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facial recognition system


DeepMind's Ithaca: Humans and AI combine to rediscover the past

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In March 2022 DeepMind, an artificial intelligence company, announced it had developed Ithaca, a deep neural network trained to restore and attribute ancient Greek inscriptions. Ancient Greek inscriptions have shaped our understanding of the Mediterranean world from 800BC to late antiquity. Inscriptions refer to text written on durable materials such as stone and pottery. Unfortunately, these materials are typically not durable enough to remain perfectly preserved for two millennia. Therefore, the epigraphic evidence of this period is often damaged by the time it is uncovered and the inscribed texts are incomplete as a result.


Argentine judge demands answers on how police got irregular biometrics access

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Argentine national security agencies have acquired irregular access to the biometric records of seven million people, including the president, and footage from Buenos Aires for identifying demonstrators via facial recognition cameras when authorized to access a list of fewer than 50,000 persons of interest, reports Página 12 via Público. The Buenos Aires judge who discovered the scandal has now demanded explanations from the city's Minister of Security and Justice as to how biometric data of a set of 62 cases relating to the capital, including those of the Argentine president and vice president, were transferred from the national ID database – the Registro Nacional de las Personas (ReNaPer) – to the city's authorities, namely the police, reports Página 12/Público. A massive breach of ReNaPer's digital ID database was reported last year. Judge Roberto Andrés Gallardo has suspended the use of the facial recognition system in question and has given Marcel D'Alessandro, Minister of Security and Justice for the City of Buenos Aires Government, two days to explain how the biometrics of persons such as former president and current vice president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner and fellow former president Alberto Fernández were used. D'Alessandro had previously said that the system had been deactivated during the pandemic.


FacePhi, CyberLink pass anti-spoofing face biometrics standard Level 2 compliance tests

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FacePhi and CyberLink earned passing marks in evaluations to the biometric presentation attack detection (PAD) standard from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) to demonstrate that their face biometrics systems can detect fraud attacks known as spoofing. The trials were conducted by iBeta Quality Assurance in Colorado, which is certified by U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NIST NVLAP). FacePhi received confirmation of its ISO/IEC 30107-3 Level 2 compliance to prove its facial recognition system's protection against identity fraud and impersonation with more sophisticated attack methods. The test consisted of FacePhi's digital onboarding and authentication solutions being subjected to phishing attacks using animation software, latex and resin masks, and 3D photography. "With this letter of compliance granted by iBeta, FacePhi demonstrates that its technology is strong and resistant to attacks, both level 1 and level 2 in accordance with ISO 30107-3", says Jorge Félix, quality and systems director of FacePhi.


How Much Does a Facial Recognition System Cost

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With the help of a facial recognition system, federal agents could capture a man suspected of abuse. The tool detected him in the background of someone else's photo at the gym, in the mirror. So, the agents were able to get to that gym, ask about the man, and eventually capture him. This real-life story, and many others, encourage businesses to benefit from AI services and deploy facial recognition systems. The global facial recognition market size was evaluated at $3.8 billion in 2020 and is expected to reach $8.5 billion in 2025, growing at a CAGR of 17.2%.


Data poisoning can't beat facial recognition – research

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If there was ever a reason to think data poisoning could fool facial recognition software, a recently published paper showed that reasoning is bunk. Those changes are invisible to the naked eye, but if effective they make them useless to facial recognition software. Researchers from Stanford University, Oregon State University and Google teamed up for the paper in which they single out two particular reasons why data poisoning won't keep people safe. First, the code written to "poison" photographs is freely available online. Second, there's no reason to assume a poisoned photo will be effective against future recognition models.


Ukraine harnesses Clearview AI to uncover assailants and identify the fallen

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Ukraine is using Clearview AI's facial recognition software to uncover Russian assailants and identify Ukrainians who've sadly lost their lives in the conflict. The company's chief executive, Hoan Ton-That, told Reuters that Ukraine's defence ministry began using the software on Saturday. Clearview AI's facial recognition system is controversial but indisputably powerful--using billions of images scraped from the web to identify just about anyone. Ton-That says that Clearview has more than two billion images from Russian social media service VKontakte alone. Reuters says that Ton-That sent a letter to Ukrainian authorities offering Clearview AI's assistance.


LORINC: Trying to police the way cops use AI-based investigation tools - Spacing Toronto

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Late last month, the Toronto Police Services Board released a new policy meant to guide the agency's future procurement and use of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies for law enforcement. The 4,800-word document, now posted on the TPSB's website, is the product of a fairly extensive canvas of public and expert opinion, and said to be the first such governance framework for any Canadian law enforcement agency. It consists of a general statement about guiding principles and an articulation of the policy's purpose, as well as 21 separate operational provisions divided into four broad categories: review and assessment of new AI technologies; board approval and reporting prior to procurement, utilization and deployment; monitoring and reporting; and continuous review. As with all matters policing, the board -- which consists of elected and appointed civilians -- sets the policy at a high level, while the chief of police is responsible for carrying it out and then reporting back to the TPSB on how things are going. On paper, an elegant arrangement, more often honoured in the breach than the observance, as the saying goes.


AI Can Erase Tattoos from Photos to Help Face Recognition Systems

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An image of the rapper Lil Peep before (left) and after (right) tattoo removal by an algorithm. Researchers at Germany's Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences trained an algorithm to remove facial tattoos to improve facial recognition systems. The process involved automatically adding ink to 41 images of untattooed faces, with tattoos covering 5% to 25% of the face in the image. A generative adversarial network (GAN) was trained using these images and was able to remove the tattoos, though it had issues with those covering the entire face. The GAN-altered images were tested against a facial recognition system, halving the system's error rate when the tattoos were removed by the GAN.


Texas sues Meta over the facial recognition system it shut down last year

Engadget

Meta's past use of facial recognition technology has once again landed the company in potential legal trouble. On Monday, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton filed a lawsuit against the company, alleging it had collected the biometric data of millions of Texans without obtaining their informed consent to do so. At the center of the case is Facebook's now discontinued use of facial recognition technology. The platform previously employed the technology as part of its "tag suggestions" feature, which used image recognition to scan photos and automatically tag users in them. Last November, Meta shut down that system, citing, among other reasons, " uncertainty" about how the technology would be regulated in the future.


Democrats urge federal agencies to ditch Clearview AI's facial recognition tech

Engadget

Four Democratic senators and House representatives have called on several government departments to stop using Clearview AI's facial recognition system. The Government Accountability Office said in August that the Departments of Justice, Defense, Homeland Security and the Interior were all using the contentious technology for "domestic law enforcement." Pramila Jayapal and Ayanna Pressley urged the agencies to refrain from using Clearview's products and other facial recognition tools. "Clearview AI's technology could eliminate public anonymity in the United States," the lawmakers wrote to the agencies in their letters, which were obtained by The Verge. They said that, combined with the facial recognition system, the database of billions of photos Clearview scraped from social media platforms "is capable of fundamentally dismantling Americans' expectation that they can move, assemble or simply appear in public without being identified."