globalization


Visibility into operations is the biggest issue plaguing supply chains - FreightWaves

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Rising consumer expectations on delivery standards have compelled supply chains to react faster and push for digitalization, to ensure transparency across stakeholders and visibility into operations. Though it makes obvious sense to say visibility increases efficiency, the push towards greater operational visibility has remained a difficult task. One of the primary problems that face supply chains is the siloed approach within logistics verticals, which has traditionally reduced fluidity between operations and hampered efficiency. This leads to fragmented visibility, which was cited as the biggest challenge to operations by 84% of chief supply chain officers (CSCOs) in a survey conducted by IBM. However, global supply chains are not easily malleable to technology disruptions.


How to Adjust to the Real Economic Impact of AI (and Labor Market Disruptions in General)

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In previous posts we reviewed the impact of globalization and (likely) impact of AI on the economy. Both these forces will fundamentally reshape local economies through changing which skills are in demand. Globalization has diffuse benefits and concentrated costs because countries optimize around their competitive advantage, harming local economies that rely heavily on particular industries and outputs susceptible to import competition. Similarly, AI (and other technology) will automate various tasks and change existing occupations while creating new ones, harming locations that heavily relied on those existing jobs. Even today we see the uneven impact of globalization and automation on the US economy.


Key Insights About The U.N.'s New Framework For Globalization Of Self-Driving Cars

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Trying to drive in a foreign land can be daunting. The car itself is pretty much the same in terms of its operational characteristics, meaning there's a steering wheel, a brake pedal, accelerator pedal and other driving-related controls that you can readily figure out. The tough part involves the act of driving the car and dealing with the differences when performing the driving task. There are likely different kinds of roadway signage than you might have seen in your home country. Fortunately, those signs are usually relatively standardized and visually easy to understand, even if you aren't especially familiar with the signage being used.


Key Insights About The U.N.'s New Framework For Globalization Of Self-Driving Cars

#artificialintelligence

AI self-driving cars might not be ready to handle driving practices across different countries, it could be a problem and a critical safety issue. Trying to drive in a foreign land can be daunting. The car itself is pretty much the same in terms of its operational characteristics, meaning there's a steering wheel, a brake pedal, accelerator pedal and other driving-related controls that you can readily figure out. The tough part involves the act of driving the car and dealing with the differences when performing the driving task. There are likely different kinds of roadway signage than you might have seen in your home country.


As technology like AI propels us into the future, it can also play an important role in preserving our past - Microsoft on the Issues

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It's hard to ignore the anxieties and even polarization that one sees in so many places around the world today. The forces of globalization are reshaping our communities in tangible ways. Increasingly, more people voice concerns about their place in society and their cultural identity and heritage. We see this not only in the United States, but across Europe, in Asia and elsewhere. Technology has played a big role in accelerating globalization.


Academia's Facial Recognition Datasets Illustrate The Globalization Of Today's Data

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This week's furor over FaceApp has largely centered on concerns that its Russian developers might be compelled to share the app's data with the Russian government, much as the Snowden disclosures illustrated the myriad ways in which American companies were compelled to disclose their private user data to the US government. Yet the reality is that this represents a mistaken understanding of just how the modern data trade works today and the simple fact that American universities and companies routinely make their data available to companies all across the world, including in Russia and China. In today's globalized world, data is just as globalized, with national borders no longer restricting the flow of our personal information - trend made worse by the data-hungry world of deep learning. Data brokers have long bought and sold our personal data in a shadowy world of international trade involving our most intimate and private information. The digital era has upended this explicit trade through the interlocking world of passive exchange through analytics services.


Canada's AI Corridor is Maturing: The Canadian AI Ecosystem in 2018 - jfgagne

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Welcome to the now "annual" Canadian AI Ecosystem Map. What a year it's been. The report also goes to feed the excellent (and searchable!) directory at Canada.ai. The point of creating this map was to emphasize that the strength lies in the Canadian AI Ecosystem, as opposed to just one city's. This year, we've seen ties strengthen, but also some weaknesses exposed.


Globots and telemigrants: The new language of the future of work

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To describe the future of work, Richard Baldwin is developing a new lexicon. The professor of international economics at the Graduate Institute in Geneva warns that we are unprepared for the ways in which new technology is changing the nature of globalization. Baldwin's new book, The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics, and the Future of Work, is a natural follow-up to his 2016 book, The Great Convergence. Three years ago, he explained how a third wave of globalization--a collapse in the cost of the movement of people thanks to technology--would be the most disruptive, because it hits workers in the service sector. Baldwin's new book, published earlier this year, breaks down what this disruption will entail.


Robots, AI And Blockchain: How Tech Pioneers Are Exploring New Frontiers In Davos

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World leaders and prominent CEOs are likely the first people you picture in Davos at the World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting each January. While you may be more likely to hear these higher profile CEOs weigh in on pressing global issues, these headlines only show a small section of those who attend Davos. Who you're less likely to read about are the thriving groups of smaller business leaders who attend each year. However, these up and coming cross-industry emerging leaders are out in full force at the meeting in Davos each year. One excellent example of how up-and-coming innovators are included in our annual meeting is in our Technology Pioneers.


US companies continue to look overseas for tech talent

ZDNet

A shortage of human capital in the US in the fields of software and IT is driving US multinational companies to establish and expand new "innovation hubs" abroad, according to researchers at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and Georgetown University. The researchers in a new report said the US is experiencing constraints on the supply of technology skills, which limit the possibilities for US-based multinational companies to be innovative. This comes within the context of a general trend toward research and development (R&D) globalization that has been underway for years, the researchers said. One of the distinguishing features of the R&D globalization phenomenon is its concentration within the software/IT domain. The increase in foreign R&D has been largely concentrated within software- and IT-intensive multinationals, and new R&D destinations are also more software- and IT-intensive multinationals than traditional R&D destinations, the study said.