human assistance


Can 'air traffic control' make self-driving cars cheap and safe? - Futurity

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You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. Combining human and artificial intelligence in autonomous vehicles could push self-driving cars more quickly toward wide-scale adoption, researchers say. That's the goal of a new project that relies on a technique called instantaneous crowdsourcing to provide a cost-effective, real-time remote backup for onboard autonomous systems without the need for a human to be physically in the driver's seat. "Today's autonomous vehicles can drive relatively well in typical settings, but they fail in exceptional situations…" The need for human safety drivers in vehicles like Waymo's recently introduced autonomous taxis undermines their cost advantage compared to traditional ride sharing services, the researchers say. It also keeps the era of cars as autonomous rolling living rooms tantalizingly out of reach.


Autonomous testing Is like autonomous driving: The AI needs human assistance

ZDNet

Transportation is about to get a technology-driven reboot. The details are still taking shape, but future transport systems will certainly be connected, data-driven and highly automated. The US Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has defined a scale to describe the autonomous capabilities that self-driving cars have -- i.e., their levels of automation. Also: Can humans get a handle on AI? Level 5 is full automation, which allows self-driving cars to operate with no human assistance. Google and Uber, among others, are aiming to develop level 5 cars, but many consider this to be a moonshot.


Over half of consumers will choose a chatbot over a human to save time

ZDNet

Despite reports that robots will soon take over our jobs and our lives, we love the simplicity that AI brings into our lives. The internet of things embeds intelligence into business processes to let us measure and manage the enterprise in ways that were never possible before. According to a new report, consumers across generations crave human interaction when engaging with brands. They do not expect or want technology to replace real people, but trust humans to help solve more complex problems and make their experiences more enjoyable. Voice of customer (VoC) platform Usabilla has released a report showing that humans love AI and chatbots.


How To Amazon-ize Your Customer Experience Today

Forbes Technology

There are plenty of ways in which your business shouldn't Amazon-ize its customer experience–because there's only one Amazon, and if you're reading this article, it's probably not you. Your business is likely to have more color, flavor, local relevance and story than Amazon does; these are powerful advantages, what Seth Godin might call "the edges that matter," that you need to do everything in your power to preserve and enhance. Yet what Amazon does well, in terms of its customer experience, it does extremely well. Here are three moves that, if I were your customer experience consultant, I'd advise you to take toward emulating that extraordinary Amazon customer experience. This means different things for different types of businesses.


A machine has figured out Rubik's Cube all by itself

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The Rubik's Cube is a three-dimensional puzzle developed in 1974 by the Hungarian inventor Erno Rubik, the object being to align all squares of the same color on the same face of the cube. It became an international best-selling toy and sold over 350 million units. The puzzle has also attracted considerable interest from computer scientists and mathematicians. One question that has intrigued them is the smallest number of moves needed to solve it from any position. The answer, proved in 2014, turns out to be 26.


A machine has figured out Rubik's Cube all by itself

#artificialintelligence

The Rubik's Cube is a three-dimensional puzzle developed in 1974 by the Hungarian inventor Erno Rubik, the object being to align all squares of the same color on the same face of the cube. It became an international best-selling toy and sold over 350 million units. The puzzle has also attracted considerable interest from computer scientists and mathematicians. One question that has intrigued them is the smallest number of moves needed to solve it from any position. The answer, proved in 2014, turns out to be 26.


Europe could spend up to £440m on killer robots

Daily Mail

The European Union could spend up to £440 million ($590 million) on killer robots that wage warfare without the need for human assistance. Officially known as Lethal Autonomous Weapons (LAWs), the robots use artificial intelligence to target and kill enemies without human involvement. Brussels has decided to allow bankrolling of the controversial machines through the EU defence fund despite MEPs' attempts to bar LAWs from the kitty. The European Union could spend up to £440 million ($590 million) on killer robots that wage warfare without the need for human assistance. The parliament had wanted to block EU subsidies of the weapons but conceded in talks on Tuesday in order to strike a compromise, two sources who were in the room told the EUObserver.


The unforeseen consequences of an AI-built social network

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Artificial intelligence is one of the most powerful technologies invented by humankind. This technology has affected almost every industry, including the medical, finance, and banking Industries. Due to its enormous potential, investors are sinking some serious funding into AI. Results from a study conducted by Forrester Research predict that investments in AI will increase by 300 percent in 2017. Many tech giants like Facebook, Google, Apple, Microsoft, and others have already started investing time and money into discovering AI technologies to supplement their offerings.


The Yet Untapped Potential of AI

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The moment of the next revolution in the history of mankind is fast approaching – the difference between this and all previous revolutions, both social and economic, is that this time we won't be in it alone. We will be accompanied by complex computer systems carrying out activities, which, due to our cognitive abilities, were previously reserved only for human beings. The era of artificial intelligence is here. Probably the most famous examples of the application of artificial intelligence, though rather simplistic, were the chess duels between grandmaster Garry Kasparov and IBM computer Deep Blue in 1996 and 1997. These duels were supposed to show that a machine can not only perform certain actions similar to a human being, but also outperform its human counterpart.


Robotic surgeon could stitch you up after removing your appendix

New Scientist

The robot will see you now. For the first time, a robot has successfully operated on live soft tissue without human assistance. The surgeons who developed the robot hope that in two or three years it will be ready to perform routine surgeries, such as removing an inflamed appendix or blocked gall bladder. "It's a proof of concept to show it can be done," says Peter Kim at the Children's National Medical Center in Washington DC. "We've shown a robot can do soft-tissue surgery, that it can be done autonomously, and that the outcome is better than that of a real surgeon."