dji


Drone vulnerability could compromise enterprise data SC Media

#artificialintelligence

Check Point Researchers developed an attack to hijack DJI drone user accounts that may contain the user's sensitive information as well as access to the device itself. Researchers developed an XSS attack that could be posted on a DJI forum that is used by hundreds of thousands of DJI customers, to intercept the identifying token and use it to log in as the customer, according to a Nov. 11 blog post. The attack demonstrates the vulnerability in the drone's cloud network which can be accessed from anywhere by highlighting the need for a two-factor authentication mechanism, better identification mechanisms, and the importance of segmentation for organizations across their IT networks in order to contain and limit the damage inflicted by a potential attack. The attacker enters the web forum, steals the cookie ID and login, then either uses the stolen information to either bypass SeNeo Mobile protection to access a DJI mobile app or to access the full DJI Flight Hub. Once this is done, the threat actor has access to the drone's flight records, photos taken during flight, payment details, real-time access to the drones camera,, and a live view of the drone pilot's camera and location.


Flaw in DJI website gave hackers access to user accounts and live feeds from quadcopters

Daily Mail

A worrying vulnerability in DJI drones gave hackers complete access to a user's account without them realizing it. Security researchers from Check Point in March discovered a flaw in DJI's cloud infrastructure that allowed attackers to take over users' accounts and access private data like drone logs with location data, maps, account information and photos or videos taken during flight. However, DJI said it patched the vulnerability in September. A worrying vulnerability in DJI drones gave hackers complete access to a user's account. Users fell prey to the attack by clicking on a malicious link shared through DJI Forum, an online forum the firm runs for user discussions about its products.


A DJI Bug Exposed Drone Photos and User Data

WIRED

DJI makes some of the most popular quadcopters on the market, but its products have repeatedly drawn scrutiny from the United States government over privacy and security concerns. Most recently, the Department of Defense in May banned the purchase of consumer drones made by a handful of vendors, including DJI. Now DJI has patched a problematic vulnerability in its cloud infrastructure that could have allowed an attacker to take over users' accounts and access private data like photos and videos taken during drone flights, a user's personal account information, and flight logs that include location data. A hacker could have even potentially accessed real-time drone location and a live camera feed during a flight. The security firm Check Point discovered the issue and reported it in March through DJI's bug bounty program.


World's top consumer drone maker scores U.S. wins despite security concerns as China trade war takes toll

The Japan Times

SAN FRANCISCO/BEIJING – DJI, the world's top seller of drones for consumers, has snagged a pair of wins in its effort to court businesses. SZ DJI Technology Co. said its latest industrial gadget -- the Mavic 2 Enterprise -- will soon survey power grids for U.S. utility Southern Co., while American Airlines Group Inc. will test the craft for plane inspections. Those are important alliances for the Chinese company, which is grappling with a U.S. government shut-out, a potentially damaging patent lawsuit and rising American tariffs. Privacy is a particularly thorny issue for DJI -- one of the few Chinese technology giants that's made major strides abroad. Escalating U.S. tensions are fueling concerns about the dominance of a Chinese company in unmanned flying craft.


World's top consumer drone maker scores U.S. wins despite security concerns as China trade war takes toll

The Japan Times

SAN, FRANCISCO/BEIJING – DJI, the world's top seller of drones for consumers, has snagged a pair of wins in its effort to court businesses. SZ DJI Technology Co. Ltd. said its latest industrial gadget -- the Mavic 2 -- will soon survey power grids for U.S. utility Southern Co., while American Airlines Group Inc. will test the craft for plane inspections. Those are important alliances for the Chinese company, which is grappling with a U.S. government shut-out, a potentially damaging patent lawsuit and rising American tariffs. Privacy is a particularly thorny issue for DJI -- one of the few Chinese technology giants that's made major strides abroad. Escalating U.S. tensions are fueling concerns about the dominance of a Chinese company in unmanned flying craft.


UK police forced to ground drones after DJI warns that some are falling out of the sky mid-flight

Daily Mail

Dronemaker DJI has warned that some of its unmanned aerial vehicles are suddenly falling out of the sky mid-flight. The company says there have been a'small number' of reports surrounding its Matrice 200 series drones, where a power issue is causing them to crash mid-flight. However, the warning has prompted UK police to ground some of their drones. DJI says there have been a'small number' of reports surrounding its Matrice 200 series drones (pictured), where a power issue is causing them to crash mid-flight The United Kingdom Civil Aviation Authority issued a safety notice saying that some 200 model drones lost power mid-flight and dropped straight down to the ground. In one case, a drone experienced an'in-flight issue' and landed on the roof of a commercial building.


DJI's latest Mavic 2 drone is built for search and rescue

Engadget

DJI's stacked consumer drones output spans entry-level fliers (the Spark) to high-end behemoths (Mavic 2 Pro). Now it's expanding its commercial lineup with the launch of the Mavic 2 Enterprise (M2E): a starter drone for businesses that don't require the bells and whistles the full-fat Matrice series offers. The latter is already being utilized by Disney and Japanese construction giant Komatsu -- but DJI's newcomer is eyeing the emergency services sector and small-to-medium-sized businesses. The M2E is essentially a Mavic 2 Zoom tweaked for enterprise. It comes equipped with a 12 megapixel camera, stabilized by a three-axis gimbal for "smooth video and images," and 2x optical and 3x digital zoom.


Thermal (Infrared) Drones Explained

#artificialintelligence

Thermal Imaging sensors are commonly referred to terminology such as thermal camera, temperature camera, heat vision camera, infrared camera, thermal imaging sensor, heat signature camera, and even thermal heat vision sensor. In this post we will refer to this type of imaging as infrared or thermal imaging. Infrared energy is generated by the vibration of atoms and molecules. The higher the temperature of an object, the faster its molecules and atoms move. This movement is emitted as infrared radiation which our eyes cannot see but our skin can feel. Thermal imaging is the use of a special infrared camera sensors to illuminate a spectrum of light invisible to the naked eye.


How to safely charge and store lithium drone batteries

Engadget

This post was done in partnership with Wirecutter. When readers choose to buy Wirecutter's independently chosen editorial picks, Wirecutter and Engadget may earn affiliate commission. Although flying a drone might sound like the biggest risk in operating one, dealing with the batteries is potentially more explosive. At the 100 hospital emergency rooms that report electronics-related injury cases to the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, more than 200 incidents (PDF) involving drone batteries, stemming from fire, smoke, and explosions, were recorded between 2012 and 2017. Not every drone-battery incident results in an injury, but each pilot and expert I interviewed had a story about an exploding or fiery lithium battery going off especially after it had repeatedly crashed to the ground inside a drone.