data. While automated decision-making and other types of AI offer us benefits and seem to make our lives easier, they can be subject to bias. Discrimination against women, people of colour, or poor people are making their way into algorithmic decision-making, which may be exacerbating existing inequalities. On behalf of the Digital Working Group of the Greens/EFA, MEPs Alexandra Geese, Patrick Breyer, Marcel Kolaja, Kim van Sparrentak, Sergey Lagodinsky and Damian Boeselager would like to invite you to a hearing to discuss the societal impact of automated decision-making processes with a special focus on discrimination.


Public opinion lessons for AI regulation

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An overwhelming majority of the American public believes that artificial intelligence (AI) should be carefully managed. Nevertheless, as the three case studies in this brief show, the public does not agree on the proper regulation of AI applications. Indeed, population-level support of an AI application may belie opposition by some subpopulations. Many AI applications, such as facial recognition technology, could cause disparate harm to already vulnerable subgroups, particularly ethnic minorities and low-income individuals. In addition, partisan divisions are likely to prevent government regulation of AI applications that could be used to influence electoral politics.


Irish potholes and poor road markings great test for self-driving cars

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The Government is to amend road traffic legislation to allow for the testing of self-driving vehicles on Irish roads. So what has the State got to give the autonomous driving world? It seems that Irish motorists' pain is the automotive industry's potential gain. Self-driving vehicles use a combination of video and radar to feed data to the self-driving programmes. Both the cameras and the radars have shown to work reasonably well on the dry and well-marked highways of certain US states such as California.


Legislation to test self-driving cars on public roads approved by Cabinet

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TheJournal.ie supports the work of the Press Council of Ireland and the Office of the Press Ombudsman, and our staff operate within the Code of Practice. You can obtain a copy of the Code, or contact the Council, at www.presscouncil.ie, Please note that TheJournal.ie uses cookies to improve your experience and to provide services and advertising. For more information on cookies please refer to our cookies policy. News images provided by Press Association and Photocall Ireland unless otherwise stated.


Legislation to test self-driving cars on public roads approved by Cabinet

#artificialintelligence

TheJournal.ie supports the work of the Press Council of Ireland and the Office of the Press Ombudsman, and our staff operate within the Code of Practice. You can obtain a copy of the Code, or contact the Council, at www.presscouncil.ie, Please note that TheJournal.ie uses cookies to improve your experience and to provide services and advertising. For more information on cookies please refer to our cookies policy. News images provided by Press Association and Photocall Ireland unless otherwise stated.


Big Brother is watching: Chinese city with 2.6m cameras is world's most heavily surveilled

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Qiu Rui, a policeman in Chongqing, was on duty this summer when he received an alert from a facial recognition system at a local square. There was a high probability a man caught on camera was a suspect in a 2002 murder case, the system told him. The depth, breadth and intrusiveness of China's mass surveillance may be unprecedented in modern history The city's surveillance system scans facial features of people on the streets from frames of video footage in real time, creating a virtual map of the face. It can then match this information against scanned faces of suspects in a police database. If there is a match that passes a preset threshold, typically 60% or higher, the system immediately notifies officers.


Big Brother is watching: Chinese city with 2.6m cameras is world's most heavily surveilled

#artificialintelligence

Qiu Rui, a policeman in Chongqing, was on duty this summer when he received an alert from a facial recognition system at a local square. There was a high probability a man caught on camera was a suspect in a 2002 murder case, the system told him. The depth, breadth and intrusiveness of China's mass surveillance may be unprecedented in modern history The city's surveillance system scans facial features of people on the streets from frames of video footage in real time, creating a virtual map of the face. It can then match this information against scanned faces of suspects in a police database. If there is a match that passes a preset threshold, typically 60% or higher, the system immediately notifies officers.


China makes it a criminal offense to publish deepfakes or fake news without disclosure

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China has released a new government policy designed to prevent the spread of fake news and misleading videos created using artificial intelligence, otherwise known as deepfakes. The new rule, reported earlier today by Reuters, bans the publishing of false information or deepfakes online without proper disclosure that the post in question was created with AI or VR technology. Failure to disclose this is now a criminal offense, the Chinese government says. The rules go into effect on January 1st, 2020, and will be enforced by the Cyberspace Administration of China. "With the adoption of new technologies, such as deepfake, in online video and audio industries, there have been risks in using such content to disrupt social order and violate people's interests, creating political risks and bringing a negative impact to national security and social stability," the CAC said in a notice to online video hosting websites on Friday, according to the South China Morning Post.


China makes it a criminal offense to publish deepfakes or fake news without disclosure

#artificialintelligence

China has released a new government policy designed to prevent the spread of fake news and misleading videos created using artificial intelligence, otherwise known as deepfakes. The new rule, reported earlier today by Reuters, bans the publishing of false information or deepfakes online without proper disclosure that the post in question was created with AI or VR technology. Failure to disclose this is now a criminal offense, the Chinese government says. The rules go into effect on January 1st, 2020, and will be enforced by the Cyberspace Administration of China. "With the adoption of new technologies, such as deepfake, in online video and audio industries, there have been risks in using such content to disrupt social order and violate people's interests, creating political risks and bringing a negative impact to national security and social stability," the CAC said in a notice to online video hosting websites on Friday, according to the South China Morning Post.


China makes it a criminal offense to publish deepfakes or fake news without disclosure

#artificialintelligence

China has released a new government policy designed to prevent the spread of fake news and misleading videos created using artificial intelligence, otherwise known as deepfakes. The new rule, reported earlier today by Reuters, bans the publishing of false information or deepfakes online without proper disclosure that the post in question was created with AI or VR technology. Failure to disclose this is now a criminal offense, the Chinese government says. The rules go into effect on January 1st, 2020, and will be enforced by the Cyberspace Administration of China. "With the adoption of new technologies, such as deepfake, in online video and audio industries, there have been risks in using such content to disrupt social order and violate people's interests, creating political risks and bringing a negative impact to national security and social stability," the CAC said in a notice to online video hosting websites on Friday, according to the South China Morning Post.