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Some Facebook users don't have the option to turn off facial recognition technology, study finds

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A consumer advocacy group has discovered that not all Facebook users have access to a privacy setting that lets them opt out of the site's facial recognition technology. Consumer Reports examined a set of Facebook accounts and found that a significant number didn't have the ability to toggle off Face Recognition, a feature that uses facial recognition technology to identify users in tagged photos. That's despite Facebook announcing almost two years ago that all users would be able to opt out of facial recognition entirely through the setting. A consumer advocacy group has discovered that not all Facebook users have access to a privacy setting that lets them opt out of the site's facial recognition technology Users can control whether they're part of Facebook's facial recognition technology by selecting'privacy shortcuts' in the righthand corner of their News Feed. From there, select'Control face recognition' under Privacy.


If facial recognition is good enough for Taylor Swift, is it good enough for you?

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

In this Oct. 31, 2018, file photo, a man, who declined to be identified, has his face painted to represent efforts to defeat facial recognition during a protest at Amazon headquarters over the company's facial recognition system, "Rekognition," in Seattle. San Francisco is on track to become the first U.S. city to ban the use of facial recognition by police and other city agencies. These days, with facial recognition technology, you've got a face that can launch a thousand applications, so to speak. Sure, you may love the ease of opening your phone just by facing it instead of tapping in a code. But how do you feel about having your mug scanned, identifying you as you drive across a bridge, when you board an airplane or to confirm you're not a stalker on your way into a Taylor Swift concert?


The Rise Of The Machines - BBC Click

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We look at recent advances in the field of artificial intelligence and also addresses some of the issues surrounding the use of facial recognition. We try out the latest in virtual reality hardware and look at a camera system that could change the way that we watch football. Find us online at www.bbc.com/click


AI in 2040

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What does the field of Artificial Intelligence look like in 2040? It's a really hard question to answer since there are still so many unanswered questions about the nature of reality and computing. That's what keeps me going. Hit the Join button above to sign up to become a member of my channel for access to exclusive live streams! Join us at the School of AI: https://theschool.ai/


Facebook is experimenting with robots to push its AI research forward

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Facebook is certainly a high-tech company, but it's not one you would necessarily associate with robots. However, as the firm revealed today, that's exactly where its researchers are looking next -- trying to see how experiments in robotics can further its work in AI. A lot of firms, including Google, Nvidia, and Amazon, use robots as a platform to explore avenues of AI research. Controlling robots is, in many ways, trickier than challenges like playing board games and video games. With these latter tasks, researchers have access to simulated game environments, which allows AI agents to play and learn at accelerated speeds.


Inside Facebook's robotics lab where it teaches six-legged bots to walk and makes its AI smarter

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Facebook isn't often thought of as a robotics company, but new work being done in the social media giant's skunkworks AI lab is trying to prove otherwise. The company on Monday gave a detailed look into some of the projects being undertaken by its AI researchers at its Menlo Park, California-based headquarters, many of which are aimed at making robots smarter. Among the machines being developed are walking hexapods that resemble a spider, a robotic arm and a human-like hand complete with sensors to help it touch. Facebook has a dedicated team of AI researchers at its headquarters in Menlo Park, California that are tasked with testing out robots. The hope is that their learnings can be applied to other AI software in the company and make those systems smarter.


Now Facebook is using robots to advance its work in artificial intelligence

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Facebook is trying to develop artificial intelligence models that will allow robots–including walking hexapods, articulated arms, and robotic hands fitted with tactile sensors–to learn by themselves, and to keep getting smarter as they encounter more and more tasks and situations. In the case of the spider-like hexapod ("Daisy") I saw walking around a patio at Facebook last week, the researchers give a goal to the robot and task the model with figuring out by trial and error how to get there. The goal can be as simple as just moving forward. In order to walk, the spider has to know a lot about its balance, location, and orientation in space. It gathers this information through the sensors on its legs.


Facebook finally revealed what its secretive robotics division is working on, and it could spark new competition with rivals like Google and Apple

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Facebook has publicly spoken about its interest in robotics in the past, but on Monday, the company finally shared details regarding the specific projects it's working on. The social media giant unveiled three robotics projects that it hopes will contribute to solving the ongoing challenge of building artificial intelligence systems that don't have to rely on large quantities of labeled data to learn new information. To do so, the company is conducting research aimed at teaching robots how to learn about the world, similar to the way that humans do. "The real world is messy, it's difficult," Roberto Calandra, a research scientist in Facebook's AI division said when speaking to Business Insider. "The world is not a perfect place; it's not neat. So the fact that we are trying to develop algorithms that work on real robots [will] help to create [AI] algorithms that, generally speaking, are going to be more reliable, more robust, and that are going to learn faster."


Facebook Research is developing touchy-feely curious robots

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"Much of our work in robotics is focused on self-supervised learning, in which systems learn directly from raw data so they can adapt to new tasks and new circumstances," a team of researchers from FAIR (Facebook AI Research) wrote in a blog post. "In robotics, we're advancing techniques such as model-based reinforcement learning (RL) to enable robots to teach themselves through trial and error using direct input from sensors." Specifically, the team has been trying to get a six-legged robot to teach itself to walk without any outside assistance. "Generally speaking, locomotion is a very difficult task in robotics and this is what it makes it very exciting from our perspective," Roberto Calandra, a FAIR researcher, told Engadget. "We have been able to design algorithms for AI and actually test them on a really challenging problem that we otherwise don't know how to solve."


6 Ways Top Influencers Are Implementing AI and Machine Learning to Grow Their Followers

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With over 31.25 million Facebook posts per minute, 6000 tweets per second and 95 million Instagram posts every day, it's genuinely commendable how top social media influencers can work their way through big data analytics and present relevant and timely content to their respective industries. Whether they focus on tech, fashion, fitness, business or beauty, influencers are continually learning and improving to stay ahead of their competition. With sufficient exposure to AI and machine learning solutions created to help social media marketing, you can also increase your social media conversion rates. John McCarthy, one of the early pioneers in the field of AI, defined artificial intelligence as "the science of making machines that can perform tasks that are characteristic of human intelligence." These tasks may include understanding language, translating content between languages, recognizing elements in images and speech or making decisions.