healthcare


Everything you need to know about AI

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is a form of computer science that is built to have machines think and respond like humans, understanding natural language and reasoning with data in a way similar to the human brain. It refers to programming computer technology, known as machine learning, to complement the human mind when making decisions, making make our jobs easier and minimising repetitive tasks. For some businesses, AI still appears to be in its infancy. However, the technology definitely has the potential to transform many organisations as well as the technology industry as a whole. AI has been adopted to automate a number of roles in businesses.


What is it like to be a machine learning engineer in 2018?

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There are so many tools, platforms and resources available, MLEs can focus their time on solving problems critical to their field or company instead of worrying about building platforms and hand rolling numerical algorithms. Google Cloud has easy means of building and deploying TensorFlow models including their new TPU support in beta, AWS has an ever evolving suite of deep learning AMIs and Nvidia has a great deep learning SDK. In parallel, Apple's coreML and Android's NN API make is simpler and faster to deploy models on phones; this will continue to push the boundary for developing and releasing ML apps. With all of the above, there is healthy competition among big players in the cloud space pushing the whole ecosystem forward. And yet, most of them are finding ways to collaborate towards open standards like ONNX.


How Aggressive AI Adoption Could Harm Healthcare Industry

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Many health organizations lack the capabilities needed to ensure that their artificial intelligence (AI) and Internet of Things (IoT) systems act accurately, responsibly, and transparently, according to a new study. Accenture's Digital Health Technology Vision 2018 report identified a range of issues related to the aggressive adoption of AI and the greater role it plays in healthcare decision making, and counseled the need for organizations to instill trust and transparency into the design of their technology systems. The study also explored five trends facing healthcare over the next three years as technology becomes an intrinsic part of care delivery. "We see these technology trends in two categories--'enablers' and'consequences' (the first three being'enablers' and the last two'consequences')--as emerging technologies enable the system to help people in new ways but also introduce new issues as technology becomes deeply intertwined in our lives and in our care," says Kaveh Safavi, MD, JD, head of Accenture's global health practice.


Why Isn't the Healthcare Industry Adopting AI More Quickly?

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Artificial intelligence (AI) could be part of the solution. AI technologies could help to improve access to care, improve outcomes and make better use of physician time. But there are many barriers to adoption of AI in the healthcare industry. These include the difficulty of assembling the digital data AI needs, as well as a lack of AI workers right across the world. A lack of patient data in digital format is just one of the barriers to AI use in healthcare.


PwC Exec: AI Offers Significant Opportunity for Companies Across All Sectors

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Artificial intelligence (AI) presents a "huge opportunity" for media, healthcare and other companies when it comes to their financial health and how "people communicate and trade with each other," according to Gary Rapsey, global assurance disruption and innovation leader at PwC UK. Major advances are being made in healthcare today, with the help of AI, he said June 7 at the H2O World Conference. "When I contrast that with company health, however … little has changed in that space in the way that company health is both diagnosed and company health cured," he said. Unlike in the world of healthcare, the best technology isn't typically being used to help companies' accountants, he told the conference. They're there to keep businesses and the market honest.


33 Industries Other Than Auto That Driverless Cars Could Turn Upside Down

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Fast food, real estate, military operations, even home improvement -- many large industries will have to shift their strategies in the wake of driverless cars. It's all but a certainty that autonomous or driverless vehicles will be widely used in the United States at some point over the next two decades. Already, over two dozen major corporates including Google, Apple and Mercedes Benz are hard at work building their own self-driving vehicles. Tesla's Model S already includes an autopilot mode where the car drives itself on highways. Car ownership and driving habits are being completely reinvented. We'll explore the growing number of mobility technologies that are set to transform the current transportation ecosystem.


Now, AI can detect heart attacks over a phone call

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A Danish software company has developed an artificial intelligence (AI) programme that can detect heart attacks, according to a report in Bloomberg. The report said that the Corti SA's AI employs machine learning based on neural networks to analyse the words used in a panic call describing the incident, the tone of voice, and background noises. It then issues an alert about the likelihood of a heart attack. The software accurately detected cardiac arrests in 93% of cases versus 73% for human dispatchers, according to a study by the University of Copenhagen, the Danish National Institute of Public Health, and Copenhagen Emergency Medical Services. In addition, the software was able to make a decision in 48 seconds on an average, more than half a minute faster than humans.


Google is Using Machine Learning to Predict the Likelihood of a Patient's Death - with 95% Accuracy!

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With the amount of data being generated in healthcare, you would think technology would be better able to predict patient outcomes. But so far it has been limited to either the research lab or classroom where small datasets are used for binary classification problems. Google's presence in the healthcare space has been steadily increasing in recent times with studies like this one on cancer detection. Their latest research, led by a team of data scientists from Stanford, the University of Chicago, and UC San Francisco, tackles an even broader challenge – predicting the likelihood of a patient's death. Their AI can even predict how long a patient is likely to be admitted for, and the chances of them being re-admitted.


Google's AI can predict when a patient will die

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AI knows when you're going to die. But unlike in sci-fi movies, that information could end up saving lives. A new paper published in Nature suggests that feeding electronic health record data to a deep learning model could substantially improve the accuracy of projected outcomes. In trials using data from two U.S. hospitals, researchers were able to show that these algorithms could predict a patient's length of stay and time of discharge, but also the time of death. The neural network described in the study uses an immense amount of data, such as a patient's vitals and medical history, to make its predictions.


No longer science fiction: Artificial intelligence and robotics are transforming healthcare - Pharma industry

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No longer science fiction: Artificial intelligence and robotics are transforming healthcare Artificial intelligence – AI – is getting increasingly sophisticated at doing what humans do, albeit more efficiently, more quickly, and more cheaply. While AI and robotics are becoming a natural part of our everyday lives, their potential within healthcare is vast. Most of us are barely aware of it, but AI is everywhere we turn – it's in our cars, telling us when it's time for the engine to be serviced based on our driving patterns; it's in our everyday Google searches and the suggestions from Amazon that follow us around the web; it's the chatbot on the end of the telephone in call service centres. In homes, workplaces and clinical environments around the world, intelligent technologies such as AI and robots are supporting, diagnosing and treating people. How we embrace AI and robotics to complement and enhance healthcare services today will define our ability to deliver more effective, efficient and responsive healthcare services that reap improved health outcomes, which enabling individuals to own and manage their daily health needs.