emotion


Communication Re-Imagined with Emotion AI - ReadWrite

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There has long been a chasm between what we perceive artificial intelligence to be and what it can actually do. Our films, literature, and video game representations of "intelligent machines," depict AI as detached but highly intuitive interfaces. We will find communication re-imagined with emotion AI. As these artificial systems are being integrated into our commerce, entertainment, and logistics networks, we are witnessing emotional intelligence. These smarter systems have a better understanding of how humans feel and why they feel that way.


Neuromarketing: Use These 3 Brain-Targeting Hacks to Sell More

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But don't worry, you don't need to be a qualified scientist to wrap your head around customer physiology. Physiology The way in which a living organism or bodily part functions. The following'neuro' tips and tricks are based on years of comprehensive research. All you need to do is run, measure and refine these data-backed mind hacks for your particular business. Be prepared to metaphorically zap some customer brains into motion!


Identifying perceived emotions from people's walking style

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A team of researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Maryland at College Park has recently developed a new deep learning model that can identify people's emotions based on their walking styles. Their approach, outlined in a paper pre-published on arXiv, works by extracting an individual's gait from an RGB video of him/her walking, then analyzing it and classifying it as one of four emotions: happy, sad, angry or neutral. "Emotions play a significant role in our lives, defining our experiences, and shaping how we view the world and interact with other humans," Tanmay Randhavane, one of the primary researchers and a graduate student at UNC, told TechXplore. "Perceiving the emotions of other people helps us understand their behavior and decide our actions toward them. For example, people communicate very differently with someone they perceive to be angry and hostile than they do with someone they perceive to be calm and contented."


AI will judge suspects in blink of an eye

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Police could soon get help from an artificial intelligence system that reads the hidden emotions of suspects by scanning involuntary "micro-expressions". The technology analyses fleeting facial movements that researchers believe betray true emotions and are impossible to suppress or fake. The system has been developed by Facesoft, a British company co-founded by Allan Ponniah, a consultant plastic surgeon at the Royal Free Hospital in northwest London, who first used AI to reconstruct patients' faces. The company, which has held discussions with police forces in Britain and India, describes micro-expressions as "emotional leakage". The expressions were first linked to deception by psychologists in the 1960s, who noticed that suicidal patients sometimes lied to disguise strong negative feelings.


Our Aversion to A/B Testing on Humans Is Dangerous - Facts So Romantic

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Facebook once teamed up with scientists at Cornell to conduct a now-infamous experiment on emotional contagion. Researchers randomly assigned 700,000 users to see on their News Feeds, for one week, a slight uptick in either positive or negative language or no change at all, to determine whether exposure to certain emotions could, in turn, cause a user to express certain emotions. The answer, as revealed in a 2014 paper, was yes: The emotions we see expressed online can change the emotions that we express, albeit slightly. Conversations about emotional contagion were quickly shelved, however, as the public disclosure of the study sparked an intense backlash against what many perceived to be an unjust and underhanded manipulation of people's feelings. Facebook would later apologize for fiddling with users' emotions and pledge to revise its internal review practices.


Ready or Not: AI Customer Service Will Change Your Business and Brand

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Say hello to the future: the robots are right here. Artificial intelligence is flipping all kinds of traditional business models on their heads. In the customer support space, AI is changing the customer experience for better or for worse depending on the elegance of your deployment. And the new world of AI is creating out-of-this-world efficiencies for businesses who are leveraging it effectively. Whether you are seeking to enhance your customer service or you want to boost business processes, here is some binge-worthy content to consider as you explore the perspectives and benefits available through AI customer service and business solutions.


The future of personalization--and how to get ready for it

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The exciting promise of personalization may not be here yet (at least not at scale), but it's not far off. Advances in technology, data, and analytics will soon allow marketers to create much more personal and "human" experiences across moments, channels, and buying stages. Physical spaces will be reconceived, and customer journeys will be supported far beyond a brand's front door. While these opportunities are exciting, most marketers feel underequipped to deliver. A recent McKinsey survey of senior marketing leaders finds that only 15 percent of CMOs believe their company is on the right track with personalization.


7 Types Of Artificial Intelligence

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This is the final stage of AI development which currently exists only hypothetically. Self-aware AI, which, self explanatorily, is an AI that has evolved to be so akin to the human brain that it has developed self-awareness. Creating this type of Ai, which is decades, if not centuries away from materializing, is and will always be the ultimate objective of all AI research. This type of AI will not only be able to understand and evoke emotions in those it interacts with, but also have emotions, needs, beliefs, and potentially desires of its own. And this is the type of AI that doomsayers of the technology are wary of.


This $3.2 Billion Industry Could Turn Millions of Surveillance Cameras Into an Army of Robot Security Guards

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We are surrounded by surveillance cameras that record us at every turn. But for the most part, while those cameras are watching us, no one is watching what those cameras observe or record because no one will pay for the armies of security guards that would be required for such a time-consuming and monotonous task. But imagine that all that video were being watched -- that millions of security guards were monitoring them all 24/7. Imagine this army is made up of guards who don't need to be paid, who never get bored, who never sleep, who never miss a detail, and who have total recall for everything they've seen. Such an army of watchers could scrutinize every person they see for signs of "suspicious" behavior.


Realeyes raises $12.4 million to help brands detect emotion using AI on facial expressions

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Artificial emotional intelligence, or "emotion AI," is emerging as a key component of the broader AI movement. The general idea is this: It's all very well having machines that can understand and respond to natural-language questions, and even beat humans at games, but until they can decipher non-verbal cues such as vocal intonations, body language, and facial expressions, humans will always have the upper hand in understanding other humans. And it's against that backdrop that countless companies are working toward improving computer vision and voice analysis techniques, to help machines detect the intricate and finely balanced emotions of a flesh-and-bones homo sapiens. One of those companies is Realeyes, a company that helps big brands such as AT&T, Mars, Hershey's, and Coca-Cola gauge human emotions through desktop computers' and mobile devices' cameras. The London-based startup, which was founded in 2007, today announced a fresh $12.4 million round of funding from Draper Esprit, the VC arm of Japanese telecom giant NTT Docomo, Japanese VC fund Global Brain, Karma Ventures, and The Entrepreneurs Fund.