digital trend


A.I. Brain Implant Translates Thoughts Into Spoken Words Digital Trends

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Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, have developed a brain implant which uses deep-learning artificial intelligence to transform thoughts into complete sentences. The technology could one day be used to help restore speech in patients who are unable to speak due to paralysis. "The algorithm is a special kind of artificial neural network, inspired by work in machine translation," Joseph Makin, one of the researchers involved in the project, told Digital Trends. "Their problem, like ours, is to transform a sequence of arbitrary length into a sequence of arbitrary length." The neural net, Makin explained, consists of two stages.


A.I. Could Help Spot Telltale Signs Of COVID-19 In X-Rays Digital Trends

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There are many pain points when it comes to the coronavirus, officially known as COVID-19. One of them is how exactly to test people for it when the necessary testing kits are in short supply and, according to at least some theories, many more people may have already had it than current estimates suggest. One possible solution could be to allow artificial intelligence to scrutinize chest X-rays of patients' lungs to spot signs of potential coronavirus-caused lung damage. That's the basis for several exciting and promising attempts to develop a neural network that could be used to give a strong indication of whether or not a patient likely has COVID-19. Researchers at Chinese medical company Infervision recently teamed up with Wuhan Tongji Hospital in China to develop a COVID-19 diagnostic tool.


A.I. Is Helping Archaeologists Translate Ancient Tablets Digital Trends

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Deep-learning artificial intelligence is helping grapple with plenty of problems in the modern world. But it also has its part to play in helping solve some ancient problems as well -- such as assisting in the translation of 2,500-year-old clay tablet documents from Persia's Achaemenid Empire. These tablets, which were discovered in modern-day Iran in 1933, have been studied by scholars for decades. However, they've found the translation process for the tablets -- which number in the tens of thousands -- to be laborious and prone to errors. "We have initial experiments applying machine learning to identify which cuneiform symbols are present in images of a tablet," Sanjay Krishnan, assistant professor at the University of Chicago's Department of Computer Science, told Digital Trends.


Google Robot Teaches Itself To Walk In Just Two Hours Digital Trends

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Do you remember that scene in Walt Disney's Bambi where the titular fawn learns to stand up and walk under its own power? It's a charming vignette in the movie, showcasing a skill that plenty of baby animals -- from pigs to giraffe to, yes, deer -- pick up within minutes of their birth. Over the first few hours of life, these animals rapidly refine their motor skills until they have full control over their own locomotion. Humans, who learn to stand holding onto things at around seven months and who begin walking at 15 months, are hopelessly sluggish by comparison. Guess what the latest task that robots have beaten us at?


Google Robot Teaches Itself To Walk In Just Two Hours Digital Trends

#artificialintelligence

Do you remember that scene in Walt Disney's Bambi where the titular fawn learns to stand up and walk under its own power? It's a charming vignette in the movie, showcasing a skill that plenty of baby animals -- from pigs to giraffe to, yes, deer -- pick up within minutes of their birth. Over the first few hours of life, these animals rapidly refine their motor skills until they have full control over their own locomotion. Humans, who learn to stand holding onto things at around seven months and who begin walking at 15 months, are hopelessly sluggish by comparison. Guess what the latest task that robots have beaten us at?


This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through February 22)

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The Messy, Secretive Reality Behind OpenAI's Bid to Save the World Karen Hao MIT Technology Review "There is a misalignment between what the company publicly espouses and how it operates behind closed doors. Over time, it has allowed a fierce competitiveness and mounting pressure for ever more funding to erode its founding ideals of transparency, openness, and collaboration." The Studs on This Punk Bracelet Are Actually Microphone-Jamming Ultrasonic Speakers Andrew Liszewski Gizmodo "You can prevent facial recognition cameras from identifying you by wearing face paint, masks, or sometimes just a pair of oversized sunglasses. Keeping conversations private from an ever-growing number of microphone-equipped devices isn't quite as easy, but researchers have created what could be the first wearable that actually helps increase your privacy." Iron Man Dreams Are Closer to Becoming a Reality Thanks to This New Jetman Dubai Video Julia Alexander The Verge "Tony Stark may have destroyed his Iron Man suits in Iron Man 3 (only to bring out a whole new line in Avengers: Age of Ultron), but Jetman Dubai's Iron Man-like dreams of autonomous human flight are realer than ever. A new video published by the company shows pilot Vince Reffet using a jet-powered, carbon-fiber suit to launch off the ground and fly 6,000 feet in the air."


Deep Learning A.I. Can Imitate The Sound Of Iconic Guitar Amps Digital Trends

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Music making is increasingly digitized here in 2020, but some analog audio effects are still very difficult to reproduce in this way. One of those effects is the kind of screeching guitar distortion favored by rock gods everywhere. Up to now, these effects, which involve guitar amplifiers, have been next to impossible to re-create digitally. That's now changed thanks to the work of researchers in the department of signal processing and acoustics at Finland's Aalto University. Using deep learning artificial intelligence (A.I.), they have created a neural network for guitar distortion modeling that, for the first time, can fool blind-test listeners into thinking it's the genuine article.


DARPA is using gamers' brain waves to train robot swarms

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A team of artificial intelligence researchers at the University at Buffalo plans to study the brain waves and eye movements of around 25 people, Digital Trends reports, while they play a video game. They'll then use the information they glean from the gamers to build an advanced AI -- so that it can then coordinate the actions of entire fleets of autonomous military robots. The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency -- better known as DARPA -- has awarded the UB team a $316,000 grant for the study, which researcher Souma Chowdhury told Digital Trends is moving at "a pretty aggressive pace." The team still needs to gather the gamer data, but that shouldn't take too long. The researchers have already built a real-time strategy game for the study, with a round of the game taking about five to 10 minutes to complete.


Bosch Drawing Lessons From Autonomous Car Pilot Program in San Jose Digital Trends

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The companies racing to deploy autonomous cars on the world's roads took a reality check in the 2010s, but multimillion-dollar development efforts remain ongoing across the automotive and tech industries. German supplier Bosch is notably moving full speed ahead with its quest to make driverless cars a reality. Kay Stepper, Bosch's senior vice president of automated driving, sat down with Digital Trends to talk about the state of autonomous driving in 2020, and what's next for the artificial intelligence technology that powers the prototypes it's testing. Bosch has never made a car, so it brings its innovations to the market through partnerships with automakers. It chose Mercedes-Benz parent company Daimler to test autonomous technology in real-world conditions via a ridesharing pilot program in San Jose, California, close to one of the company's research centers.


The BIC Wet Razor is a Prototype Shaver That Uses A.I. Digital Trends

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When you think of devices that might utilize artificial intelligence, you likely think of smart home technology, laptops, and video games. At CES 2020, Bic announced The Next Bic Thing, a collaborative platform the company plans to use to foster innovation and creative products. One of these collaborative efforts is with Invoxia and it's is something surprising: A connected razor. What might artificial intelligence offer a razor, you ask? The technology is said to capture information about the temperature of the water, the humidity in the room, how dense your hair is, your shaving speed, number of strokes, total time spent shaving, how dull the blade is, and much more.