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Filtering for Beauty

Communications of the ACM

Houston-based hairstylist Taylor Crowley, 36, has built a reputation as a social media influencer and has been using augmented reality (AR) filters for the past few years as a "confidence booster." I don't wear a ton of makeup because less is more," she explains. "I try to choose filters that aren't going to distort my face." Crowley is also "big into photography" and views image filters like a filter on a camera that can be used to change tonal qualities. In one Instagram post of her posing with a large fish, Crowley used Adobe Lightroom to turn everything grayscale "because we live in Houston and fish in Galveston, and honestly, not everything is very pretty," she says. "I thought grayscale made the fish pop out." Similarly, Crowley posted a picture of herself in a bathing suit on Cinco de Mayo and grayed out the background to accentuate the beer can she was drinking from--and her green bathing suit. As someone who views content herself, "I think editing things that show a little more color or pop … grabs my attention a little bit more." Crowley is quick to add that she does not use filters when she posts client-related content. "Because I'm a hair stylist, I feel that it's cheating" to use filters, she says. I also want people to have a reasonable expectation when they come to get their hair done."


APPLICATIONS OF AI IN YOUR HOUSEHOLD: TOP 10 USE OF AI AT HOME

#artificialintelligence

You might think that artificial intelligence is only something the tech giants are focused on and that it doesn't have any impact on your household or everyday life. But the reality is different. Whether you realize it or not, Artificial Intelligence is everywhere. The application of AI is not only for big sectors or finance or manufacturing, it is also impacting our daily lives. So, let's find out about the applications of AI in your daily life.


Terrifyingly, Facebook wants its AI to be your eyes and ears

#artificialintelligence

Facebook has announced a research project that aims to push the "frontier of first-person perception", and in the process help you remember where you left your keys. The Ego4D project provides a huge collection of first-person video and related data, plus a set of challenges for researchers to teach computers to understand the data and gather useful information from it. In September, the social media giant launched a line of "smart glasses" called Ray-Ban Stories, which carry a digital camera and other features. Much like the Google Glass project, which met mixed reviews in 2013, this one has prompted complaints of privacy invasion. Tickets to TNW Conference 2022 are available now!


Facebook is now developing a human-like artificial intelligence called Ego4D

#artificialintelligence

Facebook announced a research project Thursday that aims to develop an artificial intelligence capable of perceiving the world like a human being. The project, titled Ego4D, aims to train an artificial intelligence (AI) to perceive the world in the first-person by analyzing a constant stream of video from people's lives. This type of data, which Facebook calls "egocentric" data, is designed to help the AI perceive, remember and plan like a human being. "Next-generation AI systems will need to learn from an entirely different kind of data -- videos that show the world from the center of the action, rather than the sidelines," Kristen Grauman, lead AI research scientist at Facebook, said in the announcement. The project aims to improve AI technology's capacity to accomplish human processes by setting five key benchmarks: "episodic memory," in which the AI ties memories to specific locations and times, "forecasting," "social interaction," "hand and object manipulation" and "audio-visual diarization," in which the AI ties auditory experiences to specific locations and times.


A New AI Lexicon: Algolinguicism

#artificialintelligence

Which languages and language-users are prioritized by digital platforms? Speakers of non-dominant languages are disproportionately subject to algorithmic harms.¹ They confront content moderation algorithms that "only work in certain languages"² on platforms that structurally omit non-Western nations from governance considerations. I call this tendency algolinguicism -- a matrix of automated processes that minoritize language-users outside the Global North and obstruct their access to political participation. This essay addresses digital platforms as sites of algolinguicism.


Facebonk, Bacefook, Hellsite: Zuck, the internet has some suggestions

The Guardian

Facebook is reportedly preparing to unveil a new name as the company seeks to rebrand, and the internet has already come through with some pointed suggestions. The plans, first reported by the Verge on Tuesday, comes at a time of upheaval for the company. In the last few months alone, Facebook has been served with a lawsuit from the Federal Trade Commission, was the subject of a congressional hearing after a whistleblower revealed worrying internal practices at the company, and is facing a walkout of moderators over working conditions. Ideas for how to overhaul its toxic image followed swiftly after the news broke. Reporter Katie Notopoulos at Buzzfeed put forward a number of options: BookFace, MySpace, Facey McBookface, Definitely NOT Facebook, Hellsite, Oops We Facilitated Genocide, and The Good And Nice Company, Not At All Evil.


The benefits of being a telecoms carrier faced with GAFA

#artificialintelligence

"When it comes to the economy, data is the new oil," said entrepreneur Clive Humby in 2006. History has proven him right beyond all expectations. Empires have been built on bigger and bigger mountains of data. Over the course of a decade, GAFA (Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple) increased their sales from $78 billion in 2008 to $773 billion in 2019. From the outset, GAFA put everything into this new oil, developing data-driven services such as a search engine (Google), online sales (Amazon) and social networking (Facebook).


Applications of AI in Your Household: Top 10 Use of AI at Home

#artificialintelligence

You might think that artificial intelligence is only something the tech giants are focused on and that it doesn't have any impact on your household or everyday life. But the reality is different. Whether you realize it or not, Artificial Intelligence is everywhere. The application of AI is not only for big sectors or finance or manufacturing, it is also impacting our daily lives. So, let's find out about the applications of AI in your daily life.


Can AI be Biased? Think Again.

#artificialintelligence

Naturally, we're biased to believe that we're the best -- just like you -- but we think it's important to question things sometimes. Technology can be biased -- even if it's not its fault. There are plenty of reasons to be wary about artificial intelligence. AI systems can inherit biases from their creators and from their surroundings. If the goal is to eliminate bias, it's important to consider AI bias. As researchers found, Google's image recognition algorithms labelled people of color as gorillas or that Microsoft's AI chatbot Tay rapidly became racist and sexist, and these biases were reinforced by how it was taught.


Decade Of Artificial Intelligence: A Summary

#artificialintelligence

The world has seen a boom in the field of Artificial Intelligence in the past few years. The major reasons contributing to this is the availability of data and computing power. A lot of research has happened in the field of AI in the last decade and society has witnessed many amazing use cases. In the last decade, AI went mainstream because of the availability of hardware, courses, platforms, big companies taking workshops, etc. What our AI community has achieved in the last decade has set a strong foundation for the future.